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June 17th, 2011
05:00 AM ET

Missionaries tapping portable satellite technology in remote outposts

By John Couwels, CNN

Orlando, Florida (CNN) - Christian missionaries have been traveling to remote regions around the world for centuries to spread, as they would describe it, the good news of Jesus Christ.

But now a tiny plastic and metal device packed with cutting-edge technology attached to a computer could accelerate the pace of spreading that news - like an answer to prayer.

The answer has come in the form of a satellite terminal that is smaller than a laptop computer. The device, a BGAN satellite terminal, brings the Internet to some of the most remote parts of the world.

Corporations, governments and television networks have used BGAN devices for years to communicate by e-mail, phones or to broadcast live video signals from remote locations.

Wycliffe Bible Translators has only just begun distributing these devices to translators and linguists working to translate the Bible into every spoken language.

Wycliffe's goal is the same today as that of their founder, Cameron Townsend, 80 years ago: translate the Bible into the language of indigenous people everywhere.

With approximately 6,900 languages in the world, the satellite terminal is expected to cut in half the amount of time left to translate the remaining 2,000-plus languages Wycliffe is working on or hopes to be working on soon.

"It has increased the speed we thought it was going to take, 150 years. ... It's now going to be 2038 when it's completed," said Wycliffe's president and chief executive officer, Bob Creson.

Translators in the field can now communicate with linguists through e-mail on the satellite terminal, eliminating the huge amount of time needed to travel back and forth from district or regional offices.

Townsend found in 1917 while selling Spanish-language Bibles in Guatemala that a large majority of villagers throughout the countryside did not speak or read Spanish, the majority language of South America.

Townsend worked for more than a decade in a Mayan village in Guatemala learning the native language, Cakchiquel, creating an alphabet for it for the first time, and translating a Bible into the language.

Thus Wycliffe Bible Translators began, named after John Wycliffe, who in the 14th century translated the Bible into English, the language of the British working class.

Wycliffe translation coordinator Pedro Samuc - who grew up speaking Tzutujil, an indigenous Guatemalan Mayan language - says hearing the Bible in his native language has had a profound impact.

"When an indigenous person hears the message in their language, they understand that God loves them. ... It raises our self-esteem," especially after years of discrimination for just being indigenous, Samuc said through a translator.

"He loves us all the same," he said.

Burchrum Gail grew up speaking Jamaican Creole, or Patwa. As a Wycliffe translation coordinator in Jamaica, Gail agrees hearing the Bible in his native language generates a strong reaction.

"It validates me as a person. It also makes the scripture resonate more with me," he said.

"Whenever I hear God's word in my language, which has (had) such negative associations, it lifts me up and puts me on a level playing field with people who have the Bible in English, French or these prestigious European languages," Gail continued. The translation in his native tongue makes him want to "spread the word of God."

Samuc said he joined a translation project in Guatemala that began decades ago to translate the Bible into 22 Mayan languages, which have multiple dialects. So far the New Testament has been translated into 50 Mayan dialects. Only three remain, and Samuc said they will be completed in the next three years.

Wycliffe recently celebrated the "beginning of the end" for translation in the Americas, Creson said.

The average New Testament translation time has gone from 25 years down to seven thanks to the technological advancements, he said. "Those of us who understand Bible translation are saying that is really a big deal."

Wycliffe Bible Translators has only begun to distribute the satellite terminals to translators working in remote locations.

"This is a satellite system," said Bruce Smith with Wycliffe Associates. "You point up at the satellite and it works better than your Internet connection at home"

In some locations without electricity, solar panels are laid out in the sun to charge the batteries for the satellite terminal and computer.

Twenty-five more terminals will be deployed to Nigeria in June, said Smith, who helps deliver the units and train people how to use them.

"We are committed to alleviating Bible poverty in this generation," Creson said.

"And there is going to be a generation of people who are going to hear this good news message. That we're committed to, that they are not going to pass into eternity without ever hearing it."

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Christianity • Florida • Missionaries • Technology • United States

soundoff (97 Responses)
  1. bob

    funny how religions uses tech when it suits them . then bash on science every chance they get

    June 17, 2011 at 4:30 pm |
    • rhs98

      That's a really broad statement. Most faiths do disagree with descent from a common ancestor, but I don't see them "bashing science every chance they get".

