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My Take: On adoption, Christians should put up or shut up
June 16th, 2011
03:11 PM ET

My Take: On adoption, Christians should put up or shut up

Editor's Note: Jason Locy is co-author of Veneer: Living Deeply in a Surface Society. He and his wife are adoptive parents and participants in Safe Families for Children, a voluntary alternative to foster care.

By Jason Locy, Special to CNN

When the Arkansas Supreme court struck down a voter-approved initiative that banned cohabitating straight and gay couples from adopting orphaned children, the Christian community predictably erupted.

Byron Babione of the Alliance Defense Fund, a coalition of Christian lawyers, attributed the April ruling to a “political movement afoot to undermine and destroy marriage.” Baptist Press, the publications arm of the Southern Baptist Convention, ran an article that quoted Babione as saying the ruling reflected “a campaign to place adult wants and desires over the best interests of children."

On one hand, these comments aren’t surprising. Conservative evangelicals have decried “the anti-family gay agenda” for decades. On the other, they underscore the way many Christians denounce a social problem that they have no plan for solving.

And the problem here is not ultimately gays adopting — the prevention of which, I believe, was the impetus behind the Arkansas initiative and behind adoption restrictions in various other states. The problem is a global orphan crisis involving tens of millions of children.

In the United States, there are approximately 116,000 foster children waiting to be adopted. That means a judge has either severed the rights of the original parents or the parents have voluntarily signed their children over to the government.

To put this into perspective, we might compare the number of American orphans to the purported 16 million Southern Baptists who attend more than 42,000 churches nationwide. Quick math reveals that there are roughly 138 Southern Baptists for every child in the American foster care system waiting to be adopted. To say it another way, this single denomination has an enormous opportunity to eradicate the orphan crisis in America.

If you’ve spent any time in church, you’ve probably heard a sermon on Noah or Moses or David. But how many sermons have you heard on the biblical mandate to care for orphans?

When was the last time you heard your pastor declare, “if you choose to adopt a child we will stand with you. We will provide respite care, financial help and do everything possible to meet the needs of that child?”

Southern Baptists, Presbyterians, Methodists, Catholics — the Christian Church — can provide safe, loving, permanent homes for these kids. Our faith dictates that we fight for a better way in both words and deeds.

When Jesus asked Peter if he loved him, and Peter responded yes, Jesus didn’t tell him to picket the wolves. He told Peter to feed and tend his sheep.

Some churches and Christian groups are stepping up. Focus on the Family launched a Wait No More initiative in Colorado in 2008, forming partnerships between local churches, adoption agencies and the government in order to encourage families to adopt through the foster care system. As a result, the number of Colorado orphans waiting for a family has been cut in half.

Christianity Today ran a 2010 report headlined “Adoption is Everywhere,” illustrating the trend among churches and Christians who are giving “attention to orphans, adoption, the fatherless, and so on.”

Despite such efforts, the American orphan crisis remains. Too many churches still find it easier to stand behind a megaphone decrying the morality of laws than to stand beside a child in need.

Thousands of orphaned children in America need grandmas and grandpas, embarrassing uncles and crazy aunts. They need someone to teach them to fly a kite and throw a ball and read a book and tie their shoes. They need someone to call mom and dad.

In fairness, adopting a child is not easy and many of these children face difficult adjustments once they’re adopted. They have experienced pain, loss, hurt, confusion and misplaced trust. They have endured physical, emotional and sexual abuse — things most of us don’t even want to imagine.

In 2008, when my wife and I adopted through Bethany Christian Services, the organization educated us on the possible challenges of adopting a child. They informed us that even though our daughter was a baby when we brought her home, she would eventually ask tough questions, as would our friends and family.

But my wife and I know our faith demands action and that sometimes action takes us out of our comfort zone.

As a father of three — two biological children and an adopted child — and a host to a number of children that have needed a temporary home I can tell you these kids need less arguing over who should and should not be allowed to adopt and more families stepping up and saying, “we will adopt.”

It is time Christians decide to either step up or shut up. If a Christian group wants to wade into the discussion over who should adopt, it needs to put its money and manpower where its mouth is.

That means not only challenging families and churches to adopt from foster care (which costs virtually nothing financially) but also to adopt children resulting from unplanned pregnancies, children with special needs and children of mixed race or minority ethnicity.

If Christians’ only desire is to fight the culture wars and score political points, then they should continue to lean on empty rhetoric. But if they truly care about the family and the Bible, they’ll begin caring for children who desperately need a home.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Jason Locy.

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Christianity • Opinion • Politics

soundoff (708 Responses)
  1. SmartPotato

    The bigotry and hypocrisy rampant amongst "religious" people is not only terrifying, but denying thousands of orphans homes. It makes me sick.

    July 8, 2011 at 1:35 pm |
  2. ThinkTank

    If you want to be pro-life=you must adopt. I think that should be a nice tie. Lets see how many people will be running to the adoption centers then and blurting out their pro=life propaganda.

