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Child's grisly murder shocks Jewish Brooklyn neighborhood
The scene on Wednesday in front of the residence where Leiby Kletzky lived.
July 14th, 2011
04:53 PM ET

Child's grisly murder shocks Jewish Brooklyn neighborhood

By Dan Gilgoff and Eric Marrapodi, CNN

Brooklyn, New York (CNN) – An 8-year-old's grisly murder would shock any community, but there's an added layer of astonishment in this neighborhood because the alleged killer appears to hail from the same close-knit religious community as the victim.

On Thursday, New York police charged a 35-year-old man with the killing of Leiby Kletzky, an Orthodox Jewish boy, after officers found human remains in the man's refrigerator and a trash bin.

The alleged killer also appears to be an Orthodox Jew who lived relatively nearby to Kletzky, according to community members.

"You can't possibly describe how tragic this is and how upset people are this boy was murdered by a person living in the community, who shares his religion and his neighborhood," said Ezra Friedlander, who lives in Borough Park, the neighborhood where Kletzky went missing on Monday.

On Thursday, Levi Aron was arraigned on first degree murder and kidnapping charges in Brooklyn in connection with Kletzky's death.

"It would have been extremely scary if a terrorist would have come into the community and killed a boy, but when it's one of your own you feel even more vulnerable," said Friedlander, a public relations executive who represents many Orthodox Jewish clients.

"The level of fear that mothers and fathers and children here are experiencing is something that I never witnessed before," he said.

Police say the 35-year-old Levi Aron made statements Wednesday implicating himself in the death of Leiby Kletzky.

Kletzky was supposed to meet his parents after walking seven blocks from his summer day camp, but became lost and asked the suspect for directions, New York Police Commissioner Ray Kelly said.

Menachem Freed, a 37-year-old Orthodox Jew whose 9-year-old son was Kletzky's classmate, said the community prides itself on its faith-based unity.

Borough Park is composed mostly of Hasidic Jews and non-Hasidic ultra-Orthodox Jews of Eastern European descent. Signs for everything from pediatricians' offices to a pizza parlor are in both Hebrew and English.

Families with young children are everywhere, with streams of women pushing strollers down sidewalks and bearded Hasidic men piloting minivans through narrow streets.

"We all believe in the same ideas," Freed said, standing outside his son's preschool, where he showed up Thursday to help children deal with the murder.

On Monday night, Freed and his family had joined with other Orthodox Jews from the neighborhood to search for Kletzky.

The neighborhood's Jewish security patrol force - called the shomrim - searched for the boy through the night.

Working from surveillance video that showed Aron entering a dentist's office Monday while Kletzky waited for him across the street for seven minutes, police arrived at Aron's residence at 2:40 a.m. Wednesday to ask about the boy's whereabouts.

The suspect pointed them to the kitchen, where blood was visible on the freezer handle. Inside the refrigerator was a cutting board with three blood-spattered carving knives, Kelly said.

"A lot of people were saying that they would think differently about what they would allow their children to do," said Josh Nathan-Kazis, a staff writer for the Jewish newspaper The Forward, who is covering neighborhood reaction to Kletzky's murder.

"When you're there, it feels like a small town: Everybody knows each other," said Nathan-Kazis, describing Borough Park. "The fact that the alleged perpetrator was more or less from the same community, it's like they don't know who to trust."

There are questions about how active Aron was in the Jewish community, but pictures of him that have surfaced show him in traditional Orthodox Jewish dress.

New York State Assemblyman Dov Hikind said the largely insular Orthodox neighborhood bred a sense of trust among adults and children.

"Borough Park is a largely Hasidic, Orthodox neighborhood - most people have beards and side curls," he said. "Often kids will trust someone who looks like their father or looks like their friend or like their teachers and say, 'Oh, this guy must be safe."

"This is not the case, never should have been the case," he continued. "You've got to be very, very careful. You've got to teach your kids. You've got to talk to your kids."

