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August 3rd, 2011
07:50 PM ET

Air Force: Bible and nukes don't mix

By, Barbara Starr and Jennifer Rizzo, CNN

Washington (CNN)–The Air Force has suspended an ethics briefing for new missile launch officers after concerns were raised about the briefing's heavy focus on religion.

The briefing, taught for nearly 20 years by military chaplains at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, is intended to train Air Force personnel to consider the ethics and morality of launching nuclear weapons - the ultimate doomsday machine.

Many of the slides in the 43 page presentation use a Christian justification for war, displaying pictures of saints like Saint Augustine and using biblical references.

"Abraham organized an Army to rescue Lot," one slide read, referring to the story of the Hebrew patriarch and his nephew found in the book of Genesis.

"Revelation 19:11 Jesus Christ is the mighty warrior," another slide read.

The Air Force halted the class last week after 31 missile launch officers reported the religious nature of the briefing to the Military Religious Freedom Foundation, a watchdog group which tries to ensure religious freedom among the troops.

"There were several things that they found disgusting," Mikey Weinstein founder of the foundation said. "The first was the fact that there is actually a slide that makes it clear that they're trying to teach that, under fundamentalist Christian doctrine, war is a good thing."

Weinstein said his group had to act.

"We were literally blown away by what we saw on the slide presentation. And one of the first things I did was to contact some of the most senior leadership for the Air Force in the Pentagon and made it very clear that this has to stop immediately," Weinstein said.

The Air Force said headquarters officials were not aware of the religious component of the ethics course, despite it being taught for nearly two decades by chaplains.  The matter came to their attention they said when they received an inquiry by Truthout.org, an online publication which initially reported the story.

Here is a link to the story and associated slides CNN obtained from Truthout.org.

"That is when we became aware of concerns about the course and our commander here reviewed the course and decided immediately that it was not appropriate for what we want to do and suspended using that briefing," David Smith, an Air Education Training Command spokesman said.

The briefing was meant to mimic an academic setting where concerns could be voiced, according to Smith who claims chaplains were used to oversee the briefing for that reason.

"A chaplain is not required to take action if concerns are voiced," Smith said.

A review is underway at the base to see if an ethics briefing is needed at all.

"Ethics discussions are an important part of professional military development and it is especially important for our airmen who are training to work with nuclear weapons because they have to make hard decisions," Smith said.  "We are looking to see if we need a briefing like this... but it will not be a religion based briefing."

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Belief • Christianity • Church and state • Military • United States

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soundoff (1,189 Responses)
  1. chad

    So….. the Chaplain was talking about religion? Oh no
    And Weinstein was LITERALLY blown away by this-

    August 4, 2011 at 4:05 pm |
    • Mark9988

      "I was artificially appalled."

      August 4, 2011 at 4:24 pm |
    • Wes

      Yeah, I hate when people misuse the word literally. It seems to be a much more common thing to do these days too. Everyone says things are literal when they're not, simply for effect, and I hate it because it is completely wrong. He actually means he was FIGURATIVELY blown away by this, not literally. GOD that bothers me!

      August 4, 2011 at 4:25 pm |
    • NOo..oON

      The first time I walked behind a working jet engine I was LITERALLY blown away.

      August 4, 2011 at 5:51 pm |
  2. lloyd roberts

    The air force for some reason has always had this white christian slant to it. Not the other armed forces, but just the airforce. Many cadets and soldiers complain regularly about the airforce and it's heavy pressure to be born again or convert or even to secular christians, make them feel uneasy because they are not devout

    August 4, 2011 at 4:00 pm |
  3. William Demuth

    What's wrong with ever1 on these message boreds? can't we all just have a little peice. dont drop out of high school kids, its haunted me ever sense.

    August 4, 2011 at 4:00 pm |
    • William Demuth

      Once again my dopelganger strikes!

      Actually, please do drop out! Poor Chrisitains are cheaper to hire than Mexicans, and I need more peasents to enrich me!