      June 17, 2011 at 4:53 pm |
    • Q

      @rhs98 – Well, to "disagree with common ancestry" is very much "bashing science" in that it is essentially an affirmation of disagreement with the foundational tenets of not only biology, but every other relevant scientific discipline (e.g. physics, chemistry, geology, etc). One who disagrees with common ancestry is effectively stating that the whole practice of science is so severely flawed that is is practically useless.

      June 18, 2011 at 12:09 am |
    • rhs98

      Not in the sense that Bob is talking about. Science has produced television, air conditioning, microphones, automobiles, and countless other technologies that believers and unbelievers use every day. These advances were not made on a belief in a common ancestor.

      June 18, 2011 at 11:06 am |
  2. Judith

    Sticks and stones may break my bones but words–translated or otherwise–can never help me.

    June 17, 2011 at 4:27 pm |
  3. LynnethAnn

    According to Jason David BeDuhn, (http://jan.ucc.nau.edu/~jdb8/jason-cv1.htm)
    in his book Truth in Translation (http://www.amazon.com/Truth-Translation-Accuracy-Translations-Testament/dp/0761825568) after an analysis of 9 commonly used translations of the Bible, the most accurate one is the New World Translation. You can read that translation online at:

    http://watchtower.org/e/bible/index.htm

    June 17, 2011 at 4:24 pm |
  4. common sense

    why is this bs even on cnn? it's fantasy. why don't they post front page stories about mormonism or muslim? stop shoving this christian cr*p down our throats. why don't you just post stories from the Harry Potter books??

    June 17, 2011 at 4:16 pm |
    • Cristohoy

      Because Jesus Christ is more important than any other writer. He gives you eternal salvation, others just a moment of distraction.

      Look for Jesus before is too late!

      June 17, 2011 at 4:41 pm |
  5. Byrd

    Let'ss ee, Christchurch in New Zealand whacked by earthquakes; they've evacuated parts of, Waycross, Georgia in the US, where the swamp is currently on fire, and fire and tornadoes sweep states across the red states of this nation.

    Looks as though the symbols for this false Christ/god you've been worshiping are falling to ashes. It's about Time.

    June 17, 2011 at 4:10 pm |
  6. fasteddie

    How about translating the Bible so that it makes some kind of sense?

    June 17, 2011 at 3:58 pm |
    • numbnut

      We would probably get a million different translations. It's like this big riddle, hard to figure out what the heck is being said.

      June 17, 2011 at 4:30 pm |
  7. TOdd

    They should worry about translating the real Bible instead of worrying about far flung people who have never heard of the Bible.When will we ever get the true translation of the Bible without the Catholics and the Vatican interfering?NEVER ! Because they do not want the people to know the truth of the Bible because it would undermine the very foundation of the church.These people should truly wait to brainwash these people until we know what the Bible really says.

    June 17, 2011 at 3:51 pm |
  8. Robert Cadalso

    Great, let's poison more people.

    June 17, 2011 at 3:49 pm |
  9. Frogist

    This technology is impressive. It is so far reaching and can help us learn about other cultures and record the languages of indigenous peoples. That's so important when languages like patwa are dying out with older generations. I'm so glad that languages are being preserved even if it was not the main thrust of this organization.
    But I suppose the main problem with introducing outsiders who bring their technology and religion is that it must affect the culture of the native people. It is something that anthropologists try to avoid doing. Unfortunately it is not something missionaries generally are concerned about. In fact, introducing an outsider's morality serves to destroy a culture more than aid it. I worry about those on the receiving end of these translated bibles.
    I understand the feeling of worth when something you identify with is incorporated into something bigger or outside of yourself. But when that thing also could cost your ident!ty, it becomes a thing to be wary of.

    June 17, 2011 at 2:46 pm |
    • geobrandi

      Nothing like americanizing the world. 😦

      June 17, 2011 at 3:50 pm |
    • george in texas

      there is really no difference between columbian drug lords pushing drugs that have destroyed so many american families and the bible pushing missionaries abroad, supported by american churches. the dead sea scrolls have already proved that jesus is/was a hoax and bible is/was plagiarized from a fanatical jewish tribe of old palestine. the vatican's money sources in europe are drying up, and it is looking for state patronage in illiterate or semi literate societies and countries that can be easily conned.

      June 17, 2011 at 3:55 pm |
    • rhs98

      @ George in Texas – Just curious, which of the Dead Sea Scrolls has proven that Jesus was/is a hoax?