A young father who was pushing two strollers with children in Borough Park on Thursday said his rabbis told him to explain to his children that such a murder only happens "once in 10 years or even once in a lifetime."

Like many Orthodox Jews interviewed here, the man declined to give his name.

Nathan-Kazis said that rumors had begun emerging in Borough Park's Orthodox community that portrayed Aron as something of an outsider.

One such rumor suggested that Aron is a Sephardic Jew - meaning of Spanish of North African descent - unlike most Borough Park Jews, who are Ashkenazi, or of Eastern European descent.

"You could see the community struggling with the fact that the suspect is Jewish and lived nearby and at the same time protect a sense of safety in the community," Nathan-Kazis said.

Thousands of Orthodox Jews turned out for Kletzky's funeral on Wednesday.

On Thursday, community members organized an effort to initiate a Torah scroll in Kletzky's name.

"It's an extremely lofty way to elevate someone's memory," Friedlander said of the scroll. "Not every person has a Torah in their name."

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Judaism • New York • Uncategorized

soundoff (1,564 Responses)
  1. SW

    Every community has its share of dysfunctional people, and in some cases, potentially dangerous individuals, yet the community cannot or is not willing to take any action. There is a man who has harassed and frightened my daughter and another child, yet the response from my community has been that while we know he has issues and is emotionally unstable, he has not broken the law, and therefore we cannot prevent him from worshipping in his place of choice. In the end, it is your responsibility to be very clear you children about who they can trust, and who they need to stay away from, and that they cannot get into a car with just anyone. It's unfortunate, but a person can no longer be considered safe just because they are a member of your faith community.

    July 15, 2011 at 8:03 am |
  2. Muneef

    It is not about happening to a Jew from a Jew ....it is rather a human to human whether they were Jew or Christian or Muslims or Hindus or Atheists or pangan or any Other belief or disbeleif....!

    It is about how filth be cleaned from streets and from the souls and mentalities of all humans...the way the subject is being driven to is that they rather mean he can get away with it put to mental hospital,serve little time and end of the story?
    That's it just like all the crimes that passes by where the criminal can go out and find another victim like so many stories we heard of whether to a child or an adult "Kidnap is Kidnap,Abuse is Abuse and Murder is Murder...!

    No wonder why the crime is on the increase and every body turns our to be sick or under drug power or momental anger And many more holes in the justice system, that lawyers are good with freeing a criminal of back into the streets as long as they arevpaid well why should they care whether really was innocent or guilty..!

    Well it is your life and money people spending it in prolonging court trials and for jails as big as cities to host and feed all those good or boas or evil? Who became as teachers in jails for new short sentenced prisoners to go out more developed and stronger to commit more crimes...

    Tell you what the day you decide to clean the streets and the prison jails then the Sharia of Torah,Gospel and Quran has to be applied... You can separate the religion from the state but no advisable for it to be separate from the Justice System....!

    July 15, 2011 at 8:02 am |
    • Julia

      Your point of our extremely flawed justice system is absolutely correct. However, I must say you detoured incorrectly by saying: "You can separate the religion from the state but no advisable for it to be separate from the Justice System....!" The justice system should at least be guided by morality and a basic knowledge of right and wrong. No religion needs to be inserted.

      July 15, 2011 at 9:37 am |
  3. Arik

    A Committee of the Israeli Knesset (Parliament) passed a first draft of a law that will require that Palestinians whose homes are destroyed by Israeli forces pay the Israeli government for the demolition costs.

    The law will now be passed to the full Knesset for a final reading, where it is expected to pass due to the current makeup of the Knesset.

    July 15, 2011 at 7:56 am |
    • saywhat

      MAN, WHAT THE HECK ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT OR DID I MISS SOMETHING?

      July 15, 2011 at 8:07 am |
    • Julia

      I have to agree that what you just reported is wrong and should not happen but this has ZERO to do with an article about the death of an innocent 8 yr old boy. Your posting this topic here is not appropriate.