    And back to the Arkansas issue at hand:
    What is the difference between a Taliban or Moslem telling their women can only marry certain men or go out with a man's permission?
    and Christin Fundamentalist telling their people they can only marry certain people (straight) and they cannot adopt a child into a house with someone thats gay?

    No difference. Both groups are extremists, and they are the same masking it as "religion". Puppets.

    July 8, 2011 at 12:15 pm |
  3. jambones

    Christians are horrible but gays are even worse. They do not act normal. Most gay guys are prissy little babies, if they were straight they would be teased and had "their balls busted" about the way they act, dress, talk and the music they like. But they feel they are the same as us but they are not in any way. Being gay is not natural, it is an crime on humanity, our race would die out if we all turned gay, enough said-not natural. We tolerate these freak shows and their ridiculous life styles. We should not let them adopt children. I wish this county would divide up or let states make laws so as citizens we could choose where to live instead of having the Feds try to control every state. Trying to force all together is not going to work, it will result in escalating violence ultimately leading to a violent fight for freedom

    July 8, 2011 at 11:38 am |
    • SmartPotato

      You're a bigoted moron. So do women; are they supposed to "man up"?

      July 8, 2011 at 1:12 pm |
    • Paul in Louisville

      Wow...jambones comments is easily the most moronic comment I have ever read on "the Internets." I know a couple of bars I'd love to drop jambones into and ask him to call them "prissy." I'm guessing he or she would be lucky to get out alive. Anyone thinking the gay stereotype is the norm when it comes to gay men is simply stupid.

      Oh, and I guess lesbians don't even enter the picture for more, ignorant jambones.

      July 8, 2011 at 1:24 pm |
    • kpete

      would you PLEASE define for me what normal is in our society? Actually I'll answer that myself. THERE IS NO SENSE OF NORMAL in our society. Read a freaking sociology or psychopathology book for once and realize there is no set standard for what is normal and not normal in our society.

      July 8, 2011 at 2:07 pm |
    • Joleen

      Those were a lot of controls advocated right before the "violent fight for freedom" comment.

      July 10, 2011 at 5:30 am |
  4. Bribarian

    Another CNN assault on christianity. Christians don't adopt because they mostly have respectable families where they actually have the children and, get this, they take care of them.

    July 7, 2011 at 2:55 pm |
    • Lucy

      Are you a total moron? Christians have respectable families...really....funny....really funny....considering that majority of molestors, murders and child killers came from "christian" families...your response is laughable. Every religion and every family is dysfunctional to some degree.

      July 7, 2011 at 3:24 pm |
    • camiwa

      Did you miss the point of the article? He's saying if you don't adopt, that's fine; but don't prevent these children from going to other households that may want them.

      Why would you prevent a child from joining a loving home (even though it may be different from what you consider to be a loving home) and condemn them to years of foster care because of YOUR religious beliefs. And I guess you missed those parts in the bible that talked about helping others, and giving to the less fortunate.

      July 8, 2011 at 12:30 pm |
    • SmartPotato

      Bah ha! Right! And forcing children into believing they'll burn in hell for masturbating ISN'T child abuse. You're a moron.

      July 8, 2011 at 1:13 pm |
    • Joleen

      Christians don't adopt because they are moral? No kidding. So if it is immoral to adopt, I guess you should be okay with gays and lesbians adopting then? What's the fuss?

      July 10, 2011 at 5:32 am |
  5. pj

    I adopted five. Is that enough for you? Christians in my Church are adopting a lot of kids. Of course they are quietly going about their business as the bible tells us to, so you won't hear a thing about it. We have a support group for people who have adopted – that's how many we have.
    Have YOU adopted any kids?

    July 6, 2011 at 7:24 pm |
    • Mama2KOA

      are you saying "you" in general? because if you were asking the author, then I'd have to say you hadnt read the article since it clearly stated that he and his wife had adopted one of their children.

      July 7, 2011 at 6:29 pm |
    • Joleen

      Heck I had three dozen foster kids. So? I had the most fun with them. I have an adopted grandaughter. Whatever. I talk about it sometimes so people don't get so weird about it. Even kids with "problems" provide more fun and love than problems.

      July 10, 2011 at 5:35 am |
  6. Tom

    Crusades (cont.)...

    Crusades (1095-1291)

    Estimated totals of murders by Christian Crusaders:

    Wertham: 1,000,000

    Charles Mackay, Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the
    Madness of Crowds (1841): 2,000,000 Europeans killed.

    Aletheia, The Rationalist's Manual: 5,000,000

    Individual Events:

    Davies: Crusaders killed up to 8,000 Jews in Rhineland

    Paul Johnson A History of the Jews (1987): 1,000 Jewish women in
    Rhineland comm. suicide to avoid the mob, 1096.

    Gibbon, Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, v.5, 6

    1st Crusade: 300,000 Eur. k at Battle of Nice [Nicea].

    Crusaders vs. Solimon of Roum: 4,000 Christians, 3,000 Moslems

    1098, Fall of Antioch: 100,000 Moslems massacred.

    50,000 Pilgrims died of disease.

    1099, Fall of Jerusalem: 70,000 Moslems massacred.