      June 17, 2011 at 4:10 pm |
    • bluecrabz

      Tell us what you know about the Dead Sea Scrolls, George. And what tribe was that that supposedly falsified the Bible? Just curious.

      June 17, 2011 at 4:34 pm |
    • Cristohoy

      george in Texas:
      it is COLOMBIAN lords.
      When Jesus come your knees are going to shake. Look for him and stop assuming that you know everything. Be humble!!

      June 17, 2011 at 4:49 pm |
    • John Richardson

      @Cristohoy If Jesus really came, I'm quite it would be the people who are proud as peaco-cks in proclaiming their own salvation whose knees would be shaking most.

      June 17, 2011 at 7:43 pm |
  10. Ed Lauber

    No comments here from the recipients. It would be instructive to hear their points of view. I sat with a Ghanaian academic as he refuted the ideas of westerners that the work of Bible translation was unnecessary or harmful. He was genuinely surprised about their opinions because he always saw translation into Ghanaian languages as a good thing. The same goes for Dr. Lamin Sanneh of Yale, who has written academic articles showing the Bible translation is a good thing. So, while the opinions of we westerners is also valid, it should be the peoples of Africa and Asia who have the final word in whether Bible translation is something they find helpful or not.

    June 17, 2011 at 2:34 pm |
    • Frogist

      @Ed: I think I would agree that with the Ghanian. Translating the book itself is not harmful. Access to knowledge is important and language is a real barrier to that. Reading the bible is not indoctrinating the Bible. The problems come up when missionaries push their religion on people in their daily lives. "You have to wear clothes like mine because indecency is sinful. You have to pray to my god before you eat because he gives you the food. You can't do your own religious rituals because you will make my god angry." Those things have a cultural impact that could be devastating.

      June 17, 2011 at 2:58 pm |
  11. David Johnson

    Isn't it ironic, that cutting edge technology would be used to spread Bronze Age mythology?

    Cheers!

    June 17, 2011 at 12:45 pm |
    • Lanfear

      LOL David Johnson... I love you

      June 17, 2011 at 3:51 pm |
    • Geraard

      "Isn't it ironic, that cutting edge technology would be used to spread Bronze Age mythology?"

      Post of the millenia!

      June 17, 2011 at 3:51 pm |
    • frank

      hahaha

      June 17, 2011 at 5:22 pm |
  12. James Black

    [youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aGSvqMBj-ig&w=640&h=360]

    June 17, 2011 at 9:54 am |
  13. Reality

    The real news about Jesus Christ:

    An essential reiteration-

    Jesus was an illiterate. Jewish peasant/carpenter/simple preacher man who suffered from hallucinations (or “mythicizing” from P, M, M, L and J) and who has been characterized anywhere from the Messiah from Nazareth to a mythical character from mythical Nazareth to a ma-mzer from Nazareth (Professor Bruce Chilton, in his book Rabbi Jesus). An-alyses of Jesus’ life by many contemporary NT scholars (e.g. Professors Crossan, Borg and Fredriksen, ) via the NT and related doc-uments have concluded that only about 30% of Jesus' sayings and ways noted in the NT were authentic. The rest being embellishments (e.g. miracles)/hallucinations made/had by the NT authors to impress various Christian, Jewish and Pagan sects.

    The 30% of the NT that is "authentic Jesus" like everything in life was borrowed/plagiarized and/or improved from those who came before. In Jesus' case, it was the ways and sayings of the Babylonians, Greeks, Persians, Egyptians, Hitt-ites, Canaanites, OT, John the Baptizer and possibly the ways and sayings of traveling Greek Cynics.
    earlychristianwritings.com/theories.html

    For added "pizzazz", Catholic theologians divided god the singularity into three persons and invented atonement as an added guilt trip for the "pew people" to go along with this trinity of overseers. By doing so, they made god the padre into god the "filicider".

    Current RCC problems:

    Pedophiliac priests, an all-male, mostly white hierarchy, atonement theology and original sin!!!!

    Luther, Calvin, Joe Smith, Henry VIII, Wesley, Roger Williams, the Great “Babs” et al, founders of Christian-based religions or combination religions also suffered from the belief in/hallucinations of "pretty wingie thingie" visits and "prophecies" for profits analogous to the myths of Catholicism (resurrections, apparitions, ascensions and immacu-late co-nceptions).