      July 15, 2011 at 9:18 am |
  4. michael

    Think if the rivers of blood spilt by all those army generals so that in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a pale blue dot
    Think of the endless cruelties envisaged by one group of inhabitants of this planet, on another group of inhabitants, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatred , how frequent their misunderstandings.
    Our posturings, our imagined self importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the universe are challenged by this point of pale light.

    July 15, 2011 at 7:47 am |
    • Julia

      What ARE you babbling about? What does ANY of that have to do with the murder and mutilation of an 8 yr old boy? Granted, man has waged brutal senseless wars against one another since the beginning of time and all of that is truly horrible, BUT war is not the same thing as murdering, then mutilating an 8 yr old boy and sticking his body parts in his freezer.

      July 15, 2011 at 9:12 am |
  5. silkgeisha

    I have been reading and watching this news coverage, I don't know how this story is turning into a race/religion story. The fact is that a sicko killed an innocent little boy, period. Not just killing the boy but dismembered his body.. that's sick!

    July 15, 2011 at 7:46 am |
    • saywhat

      THANK YOU!!!!

      July 15, 2011 at 8:09 am |
  6. musings

    I see you are talking about "Mudbloods" who aren't fully "in". Kind of how Lucius Malfoy would describe Hermione.

    July 15, 2011 at 7:43 am |
  7. michael

    funny how many on here are pretending this doesn't happen in judasim

    July 15, 2011 at 7:37 am |
  8. Nice Jewish Girl

    Remember this – "Many have quarreled about religion that never practiced it." Ben Franklin. The Hasidic and Orthodox community is very insular. I am neither but grew up in a neighborhood that saw going from Conservative and Reformed to what is now Hasidic and Orthodox. The people are interested in really only 2 things, family and religion. It is very difficult to "break" into the commuity. They are very private and practice their religion deeply. The people are caring and will help you if you need help, but unless you respect their way you will never understand them. To this day I still have friends who are deeply religious (Hasidic and Orthodox). My grandmothers were both Orthodox so I know the community. I am not and that is my wish but I respect those that do practice. I feel for the family and understand their new found fear of others of the same religious height. It will take time but they will return to normal.

    July 15, 2011 at 7:34 am |
    • shalom

      Well spoken and like you I moved from the Orthodox community to the Conservative community. But under the eyes of G_D we are all "Jews"

      July 15, 2011 at 8:02 am |
    • HW

      I moved into a diversivied Neighborhood in the town of TEANECK, NJ. Within seven years it turned into what is politely called, "modern orthodox." These people would not speak to me, did not allow my children to play with their children. They did nothing to me, but did manage to insulate me. My background is secular Jew. Nevertheless, I could no longer stand it. I put my house for sale, and all of a sudden the neighbors started talking to me about the sale. I refused to sell it to them and sold it to a non Jewish family.

      July 15, 2011 at 8:03 am |
    • HW

      The Hassidic are caring? What gave you that idea. I have personal experience with Hassidic Orthodox. They are vile. They hate blacks, hispanics, and anyone who does not belong to their circle. Sure, they will work with you, be poilite, but the reality is that they hate everyone else.
      I also have experience with another insular sect, the PA Amish, who I found truly to be extremely tolerant and showed not signs of intolerance, hate or anything against any race, religion or people.

      July 15, 2011 at 8:10 am |
  9. Brotherman

    My heart goes out to the whole community involved but especially the family who lost their son. This is so sad. I pray the LORD will carry you all through this tragedy.

    July 15, 2011 at 7:31 am |
  10. Rainer Braendlein

    Passage from the above article:

    A young father who was pushing two strollers with children in Borough Park on Thursday said his rabbis told him to explain to his children that such a murder only happens "once in 10 years or even once in a lifetime."

    End of passage.

    I guess, the above statement of the rabbis is right. Such crimes don't occur very often. The probability to die by an accident or any disease is surley much higher.