    Siege of Tiberias: 30,000 Christians k.

    Siege of Tyre: 1,000 Turks

    Richard the Lionhearted executes 3,000 Moslem POWs.

    1291: 100,000 Christians k after fall of Acre.

    Fall of Christian Antioch: 17,000 massacred.

    [TOTAL: 677,000 listed in these episodes here.]

    Catholic Encyclopedia (1910)

    Jaffa: 20,000 Christians massacred, 1197

    Sorokin estimates that French, English & Imperial German Crusaders lost
    a total of 3,600 in battle.

    1st C (1096-99): 400

    2nd C (1147-49): 750

    3rd C (1189-91): 930

    4th C (1202-04): 120

    5th C (1228-29): 600

    7th C (1248-54): 700

    James Trager, The People's Chronology (1992)

    1099: Crusaders slaughter 40,000 inhabs of Jerusalem. Dis/starv reduced
    Crusaders from 300,000 to 60,000.

    1147: 2nd Crusades begins with 500,000. "Most" lost to
    starv./disease/battle.

    1190: 500 Jews massacred in York.

    1192: 3rd Crusade reduced from 100,000 to 5,000 through famine, plagues and
    desertions in campaign vs Antioch.

    1212: Children's Crusade loses some 50,000.

    [TOTAL: Just in these incidents, it appears the Europeans lost around
    650,000.]

    TOTAL: When I take all the individual death tolls listed here, weed out
    the duplicates, fill in the blanks, apply Occam ("Pluralitas non est
    ponenda sine necessitate"), etc. I get a very rough total of 1½ M
    deaths in the Crusades.

    July 6, 2011 at 12:12 pm |
    • Kevin Haislip

      Tom, your point is well taken. Even today, we see churches and leaders maliciously hurting people to make themselves look good. The ministries I have been involved in these last decades have always been undermined not by legitamate concerns but by people in the church who care more about their own concerns than the call of Christ to reach the lost. My wife and I have adopted 13 children, most special needs. The issue is that people either don't read their Bibles to know what our calling is (love and discipling and caring for the needs of others) or they don't read it and allow God to move them into those areas in their lives. They are well studied, but not doers. The early church was very much a doing church. When any organization, including the church allows heirachies, it always becomes corrupt and falls away from it's true purpose.

      July 6, 2011 at 12:49 pm |
    • Bill the Cat

      Your figures are terrible. Rodney Stark, professor of social sciences at Baylor University and author of the new book God's Battalions: the Case for the Crusades, explains the motives and realities of the Crusades. I suggest taking a read.

      July 6, 2011 at 12:51 pm |
    • Bill the Cat

      Oh, and the Khmer Rouge killed just as many in 4 years as your list of almost 1600 years.

      July 6, 2011 at 1:03 pm |
  7. albert f. maas

    Ehjay,

    My question was meant to be rhetorical. Your Jesus never existed. The "Big Bang" and evolution are scientific theories backed up by facts and evidence. Mother Theresa was no saint. She thought all the poor, sick and dying should suffer to make Jesus happy. Darwinism and the "Big Bang" theory are not philosophy. If or when you graduate high school you might want to read some books on philosophy,physics and biology.

    July 6, 2011 at 10:36 am |
    • Bill the Cat

      Jesus never existed? HAHAHAHA!!! What a joke!! I can't believe this nonsense is still parroted by you gullible dupes!!

      July 6, 2011 at 12:52 pm |
    • vforba

      That's interesting how you state that "Big Bang" and "Evolution" THEORIES that are backed up by proof. That's a very entertaining thought. Seeing as how they are still called theories and they are most certainly not proven.

      July 7, 2011 at 3:53 pm |
    • kpete

      Evolution and the Big Bang theories do not disprove the existence of Jesus. Whether you believe in God or not. Jesus was still a real person. Now whether he was actually of divine descent is where you may be confused or refuse to believe it. But he was real.

      July 8, 2011 at 2:15 pm |
  8. albert f. maas

    Why didn't Jesus adopt an orphan? I am sure there were quite a few around in first century Judea.

    July 5, 2011 at 9:32 pm |
    • ehjay

      Perhaps it was the fact that he knew how short his life would be and that the child would suffer being orphaned again. Life demands that choices are made to serve a greater good or one's self. Mother Theresa helped many but you would prpobably ask why didn't she adopt? Your question is inane showing that you probably hold a philosophy represented by Big Bang and Darwinism.

      July 6, 2011 at 5:01 am |
    • SmartPotato

      Probably because he was murdered by his own "God-fearin'" peeps? Just a thought.

      July 8, 2011 at 1:15 pm |
  9. Sabrina

    What exactly is this guy's beef? There are Christian adoption agencies out there, so it's not like Christians don't adopt. If that guy bothered to study his history, he'd realize that Christians have a long history of helping the less fortunate. It was Christians who founded many of the orphanages and charities in this nation as well as in Europe. It was CHRISTIANS who were taking in orphans and infants that were abandoned even back in the days of the Ancient Greek and Roman Empires. So his accusations are completely invalid.