    Current problems:

    Adulterous preachers, pedophiliac clerics, "propheteering/ profiteering" evangelicals and atonement theology,

    June 17, 2011 at 9:01 am |
    • Ed Lauber

      Jesus was not illiterate. He read from the Bible at age 12. Most Jewish males in his time went to school and learned to read. When he explained what he read, religious leaders were amazed. Faith is not something which implies lack of learning.

      June 17, 2011 at 2:28 pm |
    • J

      @Ed Lauber – It is simply amazing that you know more about Jesus' life than your own bible does! Maybe you should write the Gospel of Ed and fill in those mysterious, unknown ~30 years of his life that occured between his birth and his baptism...

      June 17, 2011 at 2:44 pm |
    • rhs98

      @ J – I believe Ed is referencing the end of the second chapter of Luke. Whether or not you agree that the Bible is true, it does contain a reference to Jesus as a twelve year old, and he was indeed amazing the scholars. Luke 4:16-17 has Jesus reading in the local synagouge. Again, agree or disagree with what is written, but don't act like it's not in the Bible.

      June 17, 2011 at 3:43 pm |
    • Reality

      o The illiteracy of the simple preacher man aka Jesus, as per contemporary experts:

      From Professor Bruce Chilton's commentary in his book, Rabbi Jesus, An Intimate Biography,

      "What Luke misses is that Jesus stood in the synagogue as an illiterate m–amzer in his claim to be the Lord's anointed".
      Note: Luke 4: 16 is a single attestation. No where else in the NT does it say Jesus could read thereby making said passage historically unreliable.

      Professor JD Crossan notes that Jesus was illiterate as he came from a landless peasant background, initially a follower of John the Baptist. e.g. The Excavation of Jesus (with Professor Reed), pp 30-31.

      The question of Jesus's literacy has also been much discussed in modern scholarship; the Jesus Seminar and others feel references in the Gospels to Jesus reading and writing may well be fictions.

      The only Gospel reference to Jesus writing is John 8:6 in the Pericope Adulterae, widely considered a later addition, where it is not even clear he is forming letters in the dust, and the Greek "εγραφεν" could equally mean he was drawing
      It is very unfortunate that Jesus was illiterate for it resulted in many gospels and epistles being written years after his death by non-witnesses. This resulted in significant differences in said gospels and epistles and with many embellishments to raise Jesus to the level of a deity to compete with the Roman gods and emperors. See Raymond Brown's book, An Introduction to the New Testament, (Luke 4:16 note on p. 237) for an exhaustive review of the true writers of the gospels and epistles.

      Of course, Muslims believe that Mohammed was also illiterate. This way, they can claim that the only way he could have received the "angelic", koranic passages of death to all infidels and Islamic domination of the globe by any means, was orally since he could not read and write. Google it for verification

      June 17, 2011 at 4:16 pm |
    • rhs98

      Reality, the fact that I graduated is only recorded in one place – my school's records. That doesn't make it untrue. Feel free to speculate, feel free to disbelieve in all or as much of the Bible as you see fit... but please don't make claims that are unsupported. Jesus is recognized even among most unbelievers as having been a historical Jewish rabbi who taught in the first century.. Rabbis were literate. A contemporary, Luke, attests that Jesus could read You have quoted "contemporary experts" who feel that Luke's story of Jesus reading aloud may "well be fictions". Someone thousands of years later saying that something may well be false is harldy a solid truth. It is a speculation, and should be offered as such.

      June 17, 2011 at 4:28 pm |
    • Reality

      NT exegetes like Professors Crossan, Ludemann, Borg and Fredriksen plus a large number of other NT scholars over the past 200 years have reviewed the NT doc-uments, the doc-uments that went into their preparation and all the as-sociated docu-mentation. By comparing the number of attestations and stratums in these books, they were able to separate the "wheat from the chaff". I highly recommend the same ana-lyses for anyone interested in what really happened in Palestine in the first to third century CE.

      Some references to get you started:
      http://www.earlychristianwritings.com/theories.html
      and http://www.earlychristianwritings.com/

      Every Christian has his/her own interpretation of the Word of God. Four different books, at least five auxiliary books/epistles, competing theologians/sects/protests, and competing stories just in the original set followed by translations and embellishments followed by countless interpretations, hidden codes and raptures. IMHO, "god" needs to have another visit to a mountaintop to get the mess cleaned up.

      Of course, there are the other religions that have the same "god" but different authentic Words. Very strange that this "god" could create such confusion don't you think? The whole cacophony smells of politics and greed..