    And of course such a murder can occur in every community, not solely in the Jewish one.

    Some of you may have ever heard of Fritz Haarman (1879-1925). He has murdered 24 boys. How did he kill them? He bit through the throat of the boys by his own teeth!!! This occured in the German town Hannover.

    Regarding the whole Germany (consider, this is a whole country and not only a district) children are murdered perpetually. However, the probability for a single child to become victim of a murder is nearly zero.

    July 15, 2011 at 7:31 am |
    • musings

      Even if it is rare for an individual child, statistically, to be murdered, children still need to be taught not to go with strangers. They also need to understand the definition of stranger. If you have told a child that people in his community are safe, while people outside it, some new learning will be necessary in light of this killing.

      I think that is the source of the alarm in this community. But as we know, molestation (short of murder) occurs (when it does) with trusted adults to whom children have been entrusted. That's perhaps a different story, with different instructions for kids.

      July 15, 2011 at 7:38 am |
  11. shalom

    To the Kletzky family:

    "Ha-Makom yinakhem otkha b'tokh sh'ahr avalei Tzion v'Yerushalayim."

    "May the Almighty comfert you among the mourners of Zion and Jerusalem"

    July 15, 2011 at 7:26 am |
  12. Reality

    Obviously, followers of Judaism are not god's chosen people putting them with the rest of us wayward people!!!

    July 15, 2011 at 7:25 am |
    • Patti

      God allows things for reasons we do not know. The Jewish people have and always be Gods people.

      July 15, 2011 at 8:03 am |
    • Reality

      New Torah For Modern Minds

      origin: http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=F20E1EFE35540C7A8CDDAA0894DA404482

      "New Torah For Modern Minds

      Abraham, the Jewish patriarch, probably never existed. Nor did Moses. The entire Exodus story as recounted in the Bible probably never occurred. The same is true of the tumbling of the walls of Jericho. And David, far from being the fearless king who built Jerusalem into a mighty capital, was more likely a provincial leader whose reputation was later magnified to provide a rallying point for a fledgling nation.

      Such startling propositions - the product of findings by archaeologists digging in Israel and its environs over the last 25 years - have gained wide acceptance among non-Orthodox rabbis. But there has been no attempt to disseminate these ideas or to discuss them with the laity - until now.

      The United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism, which represents the 1.5 million Conservative Jews in the United States, has just issued a new Torah and commentary, the first for Conservatives in more than 60 years. Called "Etz Hayim" ("Tree of Life" in Hebrew), it offers an interpretation that incorporates the latest findings from archaeology, philology, anthropology and the study of ancient cultures. To the editors who worked on the book, it represents one of the boldest efforts ever to introduce into the religious mainstream a view of the Bible as a human rather than divine doc-ument.

      The notion that the Bible is not literally true "is more or less settled and understood among most Conservative rabbis," observed David Wolpe, a rabbi at Sinai Temple in Los Angeles and a contributor to "Etz Hayim." But some congregants, he said, "may not like the stark airing of it." Last Passover, in a sermon to 2,200 congregants at his synagogue, Rabbi Wolpe frankly said that "virtually every modern archaeologist" agrees "that the way the Bible describes the Exodus is not the way that it happened, if it happened at all." The rabbi offered what he called a "LITANY OF DISILLUSION”' about the narrative, including contradictions, improbabilities, chronological lapses and the absence of corroborating evidence. In fact, he said, archaeologists digging in the Sinai have "found no trace of the tribes of Israel - not one shard of pottery."

      July 15, 2011 at 4:49 pm |
  13. terry

    a known fact is that serial killers rarely kill outside of their culture/nationality/religious group...