    July 5, 2011 at 5:00 pm |
    • ehjay

      Aside from a possible personal *look at me" motive, I think his beef is that Christians could do more, but aren't. He is right about that. Tangental to this discussion of America's Christians I would comment on the context in which the Muslim terrorists scream infidels at Western society. The term has profundity. .Fidelity is faithfulness and in their context it means the West is not faithful to God. Muslims, Jews, Christians are all descended from Noah and worship the same God, each by a different name. Live for a while in a Muslim nation and you will appreciate that their devotion to God is unrivaled in our world. The Jihadists are somwhat akin to the ancient Christian Crusaders. Christians are much too tolerant of Sin and other failings within the culture, even America agrees on that..

      July 6, 2011 at 5:30 am |
    • ehjay

      In Islam, rescuing an orphaned child is a guaranteed way to receive salvation on the Day of Judgment and be near to the Holy Prophet Muhammad (s) who said:

      “The best house among the Muslims is the house in which orphans are well treated. The worst house among the Muslims is the house in which orphans are ill-treated. I and the guardian of the orphan will be in the Garden like that,” indicating his two fingers. (Abu Huraira)

      July 6, 2011 at 5:44 am |
    • Derrick

      After reading a good number of responses I am floored by the number of people that seemed to have missed the point of this article. The article is well written and his motivation was based off of the extreme churches/pastors that, "erupted" due to the decision in AR. All the author is saying is that if you are so thankful that a gay/lesbian couple cannot provide a home for a child than what are you going to do to make sure these children have a home? He continues to show that the christian community has the resources to eradicate this issue in the US. Who are we to be excited about an AR verdict that doesn't allow cohabitating straight and gay couples from adopting orphaned children when we are not willing to step up to adopt these children? That is the authors point.

      July 6, 2011 at 7:59 am |
    • FX

      Sabrina – that is where you are ever so wrong. While there are christian adoption agencies the majority of so called christian's don't adopt. If you were to take a hard and especially an honest look at those groups who protest adoption by gays and who constantly rail against abortion you would find damned few adoptive parents in either group. What is needed are more people who actually care about the children and not about making some political point. Many, although certainly not all, women seeking an abortion do so because they realize that they are neither emotionally, fiscally, nor physically able to care and provide for a child. Unfortunately there isn't an adequate support structure in this country to provide for all of the unwanted children that will give them the nurturing and stable family structure they need and the orphanages and adoption agencies in this nation fall woefully short in both areas.

      July 6, 2011 at 11:38 am |
    • Tim

      Non christians have a long history of helping people and adopting children as well Sabrina. On the other hand, more people have been killed in the name of religion than for any other cause...

      July 6, 2011 at 11:53 am |
    • Landau

      Remember how the Christians helped all the Muslim children by lopping their heads off during the crusades, or how they helped women they labeled as witches in Salem? Yeah, good thing Christians have the exclusive monopoly on the task of helping folks.

      July 6, 2011 at 11:55 am |
    • Tom

      Sabrina are you kidding or what? Here are some facts for you about those good old days you refer too...

      As soon as Christianity became legal in the Roman Empire by imperial edict (315), more and more pagan temples were destroyed by Christian mob. Pagan priests were killed.

      Between 315 and 6th century thousands of pagan believers were slain by Christians.

      Examples of destroyed Temples: the Sanctuary of Aesculap in Aegaea, the Temple of Aphrodite in Golgatha, Aphaka in Lebanon, the Heliopolis.

      Christian priests such as Mark of Arethusa or Cyrill of Heliopolis were famous as "temple destroyer."
      Pagan services became punishable by death in 356.

      Christian Emperor Theodosius (408-450) even had children executed, because they had been playing with remains of pagan statues. According to Christian chroniclers he "followed meticulously all Christian teachings..." In 6th century pagans were declared void of all rights. In the early fourth century the philosopher Sopatros was executed on demand of Christian authorities. The world famous female philosopher Hypatia of Alexandria was torn to pieces with glass fragments by a hysterical Christian mob led by a Christian minister named Peter, in a church, in 415.

      July 6, 2011 at 12:02 pm |
    • Tom

      The Mission Period Christian History:

      Emperor Karl (Charlemagne) in 782 had 4500 Saxons, unwilling to convert to Christianity, beheaded.
      Peasants of Steding (Germany) unwilling to pay suffocating church taxes: between 5,000 and 11,000 men, women and children slain 5/27/1234 near Altenesch/Germany.

      15th century Poland: 1019 churches and 17987 villages plundered by Knights of the Order. Number of victims unknown.

      16th and 17th century Ireland. English troops "pacified and civilized" Ireland, where only Gaelic "wild Irish", "unreasonable beasts lived without any knowledge of God or good manners, in common of their goods, cattle, women, children and every other thing." One of the more successful soldiers, a certain Humphrey Gilbert, half-brother of Sir Walter Raleigh, ordered that "the heddes of all those (of what sort soever thei were) which were killed in the daie, should be cutte off from their bodies... and should bee laied on the ground by eche side of the waie", which effort to civilize the Irish indeed caused "greate terrour to the people when thei sawe the heddes of their dedde fathers, brothers, children, kinsfolke, and freinds on the grounde". Tens of thousands of Gaelic Irish fell victim to the carnage.

