home
RSS
June 24th, 2011
02:11 PM ET

Explain it to me: Mormonism

With two Mormons running for the Republican presidential nomination and a play riffing on the religion tearing up Broadway, the country appears to be having a Mormon moment.

Here are 10 facts about Mormonism. What other questions do you have about the faith?

1. The official name of the Mormon church is the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

2. Mormons consider themselves Christian but their beliefs and practices differ from traditional Christianity in key ways, including belief in sacred texts outside the Bible and practices like posthumous proxy baptism and wearing special undergarments.

3. There are about 14 million Mormons today, with more than half living outside the United States.

4.  The Mormon religion was founded in upstate New York in 1830, when Joseph Smith published a translation of writings he said he found and translated from Egyptian-style hieroglyphics into English.  That's the Book of Mormon, which believers say consists of writings produced by ancient American civilizations.

5. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has outlawed polygamy since 1890.

6. Early Mormons faced intense persecution, so church headquarters relocated from New York to Missouri to Illinois in rapid succession. Joseph Smith was killed by a mob in Illinois. His successor, Brigham Young, led early Mormons to the Great Salt Lake in what's now Utah, where church headquarters remains.

7. Mormon men are expected to perform two years of missionary work beginning when they're 19 years old. Women can also do missionary work when they turn 21, but there is less pressure to do so.

8. Famous Mormons include J.W. Marriott, founder of the hotel chain, Glenn Beck and Gladys Knight, a convert.

9. Jon Huntsman and Mitt Romney represent different generations of Mormonism that have related pretty differently to American culture.

10. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is running some major ad campaigns to take advantage of burgeoning interest in the religion.

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Christianity • Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints • Mormonism

soundoff (3,741 Responses)
  1. Amanda

    We moved to Utah three years ago from California. We are not Mormon and live in a town that is prominently Mormon. We have grade school children and most of their friends are Mormon. We have never felt shunned or left out. We have weekend barbeques with our neighbors, hang out with friends and attend birthday parties. We have never felt pressured to join their church. Our religions may believe in exactly the same thing but we respect one another and because of that we have a great community.

    June 26, 2011 at 3:49 pm |
    • The Way It Is

      You should hear what they say about you behind your back.

      June 26, 2011 at 3:54 pm |
    • Jennifer

      To "The Way It Is": your comment is just plain mean and untrue. I'm a Mormon and I have many friends who are not Mormon. We don't talk unkindly about these friends from other faiths behind their backs. Mormons know very well what it means to be mocked, marginalized and talked about unkindly. The last thing we want to do is do that to others. So please give us a little more credit. If you've encountered a Mormon who wasn't a nice person, I'm sorry. Unfortunately, so have I. People are human and they mess up. But just because someone is a Mormon (or Catholic, agnostic, atheist, Baptist, Muslim, etc.) and happens to behave badly, doesn't generalize to everyone in that entire group being a jerk.

      June 26, 2011 at 4:22 pm |
    • The Way It Is

      I see your point, Amanda, but there are quite a few Mormons around here, and the "nice" part is generally as plastic as that Utah smile. I have actually heard a lot of the behind-your-back stuff from them. Sorry, but that's my experience.

      June 26, 2011 at 4:33 pm |
    • Doug

      That is all very lovely, but it doesn't change the fact that only an idiot would believe in Mormonism. It is utter and complete unsubstantiated nonsense! I certainly would not vote for someone I KNEW was an idiot. That is why I did not vote for Bush or Reagan either.

      June 26, 2011 at 6:04 pm |
    • LeaveITAsJustTheWayItIs

      Yet they both (Bush and Reagan) became PUTOS. So that would be GREAT!!!! Please! don't vote either of (Romney and Huntsman) them.

      June 29, 2011 at 7:34 pm |
  2. D'Bourgeois

    Religion and sects evolve dime a dozen every generation. The ones with best salesmanship perseveres.

    Believe in Jesus and YOU will be 'saved', Jesus died to take YOUR sins away – sounds like a commercial? Add to it a community based threat- join us our you are out, or join us our you play more taxes (med Europe) , or join us or we kill you (Americas), and the community will grow. The problem is that the 'meek' have no idea why their ancestors took to Christianity. I'm Ok with religion philosophy, but just take out the God element.