      June 18, 2011 at 12:00 am |
    • rhs98

      @ Reality... I have read these scholars that you mention extensively. Even they will tell you that what they offer is speculation. Don't you find it ironic that you quote their self-admitted speculation with the same authority that Christians quote the Bible?

      June 18, 2011 at 11:11 am |
  14. Bob Creson, President Wycliffe Bible Translators USA

    Wycliffe Bible Translators is committed to eradicating Bible poverty for the nearly 2000 language communities worldwide that do not have one word of Scripture in their own language. Our goal is to have some translation work underway in every one of these communities by the years 2025. My comment in the interview was that we are currently on a pace to see this happen by 2038. Work will be started but not completed. We continue to work toward our mission of seeing this happen sooner rather than later. If you would like to read more about the use of technology in Bible translation visit http://wycliffeusa.wordpress.com/2011/06/16/sooner-and-better/.

    June 17, 2011 at 8:03 am |
    • The Bobinator

      > Wycliffe Bible Translators is committed to eradicating Bible poverty for the nearly 2000 language communities worldwide that do not have one word of Scripture in their own language.

      Wouldn't all that time and effort be better spent by eradicating hunger? You know, reducing the suffering of the people? Something God isn't willing to do?

      June 17, 2011 at 8:06 am |
    • Zelda

      @Bobi, missionaries bring food, education(literacy), medical care and every other good things along with the Bibles. Where there are Christian missionaries, there is life, liberty, hope and strength for everyone. Christian missionaries = true heroes

      June 17, 2011 at 8:14 am |
    • The Bobinator

      @Bobi, missionaries bring food, education(literacy), medical care and every other good things along with the Bibles. Where there are Christian missionaries, there is life, liberty, hope and strength for everyone. Christian missionaries = true heroes

      First of all, they bring medicine and food for the purpose of attracting people to the faith. It's not freely given. Second of all, the bibles cost money. That money could be used to improve infrastructure and feed more people.

      That's why I give my money to secular charities. They don't chuck money away on teaching the populous fairy tales.

      June 17, 2011 at 8:57 am |
    • Zelda

      @Bobi, the physical help means little comparing to meeting the spritual needs. People in need everywhere ask for Bibles from Africa to India to Nazi camps to Communist China to Soviet camps to N. Korea. Your 5 cent charity is nothing. Christians give away everything. Besides, your fellow atheists think the mass massacre of human population is necessary.

      June 17, 2011 at 9:01 am |
    • Zelda

      The Bible alone truly helped humanity in the most hellish conditions on earth everywhere for all time.

      June 17, 2011 at 9:04 am |
    • The Bobinator

      @Bobi, the physical help means little comparing to meeting the spritual needs. People in need everywhere ask for Bibles from Africa to India to Nazi camps to Communist China to Soviet camps to N. Korea. Your 5 cent charity is nothing. Christians give away everything. Besides, your fellow atheists think the mass massacre of human population is necessary.

      Obvious troll is obvious.

      June 17, 2011 at 9:18 am |
    • JohnR

      This is cultural imperialism, plain and simple.

      June 17, 2011 at 9:38 am |
    • David Johnson

      @Zelda

      You said:"missionaries bring food, education(literacy), medical care and every other good things along with the Bibles."

      I once attended an outing put on by a time share outfit. We got lunch. We also had to attend a 4 hour spiel. My lunch wasn't free.

      Cheers!

      June 17, 2011 at 1:11 pm |
    • David Johnson

      I messed up. I vowed to not post to the magic oracle's comments. She just uses so many names.

      Cheers!

      June 17, 2011 at 1:14 pm |
    • W247

      Bob Creson, thank you for the work that you do! I am just starting to go out into the missionary field and understand how much the work that you are doing is appreciated. And before I get spammed by the trolls here, yes we are improving communities (creating village wells, setting up orphanages and seeing to the needs of the widows in remote villages).

      June 17, 2011 at 1:47 pm |
    • The Bobinator

      > Bob Creson, thank you for the work that you do! I am just starting to go out into the missionary field and understand how much the work that you are doing is appreciated. And before I get spammed by the trolls here, yes we are improving communities (creating village wells, setting up orphanages and seeing to the needs of the widows in remote villages).

      And you can't do that without teaching them the bible?

      June 17, 2011 at 2:11 pm |
    • W247

      I would think that people would ask what organization they are from, and I don't think lying to them is a good thing either. It is such a double standard that people have with Christians. People either point fingers at us and tell us we don't do enough, but when we try to do good, we get complaints as well. I am thankful that I have the abilities to go and help out where ever I can through an organization that I believe in. I am sorry that you are not happy with that.