      July 6, 2011 at 12:06 pm |
    • Tom

      Crusades (cont.)...

      Crusades (1095-1291)

      Estimated totals of murders by Christian Crusaders:

      Wertham: 1,000,000

      Charles Mackay, Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the
      Madness of Crowds (1841): 2,000,000 Europeans killed.

      Aletheia, The Rationalist's Manual: 5,000,000

      Individual Events:

      Davies: Crusaders killed up to 8,000 Jews in Rhineland

      Paul Johnson A History of the Jews (1987): 1,000 Jewish women in
      Rhineland comm. suicide to avoid the mob, 1096.

      Gibbon, Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, v.5, 6

      1st Crusade: 300,000 Eur. k at Battle of Nice [Nicea].

      Crusaders vs. Solimon of Roum: 4,000 Christians, 3,000 Moslems

      1098, Fall of Antioch: 100,000 Moslems massacred.

      50,000 Pilgrims died of disease.

      1099, Fall of Jerusalem: 70,000 Moslems massacred.

      Siege of Tiberias: 30,000 Christians k.

      Siege of Tyre: 1,000 Turks

      Richard the Lionhearted executes 3,000 Moslem POWs.

      1291: 100,000 Christians k after fall of Acre.

      Fall of Christian Antioch: 17,000 massacred.

      [TOTAL: 677,000 listed in these episodes here.]

      Catholic Encyclopedia (1910)

      Jaffa: 20,000 Christians massacred, 1197

      Sorokin estimates that French, English & Imperial German Crusaders lost
      a total of 3,600 in battle.

      1st C (1096-99): 400

      2nd C (1147-49): 750

      3rd C (1189-91): 930

      4th C (1202-04): 120

      5th C (1228-29): 600

      7th C (1248-54): 700

      James Trager, The People's Chronology (1992)

      1099: Crusaders slaughter 40,000 inhabs of Jerusalem. Dis/starv reduced
      Crusaders from 300,000 to 60,000.

      1147: 2nd Crusades begins with 500,000. "Most" lost to
      starv./disease/battle.

      1190: 500 Jews massacred in York.

      1192: 3rd Crusade reduced from 100,000 to 5,000 through famine, plagues and
      desertions in campaign vs Antioch.

      1212: Children's Crusade loses some 50,000.

      [TOTAL: Just in these incidents, it appears the Europeans lost around
      650,000.]

      TOTAL: When I take all the individual death tolls listed here, weed out
      the duplicates, fill in the blanks, apply Occam ("Pluralitas non est
      ponenda sine necessitate"), etc. I get a very rough total of 1½ M
      deaths in the Crusades.

      July 6, 2011 at 12:13 pm |
    • Tom

      "Heretics and Atheists".... (how Christians historically dealt with non believers)

      Already in 385 C.E. the first Christians, the Spanish Priscillianus and six followers, were beheaded for heresy in Trier/Germany

      Manichaean heresy: a crypto-Christian sect decent enough to practice birth control (and thus not as irresponsible as faithful Catholics) was exterminated in huge campaigns all over the Roman empire between 372 C.E. and 444 C.E. Numerous thousands of victims.

      Albigensians: the first Crusade intended to slay other Christians.
      The Albigensians (Cathars) viewed themselves as good Christians, but would not accept Roman Catholic rule, and taxes, and prohibition of birth control.

      Begin of violence: on command of pope Innocent III (the greatest single mass murderer prior to the Nazi era) in 1209. Beziérs (today France) 7/22/1209 destroyed, all the inhabitants were slaughtered. Number of victims (including Catholics refusing to turn over their heretic neighbors and friends) estimated between 20,000-70,000.

      Carcassonne 8/15/1209, thousands slain. Other cities followed. Subsequent 20 years of war until nearly all Cathars (probably half the population of the Languedoc, today southern France) were exterminated. After the war ended (1229) the Inquisition was founded 1232 to search and destroy surviving/hiding heretics. Last Cathars burned at the stake 1324.

      Estimated one million victims (Cathar heresy alone)
      Other heresies: Waldensians, Paulikians, Runcarians, Josephites, and many others. Most of these sects exterminated, (I believe some Waldensians live today, yet they had to endure 600 years of persecution) I estimate at least hundred thousand victims (including the Spanish inquisition but excluding victims in the New World).

      Spanish Inquisitor Torquemada, a former Dominican friar, allegedly was responsible for 10,220 burnings.

      John Huss, a critic of papal infallibility and indulgences, was burned at the stake in 1415.

      Michael Sattler, leader of a baptist community, was burned at the stake in Rottenburg, Germany, May 20, 1527. Several days later his wife and other follwers were also executed.

      University professor B.Hubmaier burned at the stake 1538 in Vienna.