    June 26, 2011 at 3:37 pm |
  3. Reality

    As we "thu-mp" along with rational thinking, conclusions and reiteration to counter the millennia of false and flawed religious history and theology!!!------––

    They are called the Great Angelic Cons:

    Joe Smith had his Moroni.

    Jehovah Witnesses have their Jesus /Michael the archangel, the first angelic being created by God;

    Mohammed had his Gabriel (this "tin-kerbell" got around).

    Jesus and his family had Michael, Gabriel, and Satan, the latter being a modern day dem-on of the de-mented.

    The Abraham-Moses myths had their Angel of Death and other "no-namers" to do their dirty work or other assorted duties.

    Contemporary biblical and religious scholars have relegated these "pretty wingie thingies" to the myth pile. We should do the same to include deleting all references to them in our religious operating manuals. Doing this will eliminate the prophet/profit/prophecy status of these founders and put them where they belong as simple humans just like the rest of us.
    Some added references to "tink-erbells".

    "Latter-day Saints also believe that Michael the Archangel was Adam (the first man) when he was mortal, and Gabriel lived on the earth as Noah."

    Apparently hallu-cinations did not stop with Joe Smith.

    newadvent.org/cathen/07049c.htm

    "The belief in guardian angels can be traced throughout all antiquity; pagans, like Menander and Plutarch (cf. Euseb., "Praep. Evang.", xii), and Neo-Platonists, like Plotinus, held it. It was also the belief of the Babylonians and As-syrians, as their monuments testify, for a figure of a guardian angel now in the British Museum once decorated an As-syrian palace, and might well serve for a modern representation; while Nabopolassar, father of Nebuchadnezzar the Great, says: "He (Marduk) sent a tutelary deity (cherub) of grace to go at my side; in everything that I did, he made my work to succeed."

    Catholic monks and Dark Age theologians also did their share of hallu-cinating:

    "TUBUAS-A member of the group of angels who were removed from the ranks of officially recognized celestial hierarchy in 745 by a council in Rome under Pope Zachary. He was joined by Uriel, Adimus, Sabaoth, Simiel, and Raguel."
    And tin-ker- bells go way, way back:

    "In Zoroastrianism there are different angel like creatures. For example each person has a guardian angel called Fravashi. They patronize human being and other creatures and also manifest god’s energy. Also, the Amesha Spentas have often been regarded as angels, but they don't convey messages, but are rather emanations of Ahura Mazda ("Wise Lord", God); they appear in an abstract fashion in the religious thought of Zarathustra and then later (during the Achaemenid period of Zoroastrianism) became personalized, associated with an aspect of the divine creation (fire, plants, water...)."

    "The beginnings of the biblical belief in angels must be sought in very early folklore. The gods of the Hitti-tes and Canaanites had their supernatural messengers, and parallels to the Old Testament stories of angels are found in Near Eastern literature. "

    "The 'Magic Papyri' contain many spells to secure just such help and protection of angels. From magic traditions arose the concept of the guardian angel. "

    June 26, 2011 at 3:34 pm |
  4. D'Bourgeois

    True religion is science. It can be 'witnessed' by every generation, better still, it only gets more profound.

    The earth was round, and no we weren't special after all, to have entire universe to orbit us. And DNA was the last bit that proved Evolution. Look at it another way – that is how God intended. To say otherwise is to hurl Bible at God in disrespect.

    June 26, 2011 at 3:30 pm |
  5. grace

    We abelieve in God, the Eternal Father, and in His Son, Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Ghost.

    2We believe that men will be punished for their own sins, and not for Adam’s transgression.

    3We believe that through the Atonement of Christ, all mankind may be saved, by obedience to the laws and ordinances of the Gospel.

    4We believe that the first principles and ordinances of the Gospel are: first, Faith in the Lord Jesus Christ; second, Repentance; third, Baptism by eimmersion for the remission of sins; fourth, Laying on of hands for the gift of the Holy Ghost.

    5We believe that a man must be called of God, by prophecy, and by the laying on of hands by those who are in authority, to preach the Gospel and administer in the fordinances thereof.