    July 15, 2011 at 7:21 am |
  14. Shawn

    Hey folks, lets show some respect to one another, no need to bash one another or any particular faith. The 8 year old was a human being. The guy who killed him was a human being. Are some people more prone to violence....sure. It goes with any race.. Everyone is pointing the finger or bringing about some factoid of information to draw a correlation and assign blame. I'm no doctor, lawyer, psychiatrist, anthropologist....whatever, just an average person who is somewhat educated. Has anyone stopped to think that maybe the guy is just sick...mentally? Of course this doesn't make it right, but right now all I read is stuff about race, religious faith, and so on. The guy's a human being who has a problem. Maybe he is an evil person who is just sick, either way, he's obviously got problems. He's caught now, most likely he'll spend along time in a prison and have time to think about what he has done to a community, and embarrassed his faith. Just because he is Jewish doesn't mean he is any less prone or capable of getting sick or suffer from some form of dementia. Is this a rare occurrence as I am reading...sure. But it can and does happen....don't place one faith/religion on a pedestal...no one is perferct. An 8 year child has died....show some respect.

    July 15, 2011 at 7:17 am |
    • shalom

      very well said...

      July 15, 2011 at 7:27 am |
    • loriey

      My heart goes out in deep sadness to the family of this young boy whose life was tragically ended by Mr Aron. We try to help our children reach autonomy, but there are dangers everywhere. The most over protected child can still fall into the hands of someone like this. at any time.
      Yes, Mr Aron will receive treatment/punishment that will not bring back to his parents this young boy. Sad to say the parents will be comforted by family & friends but will always have a broken empty heart where Lieiby should be.

      July 15, 2011 at 7:32 am |
    • Muneef

      So you mean he can get away with it put to mental hospital and end of the story? That's it just like all the crimes that passes by where the criminal can go out and find another victim like so many stories we heard about?

      No wonder why the crime is on the increase and every body turns our to be sick or under drug power or momental anger And many more holes in the justice system...!

      Well it is your life and money people spending it in prolonging court trials and for jails as big as cities to host and feed all those good or boas or evil? Who became as teachers in jails for new short sentenced prisoners to go out more developed and stronger to commit more...!

      Tell you what the day you decide to clean the streets and the prison jails then the Sharia of Torah,Gospel and Quran has to be applied... You can separate the religion from the state but no advisable for it to be separate from the Justice System....

      July 15, 2011 at 7:45 am |
  15. Colin

    Judaism is the belief that an infinitely-old, all-knowing being, powerful enough to create the entire Universe and its billions of galaxies, has a personal interest in the amount of skin on my peni$.

    Atheism is the belief that the above belief is ludicrous.

    July 15, 2011 at 6:36 am |
    • IzzisGirl

      You obviously have no clue about Judaism or our beliefs.

      July 15, 2011 at 6:49 am |
    • Muneef

      Who would have a clue of both with so many books surrounding both a man can spend a life time diving in their contents trying to figure out their indifference's each telling some thing else...!! Maybe Colin should wait until he is retired to delicate him self to observe all...,

      July 15, 2011 at 7:12 am |
    • LRoy

      We sure don't have Jews like that where I live...most are reform, I'm sure some are converts from Christianity.
      What strikes me most is the perambulator (baby carriage). If I ever get to the point where I can no longer want, I want an adult size for myself.

      July 15, 2011 at 7:27 am |
  16. Eli

    When a crime like this happens in an orthodox neighborhood from the hands of an Orthodox man you know it's the end of the world, they are the last people on earth to do such a crime. As a Jew myself, half Ashkenazim and half Mizrachi I agree that the Sephardi and Mizrachi tend to be more violent than the European Ashkenazim. In Israel among the secular Jews, Mizrachi/Sepharadi have a much greater crime rate than secular Ashkenazim Jews. There is some truth to the rumor. Jews who mixed with Black and Arab are more violent, no doubt but anything is possible.

    July 15, 2011 at 6:18 am |
    • Shan

      Oh please. I can't believe it. Now that this man has committed a horrific crime he's not really your kind. It's not enough to be a Jew – there a good Jews and bad Jews. "Real" jews and those who are not pure. You would think that a group of people that has been persecuted because of their race wouldn't emulate the same racism that has oppressed them for centuries.