      Giordano Bruno, Dominican monk, after having been incarcerated for seven years, was burned at the stake for heresy on the Campo dei Fiori (Rome) on 2/17/1600. Thomas Aikenhead, a twenty-year-old scottish student of Edinburgh University, was hanged for atheism and blasphemy.

      July 6, 2011 at 12:20 pm |
    • Tom

      Witches:

      From the beginning of Christianity to 1484 probably more than several thousand so called "witches" burned or murdered.
      In the era of witch hunting (1484-1750) according to modern scholars several hundred thousand (about 80% female) burned at the stake or hanged.

      But Sabrina, I am sure right after the burning at the stake ceremony the Christians stopped by to adopt a child on their way home.

      July 6, 2011 at 12:22 pm |
    • Tom

      Religious Wars:

      15th century: Crusades against Hussites, thousands slain.
      1538 pope Paul III declared Crusade against apostate England and all English as slaves of Church (fortunately had not power to go into action).
      1568 Spanish Inquisition Tribunal ordered extermination of 3 million rebels in (then Spanish) Netherlands.
      Between 5000 and 6000 Protestants were drowned by Spanish Catholic Troops, "a disaster the burghers of Emden first realized when several thousand broad-brimmed Dutch hats floated by."
      1572 In France about 20,000 Huguenots were killed on command of pope Pius V. Until 17th century 200,000 flee.
      17th century: Catholics slay Gaspard de Coligny, a Protestant leader. After murdering him, the Catholic mob mutilated his body, "cutting off his head, his hands, and his genitals... and then dumped him into the river [...but] then, deciding that it was not worthy of being food for the fish, they hauled it out again [... and] dragged what was left ... to the gallows of Montfaulcon, 'to be meat and carrion for maggots and crows'."
      17th century: Catholics sack the city of Magdeburg/Germany: roughly 30,000 Protestants were slain. "In a single church fifty women were found beheaded," reported poet Friedrich Schiller, "and infants still sucking the breasts of their lifeless mothers."
      17th century 30 years' war (Catholic vs. Protestant): at least 40% of population decimated, mostly in Germany.

      July 6, 2011 at 12:24 pm |
    • Tom

      Jews:

      Already in the 4th and 5th centuries synagogues were burned by Christians.Number of Jews slain unknown.
      In the middle of the fourth century the first synagogue was destroyed on command of bishop Innocentius of Dertona in Northern Italy. The first synagogue known to have been burned down was near the river Euphrat, on command of the bishop of Kallinikon in the year 388.

      Council of Toledo: Jews were enslaved, their property confiscated, and their children forcibly baptized. [DA454]
      1010 The Bishop of Limoges (France) had the cities' Jews, who would not convert to Christianity, expelled or killed.

      1096 First Crusade: Thousands of Jews slaughtered, maybe 12.000 total. Places: Worms 5/18/1096, Mainz 5/27/1096 (1100 persons), Cologne, Neuss, Altenahr, Wevelinghoven, Xanten, Moers, Dortmund, Kerpen, Trier, Metz, Regensburg, Prag and others (All locations Germany except Metz/France, Prag/Czech) [EJ]
      1147 Second Crusade: Several hundred Jews were slain in Ham, Sully, Carentan, and Rameru (all locations in France).
      1189/90 Third Crusade: English Jewish communities sacked.
      1235, Fulda/Germany: 34 Jewish men and women slain.
      1257, 1267: Jewish communities of London, Canterbury, Northampton, Lincoln, Cambridge, and others exterminated.
      1290 Bohemia (Poland) allegedly 10,000 Jews killed.
      1337 Starting in Deggendorf/Germany a Jew-killing craze reaches 51 towns in Bavaria, Austria, Poland.
      1348 All Jews of Basel/Switzerland and Strasbourg/France (two thousand) burned.
      1349 In more than 350 towns in Germany all Jews murdered, mostly burned alive (in this one year more Jews were killed than Christians in 200 years of ancient Roman persecution of Christians).
      1389 In Prag 3,000 Jews were slaughtered.
      1391 Seville's Jews killed (Archbishop Martinez leading). 4,000 were slain, 25,000 sold as slaves. Their identification was made easy by the brightly colored "badges of shame" that all Jews above the age of ten had been forced to wear.
      1492 In the year Columbus set sail to conquer a New World, more than 150,000 Jews were expelled from Spain, many died on their way: 6/30/1492.
      1648 Chmielnitzki massacres: In Poland about 200,000 Jews were slain.

      July 6, 2011 at 12:27 pm |
    • Tom

      So Sabrina what is your problem? Besides ignoring history and science.

      July 6, 2011 at 12:37 pm |
    • Joleen

      I think his point is that there should be NO orphans in a predominantly Christian country. He is right. Just the Baptists are 138 to 1 on the total orphan population? I had foster kids, but never adopted. My son adopted one after growing up with fosters in the house (all of which he still claims as siblings). TRUE, THERE SHOULD BE NO ORPHANS IN A CHRISTIAN COUNTRY.