    6We believe in the same organization that existed in the Primitive Church, namely, apostles, prophets, pastors, teachers, evangelists, and so forth.

    7We believe in the agift of btongues, cprophecy, drevelation, evisions, fhealing, ginterpretation of tongues, and so forth.

    8We believe the Bible to be the word of God as far as it is translated correctly; we also believe the Book of Mormon to be the word of God.

    9We believe all that God has revealed, all that He does now reveal, and we believe that He will yet reveal many great and important things pertaining to the Kingdom of God.

    10We believe in the literal agathering of Israel and in the restoration of the bTen Tribes; that cZion (the New Jerusalem) will be built upon the American continent; that Christ will dreign personally upon the earth; and, that the earth will be erenewed and receive its fparadisiacal gglory.

    11We claim the aprivilege of worshiping Almighty God according to the bdictates of our own cconscience, and allow all men the same privilege, let them dworship how, where, or what they may.

    12We believe in being asubject to bkings, presidents, rulers, and magistrates, in cobeying, honoring, and sustaining the dlaw.

    13aWe believe in being honest, true, chaste, benevolent, virtuous, and in doing egood to all men; indeed, we may say that we follow the admonition of Paul—We believe all things, we fhope all things, we have endured many things, and hope to be able to endure all things. If there is anything virtuous, lovely, or of good report or praiseworthy, we seek after these things.

    Joseph Smith.

    June 26, 2011 at 3:25 pm |
  6. grace

    We abelieve in bGod, the Eternal Father, and in His cSon, Jesus Christ, and in the dHoly Ghost.

    2We believe that men will be apunished for their bown sins, and not for Adam’s ctransgression.

    3We believe that through the aAtonement of Christ, all bmankind may be csaved, by obedience to the laws and ordinances of the Gospel.

    4We believe that the first principles and aordinances of the Gospel are: first, bFaith in the Lord Jesus Christ; second, cRepentance; third, dBaptism by eimmersion for the fremission of sins; fourth, Laying on of ghands for the hgift of the Holy Ghost.

    5We believe that a man must be acalled of God, by bprophecy, and by the laying on of chands by those who are in dauthority, to epreach the Gospel and administer in the fordinances thereof.

    6We believe in the same aorganization that existed in the Primitive Church, namely, apostles, bprophets, cpastors, dteachers, eevangelists, and so forth.

    7We believe in the agift of btongues, cprophecy, drevelation, evisions, fhealing, ginterpretation of tongues, and so forth.

    8We believe the aBible to be the bword of God as far as it is translated ccorrectly; we also believe the dBook of Mormon to be the word of God.

    9We believe all that God has arevealed, all that He does now reveal, and we believe that He will yet breveal many great and important things pertaining to the Kingdom of God.

    10We believe in the literal agathering of Israel and in the restoration of the bTen Tribes; that cZion (the New Jerusalem) will be built upon the American continent; that Christ will dreign personally upon the earth; and, that the earth will be erenewed and receive its fparadisiacal gglory.

    11We claim the aprivilege of worshiping Almighty God according to the bdictates of our own cconscience, and allow all men the same privilege, let them dworship how, where, or what they may.

    12We believe in being asubject to bkings, presidents, rulers, and magistrates, in cobeying, honoring, and sustaining the dlaw.

    13aWe believe in being bhonest, true, cchaste, dbenevolent, virtuous, and in doing egood to all men; indeed, we may say that we follow the admonition of Paul—We believe all things, we fhope all things, we have endured many things, and hope to be able to gendure all things. If there is anything hvirtuous, ilovely, or of good report or praiseworthy, we seek after these things.

    Joseph Smith.

    June 26, 2011 at 3:18 pm |
    • Joseph Smith Loses a Debate With A Chicken

      That's the same Joseph Smith who ran a bank pyramid scam in Kirtland which bankrupted many Mormons?

      The same Joseph Smith who "translated" some Egyptian funerary docu-ments as the Book of Abraham?

      The same Joseph Smith whose wild prophecies have been spectacularly wrong (New York and Boston will be destroyed if they reject the gospel. The "hour of their judgement is nigh")?

      June 26, 2011 at 3:36 pm |
    • DivideByZero

      Joseph Smith also said that there are men living on the moon who dress like Quakers and live to be nearly 1000 years old.