      July 15, 2011 at 6:35 am |
    • Muneef

      Pure or Impure ,are we talking here about "Blood Line" or "Branches of the Religion" would say it is a matter of Both Aspects...and maybe more aspects are taken into considerations that only Jew would know of.

      July 15, 2011 at 7:03 am |
    • Dwood

      Apparently "your people" aren't the last in the world to commit these crimes, ask any Palestinian.

      July 15, 2011 at 7:11 am |
    • Muneef

      Dawoud.

      Can the Palestinians be of a mixture of the natives which David was able to kill their leader in a fight for Jerusalem before he was made king....and the Children of Israel who had taken and ruled jeursalam since then all through history??

      So if yes do you suppose that now the Children of Israel are fighting among them selves?

      And would you consider that those who remained in their land Jerusalem up to date are Pure Children of Israel or those who came from other Jerusalem meaning overseas are Purer?

      Thanks&peace.

      July 15, 2011 at 7:23 am |
    • Muneef

      Correction;
      or those who came from outer Lands meaning overseas are Purer?

      July 15, 2011 at 7:28 am |
    • musings

      I see you are referring to "Mudbloods" – the way Lucius Malfoy would describe Hermione.

      July 15, 2011 at 7:44 am |
    • Julia

      I cannot believe what I just read: "There is some truth to the rumor. Jews who mixed with Black and Arab are more violent, no doubt but anything is possible." So, what you are saying is there is blatant bigotry among Jews, aimed at one another, based entirely on WHERE they are from? That gives all Abrahamic religions a black eye. Now I can clearly see the biases of the Christians (Catholic vs Protestant) and Muslims (Sunni vs Shia) spreads across the entire spectrum of faiths. Each has a sense of self-superiority based solely on the group they associate themselves with. How utterly confusing it must have been for you to grow up with the confusion of being half Ashkenazim and half Mizrachi. According to your beliefs, the Ashkenazis are the superior Jewish sect. So one parent always had a shadow of distrust in your family? How confusing it must be for you to only be half perfect. That is just sick.

      July 15, 2011 at 8:12 am |
    • Muneef

      The majority rules ....don't you see them immigrating more and more of them East Europian in to Jerusalem or say the Palestine, taking more lands building more houses...
      It is said in the Second grade are western Jews.. And so on...
      I even believe they do not accept each other in grave yards even if was killed defending Israel...!

      July 15, 2011 at 8:39 am |
    • Muneef

      Musing.

      Not aware really were the stories of what you mention come from but I would expect from Judaism since it is the eldest religion of this sort and has many books relative to subject but still yes they have this among them...and maybe among all religions even Hindu they had ranked people like that into classes the highest and lowest...as for Islam we had those who called them selves"Saddah" meaning they derive from the family of the Prophet of Islam, although we think we made this disappear but still there existing...
      Those at the highest rank or class of religious bloodlines consider them selves the Masters of the world because still all the wealth and power in their hands even if had puppet presidents...

      July 15, 2011 at 8:50 am |
  17. gees

    stupidity and arrognace, the siamese twin as the root cause of all things evil, in "we are shocked because we are a tight knit community of one religion."

    July 15, 2011 at 5:32 am |
    • Muneef

      Non of the Religious or non Religious communities are tight knit in a single or multi population bloodline or religion or branch nor a path. People of all natures there are the Good,the Evil,the Astry in between....!!

      July 15, 2011 at 6:52 am |
  18. Atsung

    Where do they get the courage to do such kind of things? jus insane!

    July 15, 2011 at 5:29 am |
    • daryx

      Courage? Courage is not preying on an 8 yr old boy. Courage would be recognizing that you are sick inside and seeking help for your urges to murder children. Courage would be battling those urges all together in the moment. I can't imagine what it would be like to be that sick inside my mind, to torture and kill a child. All I can imagine is the fear and tragedy for the child and the community and family, and the sick shame in the perpetrator when they snap out of their actions and see what they've done.