      July 10, 2011 at 5:40 am |
  10. Homeschool23

    I would adopt 6 right now if I had the money. The cost and red tape are outrageous. I am a stay at home, homeschooling mother. But the church will not pay for my adoptions because my husband is not "saved". We had 3 children and they are all Christians with a fantastic father and a Godly home because he is not anti-Christian but supports our life. But because we don't fall in the "Christian, 2 parents who are believers" view, no church would sponsor us. And there are 6 kids out there who could have watched us paint the chicken coop today, go to MeMa's for dinner on the dock and gone to sleep with "The Hobbit" ringing in there ears......
    So to call on the church to pay for adoptions is a narrow view. Call off the money hounds. Make it illegal to charge 30,000 to adopt a child. Make it where everyone can, even the good poor folk who may need a little help at the grocery store. Because the 2 Christian family homes are having their own kids trying to look like the Duggars. They don't want someone else's child unless they can't have kids.

    July 4, 2011 at 3:41 pm |
    • atheistreader

      Adoptions from foster care are free or darn close in most states. But you may not get the perfect infant you'd prefer. Of course, if you cannot afford to provide for the child, you should not adopt him or her. It makes no sense to adopt a child then ask for government assistance to raise him/her. I know this goes againts the "overpopulate the world" mentality of the fundamentalists, but really, just have as many children as you can actually affod to raise without taxpayer assistance.

      July 6, 2011 at 11:25 am |
  11. Mark

    I love how evil tries to tell Christians what to do. Never mind that Muslims do the same thing....no, it's the Christian's that are bearing the brunt of Satan's scorn.

    Be brave Christians. This too will pass. Once the evil is made clear will mankind realize their lunacy. For now, just realize that evil is loose on this world and has changed the minds of the weak and immoral. This will pass. stand firm in your resolve.

    July 2, 2011 at 11:24 pm |
    • soysauce

      ?? what on earth are you rambling on about...what is the point you're trying to make...what a bunch of babbling nonsense

      July 4, 2011 at 7:02 pm |
    • Rob

      Take the plank out of your own eye.

      July 5, 2011 at 1:21 pm |
    • Joleen

      Matthew:
      Then his master, after he had called him, said to him, ‘You wicked servant! I forgave you all that debt because you begged me. ‘Should you not also have had compassion on your fellow servant, just as I had pity on you?’ And his master was angry, and delivered him to the torturers until he should pay all that was due to him. So My heavenly Father also will do to you if each of you, from his heart, does not forgive his brother his trespasses.
      EVIL IS TELLING YOU TO ADOPT ORPHANS? WOW.

      July 10, 2011 at 5:58 am |
  12. Mitchell Moore

    ANYONE that is capable and wants to should be allowed to adopt, but thanks once again to the Christian evangelicals, they're trying their best to make sure no kids are raised by gays or lesbians. I'm so glad they didn't step in when my father died in prison and my mother was killed in a car accident when I was a kid, or me and my sister and brother wouldn't have been taken in by my gay uncle. He taught us how to be respectful and honest, helped us with our homework and made sure we did well in school. If it wasn't for his stern but loving encouragement, I never would've made into college. My uncle was a great dad so stop trying to kill it for other gays that want to be loving parents.

    July 1, 2011 at 3:39 pm |
    • CanadaLady

      Wow! Your comments about your uncle are lovely, and he must be very proud. Cheers

      July 2, 2011 at 10:16 am |
    • Sean F

      I'm sorry you grew up without your biological parents. Thank you for sharing your story, and that of your wonderful Uncle/father.

      July 4, 2011 at 12:58 pm |
    • SmartPotato

      Thank you for the post... I love your uncle! My brother has been trying to adopt, and even without a partner. He is a loving, kind man who would do great with children. The bigotry and hypocrisy rampant amongst "religious" people is not only terrifying, but denying thousands of orphans homes. It makes me sick.

      July 8, 2011 at 1:34 pm |
  13. Ima Back

    "I like your Christ. I do not like your Christians. They are so unlike your Christ" -Ghandi

    July 1, 2011 at 1:56 pm |
    • Just Me

      Amen!

      July 4, 2011 at 10:41 pm |
    • Joleen

      Ima, these cannot be Christians. If you ever read the Bible, you would know for a fact that they are NOT Christians. Jesus will deny them.

      July 10, 2011 at 6:00 am |
  14. Sarah W

    Most fortunately, the previous teaching pastor at my Southern Baptist church wrote a book on the biblical mandate to care for orphans and has adopted five of them himself. I could not agree more with this article; how hypocritical we can be.

    July 1, 2011 at 10:03 am |
  15. erin

    This is so good!
    "When Jesus asked Peter if he loved him, and Peter responded yes, Jesus didn’t tell him to picket the wolves. He told Peter to feed and tend his sheep."

    July 1, 2011 at 12:49 am |
  16. Cathy

    David, do you have a source for this information? If there are so few children needing a family, why do I hear so many stories of teens aging out of the foster care system?