      June 26, 2011 at 3:46 pm |
    • Joseph Smith Loses a Debate With A Chicken

      Wow! He really DID say that there were men on the moon! I thought you were making that up.

      June 26, 2011 at 3:52 pm |
    • Segev Stormlord

      Joseph Smith, like all prophets, was a fallible man. It is very, very important to distinguish between what he said in speculation and/or as a personal thought and what he proclaimed as God's teaching and doctrine. You will find that "there are men on the moon" is the former, not the latter.

      As for "running a pyramid scheme," it's amazing how such a master criminal never managed to become supremely wealthy. Joseph Smith was actually a failure in most business ventures he ever entered into, barely earning enough to keep his family alive and afloat. He was not a skilled con man or a brilliant business schemer; the times when his leadership was brilliant are almost all directly correlated to the times he was acting as President of the Church and a Prophet of God.

      So, if this was all an elaborate con to gain power and wealth, he did a SUPREMELY lousy job of it, in terms of actually achieving the goals ascribed to him by his detractors.

      July 7, 2011 at 11:27 am |
  7. Brian

    While many comments shared here will try to demonize and criticize the Church of Jesus Christ, millions of children of God all across the world will be inspired to exercise faith in the Savior Jesus Christ and repent because of what they felt and learned at LDS chapels around the world today.

    Jesus Christ invites all men everywhere to come unto Him. He does so through His living church.

    It's not a new religion or a new way. The way is Jesus Christ just as it was revealed unto Adam, later Moses, later Isaiah, and even as Jesus himself revealed it. Joseph Smith was yet another man chosen by God to reveal again to a world in darkness the light and life of Jesus Christ.

    All who truly seek Jesus Christ will come to know Him and His love for them more fully in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. The only way to prove it is to search a Mormon meeting house and attend next sunday.

    June 26, 2011 at 3:06 pm |
    • D'Bourgeois

      All were mortal spiritual leaders, that were made to look like God by extreme elements of later generation. How come people believe in a grand wiki-text like Bible, an not in contemporary media?

      June 26, 2011 at 3:23 pm |
  8. Yeahyeah

    If you ever start your own religion, make sure you make big families one of the tenets; that way you are sure to succeed eventually......

    June 26, 2011 at 2:34 pm |
    • Mark from Middle River

      Yep, and Athiest do not raise their kids to embrace their views on Faith ... 😀

      June 26, 2011 at 2:39 pm |
    • Not So

      Actually, I have not indoctrinated my children at all about religion. None of them would be know what to say if they were asked what religion I and my wife are. They get to choose themselves.

      Obviously, I am not a Christian.

      June 26, 2011 at 2:54 pm |
    • lilgtogirl

      Like those weird people on the TV show with 20 kids all with J names! I always wonder if future Americans will wonder why we did not take them out while their numbers were still small.

      June 26, 2011 at 3:11 pm |
    • jorgath

      Actually, Mark, I was raised an atheist. I've been, at times, an agnostic, a pagan, a pantheist, a panentheist, a Unitarian, and now I consider myself Deist. But I don't think I've been an actual atheist since I was seven, although my upbringing never changed.

      June 27, 2011 at 1:33 am |
  9. Mark from Middle River

    >> "I can't stomach organized religions."

    Hey Sybaris

    Check out the second video, 3 minute 50 seconds.

    http://www.icna.org/icna-on-the-daily-show-with-john-stewart/

    I forgot all about this Jon Stewart Episode. 😀

    June 26, 2011 at 2:21 pm |
  10. elder price

    "a mormon just believes"... is my favorite quote from "the book of mormon" play.

    such a genius way in explaining why and how people really could believe any kind of religious stories. from first hand "mormon experience", motivations for "believing" are more driven from social pressures and fear. Ironically, its very pride-driven motivation to be a "strong believer". Someone who is a devout member will comment favorably on other members who so eloquently "bear their testimonies"(state their beliefs in public meetings), and the more emotional responses you illicit with your conviction, will increase the strength of your testimony.

    June 26, 2011 at 2:21 pm |
    • emanym

      I agree, Elder Price! That is a great song – and based on truth! I think my favorite song is "Turn it Off"... it truly is a nifty little mormon trick!