      June 17, 2011 at 2:23 pm |
    • Frogist

      @Zelda: "the physical help means little comparing to meeting the spiritual needs".
      Could you please define what you mean by "spiritual needs"? If you meet a man dying of hunger, do you give him your lunch or a bible? Even if you give him both, that only means both things are equally important. When is giving a starving person a bible more important than giving them a meal?

      June 17, 2011 at 3:19 pm |
    • Frogist

      @Bob Creson: I may not approve of certain aspects of missionary work, but I certainly can see the importance of learning about and preserving these hidden languages. Thanks for the link.

      June 17, 2011 at 3:37 pm |
  15. The Bobinator

    Anyone read the words on Image #4. It's hilarious.

    June 17, 2011 at 7:43 am |
    • frank

      "Da Guy Das Fo Real"–I thought that was a rap artist?

      June 17, 2011 at 5:30 pm |
  16. Zelda

    Printing press, trains, aircrafts, baloons, radio, television, films, phone, fax, internet – everything has been the tool to spread this vital message for humanity, the Bible, into the every corner of the earth. Thank God the Christian missionaries' efforts and their results are really wrapping up though there are still frontiers.

    June 17, 2011 at 7:05 am |
    • Bucky Ball

      The question for me, was why didn't an omniscient omnipotent deity provide the technologies at the time, of the events being touted, if they were THAT important, instead of having to wait for science, somewhat haphazardly, to develop the technologies for transmission, (including an "app" for translation, Mr. Creason) ? The fact that the preacher in question is never reported to have knowledge of, nor ever having said anything about any technology or scientific advance beyond his Bronze Age culture, is somewhat enlightening. My uncle is currently in Columbia doing multiple Cleft Palate Repairs, on children, invited by "missionaries", and for that I am I proud. But I can't help ask, "why not just pray over them " ? Seems even the missionaries find the scientists useful.

      June 17, 2011 at 10:53 am |
    • David Johnson

      @Bucky Ball

      You said: "But I can't help ask, "why not just pray over them " ? Seems even the missionaries find the scientists useful."

      Good point! I have a followup to this:

      Why do Christians spend any money on medical care? They have the promise of god:

      Mark 11:24: Jesus speaking
      Therefore I tell you, whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you have received it, and it will be yours.

      John 14:14: Jesus speaking
      If you ask anything in my name, I will do it.

      Mark 16: Jesus speaking
      16 He who believes and is baptized will be saved; but he who does not believe will be condemned. 17 And these signs will accompany those who believe: in my name they will cast out demons; they will speak in new tongues; 18 they will pick up serpents, and if they drink any deadly thing, it will not hurt them; they will lay their hands on the sick, and they will recover.

      James 5:15:
      And the prayer offered in faith will make the sick person well; the Lord will raise him up.

      Believers babble on about faith and belief and how the bible is the inerrant word of god.
      Yet, most ignore His word, and buy health insurance and seek the knowledge of man.
      They are tweaking the nose of god!

      Some, have actually believed what the bible tells them. They prayed for their child, trusting in the word of god, and withheld medical care. The child died. OOOooopsie!
      Not to fret! This was part of god's plan for the young'in.?

      A true believer would never set foot in a doctor's office!

      But, they do. They seek medical care, because they know these promises of god, are b.s. They know, that in the real world, prayer never works (exception: coincidence / random chance).

      Believers attempt to smooth this over by saying a little prayer, receiving medical treatment and then giving the credit to their god, if they get well... Hmm...

      If you can't believe the bible concerning healing and not worrying about tomorrow, how can you believe it about all the rest? If you can't count on Jesus to keep His promises in this life, why would you believe Him about an afterlife? LOL

      Cheers!

      June 17, 2011 at 1:23 pm |
  17. Zelda

    The Bible is the life-saving Book for everyone everywhere for all time. Every ounce of effort to trasmit it is worth of lifetime.

    June 17, 2011 at 6:55 am |
  18. Zelda

    All the useful technology was invented to complete the evangelizatuion of the world and help the Christian missionraies complete their tasks.