    June 30, 2011 at 9:28 am |
    • Follower of Christ

      Because too many are wanting and adopting babies and healthy children. I agree with this article but return the challenge to you David. The real need is with older children and those with medical needs. China for example has a wait of 4-5 years for a baby while children with special needs (this includes cleft, birthmarks and many other manageable things) are sitting by waiting. There are grants and fees are waived for these children with special needs. Our son will need a kidney transplant but what a blessing God has given us with the insurance through my complany. I agree that we are falling short but I also put more stock in raising them spiritually than just physically.

      July 5, 2011 at 10:05 am |
  17. Kay

    I don't think the article has a focus. At first, I thought it was about the adoption of children by gay and straight singles who cohabitate, but it seems as though, the writer is just saying that nobody wants to adopt. I disagree on all sides of this article. First of all, I identify as a gay woman. I would love to adopt a child, but because of a very dangerous career choice I did not start my own family, nor did I think it was fair of me to adopt a child as if I could. I have heard lots of horror stories about even trying to adopt as a gay adult. It is sad, because now that I am retired at a young age, I could spend time as an at home mom with several adopted kids. Instead, I work to help children who have nothing through my Reaching Down Project. That's as close as I will get to having my own child. It is unfortunate, as a Christian, to hear the anti love for all of God's children. As if we as Christians have some authority to judge and rule. Please reread the handbook (i.e. the Bible) Thanks.

    June 30, 2011 at 8:18 am |
    • Chris

      I agree there is no focus, but food for thought none the less.

      July 6, 2011 at 7:04 am |
  18. LouisaF

    My aunt arranged for her troubled youngest daughter to have three abortions when she was in her teens. Then she had a late mid-life conversion back to the fundie religion she left 3 decades earlier because they didn't approve of divorce and she wanted one, and now she's firmly "pro-life." That's how anti-abortionists roll.

    June 29, 2011 at 11:33 pm |
    • Dave

      And obviously that is exactly the back story to every single pro-lifer, amirite?

      July 1, 2011 at 3:17 pm |
    • Lucas

      , Everyone has the opportunity to be great, becasue everyone has the opportunity to serve. That was, in essence, what Jesus was telling His disciples about greatness. It's available to everyone in His kingdom, not a select few, and it is characterized by a heart of service.Max Lucado has a great book, A Love Worth Giving, that lays out the underlying motivation for a heart of service. Once I realized how much God loves me, cherishes me, and provides for me, I couldn't help but start lavishing that love on the world around me.I asked the Lord to show me how to love the people at my job and He gave me a very simple idea wash their dishes. You know those mouldering coffee mugs and encrusted utensils that languish in the office sink next to the coffee maker and the microwave. I came in early for my shift and started washing the dishes. I was tucked away in a corner, behind a door, but suddenly I was on center stage. Everyone wanted to know what I was doing and why.One co-worker was angry and accused me of enabling . The irony was, I was washing some of this person's dishes. I kept my mouth shut (quite a feat!) and just apologized to the Lord. How many times have I fumed at Him when He was cleaning up my own messes.They kept asking me why I was doing this. These weren't my dishes. It wasn't my responsibility. I didn't know what to tell them, how to explain that I was being obedient to the Lord. So I said, God loves me so much, I just wanted to share that love with everyone here and I thought this would be a good way to start. I wash the dishes most every day and it brings me such joy to share God's love in this little way. I have heard parts of this series Good To Great in God's Eyes and I look forward to going through it fully. I want to learn how to be great in God's eyes.

      September 7, 2012 at 2:29 am |
  19. kevin

    Jason is a complete idiot and an obvious Christian-basher based on his premis. I'm a Christian and the adoptive father of two special needs children. Most adoption agencies in this country are Faith-Based Christian organizations. It never fails to amaze me when an anti-Crhistian liberal like this looser takes an important social issue like adoption and uses it as a stick to beat up Christians. He should be ashamed of himself, but instead he's just feels a self-satisfaction for putting Christians in their place.

    June 29, 2011 at 11:13 pm |
    • lhays

      Kevin, if you re-read the article, you'll see that Jason says he IS a Christian. Perhaps he's just having an identify crisis, putting himself in his place?

      July 1, 2011 at 12:23 pm |
    • Dave

      Yeah, got to watch out for those "loosers," they are bad news!

      July 1, 2011 at 3:18 pm |
    • Ramiel

      Hey Kevin, you're a complete idiot and someone who obviously can't take the time to read closely enough.

      He's not anti-Christian – he's dismayed at his fellow Christians all too often being hypocritical (here, bashing gays from adopting, yet not enough encouragement towards adopting of their own).

      Why so serious, Kevin? You jumped to conclusions.

      July 2, 2011 at 1:22 am |
    • wtrcat

      arent christians supposed to be peaceful and turn the other cheek? all I see is angry aggressive behavior...keep it up..your making yourselves and your religion very unpopular...

      July 3, 2011 at 12:07 pm |
    • Rob

      And I think your defensive because you know the author has a point.

      July 5, 2011 at 1:33 pm |
  20. Ashlyn

    "Jesus didn't tell [Peter] to picket the wolves." Very well said!

    June 29, 2011 at 3:54 pm |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.