      July 15, 2011 at 6:21 am |
    • Muneef

      Some pills gives such feeling specially with those mentally or emotionally disturbed and need to use such pills for medications..which I suppose has rather given them "The Nerve" and not "The Courage" to do such an act because courage is to the braves and not for the wickeds..!

      July 15, 2011 at 6:40 am |
  19. Muneef

    During his married years, Mr Aron lived in Tennessee where he worked, among other things, as a (((( butcher)))).
    The suspect, who is ((((divorced)))
    His boss, Michael Panzer, described Mr Aron as a little "((((((emotionally disturbed))))".
    (((((Mr Aron suggests that he smothered the boy with a towel after realising that his entire neighbourhood was searching for the missing boy)))).

    As it seems the divorced emotionally disturbed was a child abuser keeping the boy for him self and couldn't release in fear from being found out as a child abuser had no choice but to destroy the evidence of child abuse and go for murder..then claim insanity as all do...

    The boy was a lovely pretty faced and very young only boy who lived among four sister...how can they can have the courage to have such a soft angel walk alone in a concrete jungle streets with so many losers, mantels & drugs  junkies...other than that there are people who trade with human parts.

    Am sure parents wanted him to feel the difference of being a man by adding him to a summer camp and give him a chance to walk home as a man...

    July 15, 2011 at 5:22 am |
    • Dan C

      what language is that your using?

      July 15, 2011 at 6:31 am |
    • IzzisGirl

      I don't see this information anywhere above. What the heck are you talking about????

      July 15, 2011 at 6:50 am |
    • musings

      Looks like the background on the killer (which I have also seen) is not widely available. Police in other cities are being asked to look into unsolved murders where he lived. Muneef has found the story elsewhere than CNN, but it is a valid story. Except I did not read about butcher (that would make him like one of the men suspected of being Jack the Ripper). I read he worked as a security guard in Memphis.

      July 15, 2011 at 7:48 am |
    • Muneef

      During his married years, Mr Aron lived in Tennessee where he worked, among other things, as a butcher.
      http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/outrage-in-brooklyns-jewish-quarter-over-boys-grisly-killing-2314028.html

      July 15, 2011 at 8:13 am |
    • Muneef

      Sorry for all the mess I made before saying things that confused me and you since the article above is not giving any details until I managed to find the independent I realize what the story was all about but here is another rich source for fresh updates followup ; 
      http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/k/leiby_kletzky/index.html

      July 15, 2011 at 8:21 am |
  20. Vence

    Umhh! Funny how Jews are trying to distance from this guy. There is good and evil in every group, and this is a sad way to realize it!

    July 15, 2011 at 4:27 am |
    • Edka

      How can you say that? Any time there is a sick story like hat it gets a lot of coverage. Just because you have a mentally disturbed, sick jew, you turn i into a racial thing. There is no nation or religion without some sick MFs

      July 15, 2011 at 6:52 am |
    • musings

      I have to disagree wtih Edka's interpretation. The fact is that close knit communities – one which even had its own investigative force out asking people questions – are shocked when something like this happened. Ordinary people in it have the first reaction that only an outsider could have done such a thing. Why? Because they think everyone within is abiding by the same standards they are. Imagine if this happened in Amish country or in a posh neighborhood where people trust their neighbors to enter their houses when they go on holiday. It used to be that small communities in the US prided themselves on never locking their doors. Then something happens which reveals that evil people exist in every environment – not as many as in some, but they exploit the trust to do their crimes. I've seen lots of quotes (even here) from people trying to construct the killer into an outsider by virtue of his non-Ashkenazi breeding, but that isn't going to work. It's just a shame for the whole community. I suppose it is comforting to know it wasn't a real Jekyll and Hyde seeming good guy, but a marginal kind of person.

      July 15, 2011 at 7:57 am |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.