      June 26, 2011 at 9:17 pm |
    • Segev Stormlord

      Kindly do not confuse a parody with truth. While I am told there are many things that have grains of truth, and the LDS official response is one of a polite shrug that it is parody and free to be so, I caution you not to think that everything in it is accurate. From what I've read of reviews, this particular play has numerous very non-mormon ideas in it. "Turn it off" is PARTICULARLY against how we actually believe and how, in my experience, missionaries act and are taught to act.

      I never went on a mission, myself, but I suspect that the missionary leader in that play would have been withdrawn post-haste were his leadership tips known to his superiors, were this anything but a parody.

      July 7, 2011 at 11:31 am |
  11. Russ

    A Church is not Christian unless it subscribes to at least one of the Christian Creeds. Mormans do not which makes them a cult.

    June 26, 2011 at 2:16 pm |
    • Mark from Middle River

      Gee Russ, I guess they are glad you are mighty enough to define another let alone an entire group.

      June 26, 2011 at 2:22 pm |
    • Brian

      I guess Paul, Peter, and everyone else in the Bible aren't Christians, because the creeds didn't exist until a few hundred years after they died.

      June 26, 2011 at 7:03 pm |
  12. Cathie

    I am a Mormon and proud of my heritage having been born in a family who many have inherited talents and knowledge and learning of the great sacrifices made by our Mormon ancestry before us. It is through these values and lessons taught by them that have instilled in us the ability to see beyond the frailties of life and humble living to look beyond to our neighbors who may or may not be of our faith and look and see how we can care for others when in need. At present I am a single woman who takes care of my near-100 year old mother – who is doing amazingly well for her age and mobility. I do not get to Church as much – but feel that it is through a healthy lifestyle and close relationship to caring individuals many not of our faith and some remarkable Mormons who are there for support. I hope that many other people will ponder and listen to their heart when they are searching out and seeking for an understanding of life will be guided in the right direction and learn from what examples are taught from all walks of life and find out for themselves what is the purpose in life for themselves.

    June 26, 2011 at 2:15 pm |
  13. Doug

    The article leaves out all the REALLY goofy stuff for some reason. Is the author a Mormon perhaps? What about the part where Mormon's are resurrected when they die like Jesus and become a God over their own planet? What about the part where God (there God) came down from his planet in human form and "laid down" with Mary PHYSICALLY to give Jesus, the first soul in the world, human life. They are definitely not Christians by any standard definition. I could go on and on. Mormons are off the chart weird. For the record I am an Agnostic and don't really care, but I can't overlook the omissions of which there are MANY more and didn’t mention.

    June 26, 2011 at 2:04 pm |
    • bhigh

      As if the sacred underwear, proxy baptism, and hieroglyphs by ancient Americans aren't goofy enough?

      June 26, 2011 at 2:46 pm |
    • Brian

      Mormons believe Mary was a virgin. Done.

      They also believe the Bible when it says we can become perfect even as our Father in Heaven is perfect. And most Christians believe in the resurrection of man. In Adam all die, so in Christ shall all be made alive.

      June 26, 2011 at 7:05 pm |
  14. CSM

    A cult is a cult is a cult... nothing more.

    June 26, 2011 at 12:55 pm |
    • Jb

      Ignorance is ignorance is ignorance ... nothing more.

      June 26, 2011 at 1:12 pm |
    • DivideByZero

      Which is exactly the point. The Mormon cult is ignorant.

      June 26, 2011 at 2:55 pm |
  15. Michael

    Nice reliable people caught up in a goofy religion. Its more about who they are. They dont actually understand all that mythology either.

    June 26, 2011 at 12:25 pm |
    • Mark from Middle River

      Chances are they are nice because of their Faith... that Love they nieghbors thing.

      June 26, 2011 at 2:01 pm |
    • Dave

      lol @ mark from middle earth. because of their faith? must have been jerks before they had it I guess. God Bless the Mormons!!!