    June 17, 2011 at 6:51 am |
  19. doctore0

    Gawd needs satellite technology and money

    June 17, 2011 at 6:24 am |
  20. not surprised at crazy people anymore

    So instead of doing something worthwhile and helpful, these religious nuts are wasting time and money on providing even more mis-translated copies of a useless book of fairy-tales to anyone they hadn't harassed already and terrorize them into reading some idiot's idea of what the translation should be.
    I'm not surprised.

    June 17, 2011 at 6:20 am |
    • SK

      You are a stupid, ignorant person. The Bible is the most read book and an all time best seller. About 50 Bibles are sold every minute! The Bible easily would blow away any other best seller on the national book list which is the reason it is routinely excluded from these lists. The Bible is also the most translated book. At least one book of the Bible has been translated into 2400 languages! And there are more books written about the Bible than any other book. The Bible has had a tremendous impact on history, western civilization, music, culture, art, literature.. It has changed and impacted lives of millions of people in the last 2000 years.. and you call it useless? How ignorant can you be?

      June 17, 2011 at 7:31 am |
    • Zelda

      The Holy Bible – the only Book in this world worth dying for.

      June 17, 2011 at 8:16 am |
    • The Bobinator

      > You are a stupid, ignorant person. The Bible is the most read book and an all time best seller.

      So what? Doesn't make it true.

      > About 50 Bibles are sold every minute! The Bible easily would blow away any other best seller on the national book list which is the reason it is routinely excluded from these lists. The Bible is also the most translated book. At least one book of the Bible has been translated into 2400 languages!

      Again, so what?

      > And there are more books written about the Bible than any other book. The Bible has had a tremendous impact on history, western civilization, music, culture, art, literature.. It has changed and impacted lives of millions of people in the last 2000 years.. and you call it useless? How ignorant can you be?

      It is not useless. It teaches people to be ignorant of reality, to not ask questions and to value believing in something for no good reason. It's dangerous.

      June 17, 2011 at 9:20 am |
    • JohnR

      @SK The bible may be the most printed book, but readership is a lot lower and comprehension lower still. Foisting these books on everyone worldwide and then gloating about how many are in print is ridiculous.

      June 17, 2011 at 9:40 am |
    • David Johnson

      The Bobinator is correct:

      Statistical research shows that less than 10% of professing Christians have
      ever read the entire Bible. The church as a whole is Biblically illiterate!
      Source: (C) Copyright 2007, Bill Keller Ministries

      Cheers!

      June 17, 2011 at 1:34 pm |
    • The Bobinator

      I think you meant JohnR David. 🙂

      But yes, the reality is that Christians don't know what's in their bible. Ask them how many laws are in the book of laws and watch them scratch their heads. The 10 commandments are just the first 10 people, there's 603 other ones that followed.

      June 17, 2011 at 2:13 pm |
    • W247

      Bobinator: and do you know who the 10 commands where created for, and the reason behind the rest of the mosaic laws in the old testament? I would suggest that you read Galatians to understand how Faith and Truth overcame the need for the laws. And for good measure, how about perusing Romans as well.

      June 17, 2011 at 2:39 pm |
    • J

      @W247 – That was just a literary technique, seen throughout the entire "New Testament", to distance this new Messianic sect away from Orthodox Jews.

      June 17, 2011 at 2:52 pm |
    • W247

      J- I don't think so. There are too many references in the old testament that points forward to the Messiah that were fulfilled by the Christ in the new testament. Even in the old testament there were references to the Jews and the Gentiles, the chosen ones and the church.

      June 17, 2011 at 3:22 pm |
    • Frogist

      @not surprised: It is a fair point to make that things simply do no t translate accurately from one language to another. We have words for things that other languagess do not. And you also have to take into account cultural bias, what the translator thinks a word should mean and what a native knows it means. It doesn't mean that these translations are completely inaccurate. But it does mean some of the subtleties and metaphorical references could be lost. And that would mean even more people interpreting the bible in completely different ways than the missionaries may have wanted them to...

      June 17, 2011 at 3:30 pm |
    • J

      @W247 – I realize we both have strong opinions on this matter and that neither of us will be able to sway the other and that's ok. My response to your post is that you should also realize (and I'm sure you know) that the gospels were written some 20-30 years after the death of Yeshua. Mark being thought of as the most earliest/authentic/original, with each of the other three gospels adding on to the splendor of the story. Prophecy being fulfilled is as easy as inserting it into the story, when you have extensive knowledge of the Torah. Just remember the gospels are NOT actually eyewitness accounts.

      June 17, 2011 at 3:32 pm |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.