      June 26, 2011 at 3:13 pm |
  16. UtahSkiGirl

    We moved to Utah six years ago from the Midwest. We're not Mormon and live in a town that has fewer Mormons, but I work in Salt Lake City. As a rule, everyone has been very kind and welcoming. However, as a married person over 30 years, I can tell people here find it odd that we don't have children. There are some unintelligent people whom we hardly know who happen to be Mormon and ask whether or not we plan to have children. There are unintelligent people everywhere who aren't Mormon too. There are also stupid people who are Mormon who want to shelter their children from other belief systems and won't let them play with other children. I've seen that happen here. Reality is people need to learn to get along with other people with different beliefs. Sheltering your kids from other belief systems isn't going to make them very well adjusted or worldly. Adults who don't socialize with people of other religions or beliefs are just trying to justify their hatred through ignorance.

    June 26, 2011 at 11:41 am |
  17. DenverVet

    This overview of the Mormon Church left out a lot of their beliefs, most of the weird stuff was left out like the "Salamander Letter"........lol. This is truly a cult. Joseph Smith lost those gold plates on the way home..........how convenient. I just can't see how people can believe in all this crazy stuff!

    June 26, 2011 at 11:18 am |
    • Seth

      Check your facts, please. The "Salamander Letters" were an anti-Mormon hoax, and Smith did not "lose" the plates. Always good to dig a little deeper before you challenge another's faith. Otherwise, you just look silly.

      June 26, 2011 at 1:43 pm |
    • JMS

      Lol! What an idiot. Seriously, you didn't know the Salamander Letter was a forgery of Mark Hoffman, who's in prison??? It just goes to show how uneducated the Mormon bigots are.

      June 26, 2011 at 2:10 pm |
    • I_get_it

      A fabrication about a fabrication - ROFL!

      June 26, 2011 at 2:49 pm |
    • DivideByZero

      He didn't "lose" the plates (which of course nobody ever saw except with their "spiritual eyes")
      ... they just simply disappeared because God didn't want to leave any proof of it's existence.

      June 26, 2011 at 2:59 pm |
    • Brian

      The whole "spiritual eyes" comes from a third party source where some former Mormon remembers once hearing Martin Harris say that, but in fact Harris denied the claim in no uncertain terms. Time for anti-Mormons to put that one to rest. But they tend to cling to one dubious story, ignoring the vast historical evidence that refutes it.

      June 26, 2011 at 7:09 pm |
    • DivideByZero

      Third party?
      Martin Harris was unstable at best. He joined at least 5 other religions AFTER the Mormons were established.
      Spiritual eyes, real eyes, whatever; the point was nobody ever saw any golden plates. Or did you miss the story of how the BOM was really translated by sticking his head in a hat with 2 rocks. Oh yeah, that's right... that's not how they teach it in Sunday School nowadays.

      “Joseph Smith would put the seer stone into a hat, and put his face in the hat, drawing it closely around his face to exclude the light;" (David Whitmer, An Address to All Believers in Christ, Richmond, Mo.: n.p., 1887, p. 12.)

      June 26, 2011 at 10:23 pm |
  18. Agha Ata (USA)

    Mormons have forced their way into the world of religions to divide it further. It is laughable to see, if they are proud of having done so?

    June 26, 2011 at 10:21 am |
  19. kpopper

    The key difference between the Mormon church and the Christian church is that the invention of a new religion by Joseph Smith is sufficiently recent that we can see the tricks he used to deceive his gullible followers, whereas the invention of Christianity is too far away to be clearly seen.

    June 26, 2011 at 9:31 am |
    • Tom

      yes!! almost all religious cults divide not unify people which leads to more mistrust , ignorance and hatred. I can't stomach organized religions.

      June 26, 2011 at 11:14 am |
    • Mark from Middle River

      And then we have interfaith meetings and joint services ... Then you see that organized Religions do and can work very well.

      June 26, 2011 at 2:05 pm |
  20. Sybaris

    Funny to see all the "real christians" posting their bible quotes and dersion about the mormon church. They shouldn't wonder why Atheists and other faiths look at them with as much contempt.

    June 26, 2011 at 9:24 am |
    • Mark from Middle River

      What is a "Real Christian"? I heard someone say that because I am a Republican I am no longer considered a "real" black guy? Is this the same?

      Is there something that qualifies folks such as yourself to define who are "real" members of specific groups?

      June 26, 2011 at 1:57 pm |
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
Advertisement
About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.