      August 4, 2011 at 4:09 pm |
  4. Kelly

    Any ethical discussion apart from the revealed Word of God, is mearly opinion swapping. Without God, there is no authority-we are headed towards anarchy. A kingdom divided can not stand.

    August 4, 2011 at 3:57 pm |
    • Ben

      That is the dumbest thing I have ever heard. Go crawl back under your rock.

      August 4, 2011 at 4:05 pm |
    • Thor

      Uhmmm. Oops!? Which God are you referring to? Is it the "Christian" Baptist God? Is it the "Christian" Methodist God? Is it the "Antichrist" Catholic God? Is it the .... hmm... PURITAN God? Maybe I should just assume it is the ... ah.... Wiccan God?

      August 4, 2011 at 4:07 pm |
    • Bill Sargent

      Whatever.

      August 4, 2011 at 4:08 pm |
    • wgage

      Kelly, that's just plain dumb.

      August 4, 2011 at 4:10 pm |
    • William Demuth

      Kelly

      Is Allah invited? Or Buddah? Or Vishnu?

      More believe in them than your Jesus

      August 4, 2011 at 4:13 pm |
    • OriginalPledge

      Ethics discussion and revelation existed long before the man-selection of a group of stories and books into a single book never intended to be read by the common person. Gutenberg is the great hero in that everyone had access to the foiables exposed by dispassionate and measured reading.

      August 4, 2011 at 4:13 pm |
  5. bu

    ALL Religion is a disease of the Mind! Be part of the cure, not the problem!

    Help cure the religion disease!

    August 4, 2011 at 3:57 pm |
    • Joxer the Mighty

      Oh yes, because believing that a really long time ago everything was a big ball that exploded and created the universe and life on earth completely by accident is so much smarter to believe.

      August 4, 2011 at 4:02 pm |
    • Fullbag

      And you suggest we cure the 'religion disease' by turning to the government for answers? Yeah, that has been working really well for atheists and agnostics, don't you think?

      August 4, 2011 at 4:03 pm |
    • Ben

      Actually, believing in the big bang theory makes a lot more scientific sense than believing in some magic sky genie

      August 4, 2011 at 4:06 pm |
    • GeorgeW

      What did the other 20 years' worth of students do? How could sane people endure this for so long? FINALLY! Yes! Keep gods out of the military and government. One day the preferred god may not be yours.

      August 4, 2011 at 4:07 pm |
    • Kenny

      Where did he say anything about turning to government for answers?

      August 4, 2011 at 4:13 pm |
    • Fullbag

      Ben – I challenge to stop and think about the complexity of our ecosystem, sea life, atmosphere, gravitational pull, habitational climate, water cycle, and a hundred other things on earth that allows mankind to survive. Then, add on top of that the perfection of everything in the universe.

      Sorry, but evolution is a vastly more grand fairy tale when you sit down and actually consider it than the allowance of a Creator.

      August 4, 2011 at 4:14 pm |
    • Cedar Rapids

      'Fullbag – Ben – I challenge to stop and think about the complexity of our ecosystem, sea life, atmosphere, gravitational pull, habitational climate, water cycle, and a hundred other things on earth that allows mankind to survive. Then, add on top of that the perfection of everything in the universe.'

      Mankind is the way it is BECAUSE of the system we evolved into, the system didn't evolve to our needs. And seriously, perfection of the universe? under what definition is the universe perfect?

      August 4, 2011 at 4:17 pm |
    • Fullbag

      Cedar Rapids – Neither we nor the world evolved, period. Science not only has not proved evolution, but the idea is unraveling more and more as time goes on. More questions are appearing than answers.

      The universe is 'perfect' in the sense that there is not unmitigated chaos. Everything exists and perpetuates in grand harmony. Somehow you though think that is all by chance?

      August 4, 2011 at 4:29 pm |
    • Magic

      Fullbag,

      " I challenge to stop and think about the complexity of our ecosystem, sea life, atmosphere, gravitational pull, habitational climate, water cycle, and a hundred other things on earth that allows mankind to survive. Then, add on top of that the perfection of everything in the universe."

      If the characteristics of Earth were different, we might not be here... but then again, we might be even better - sturdier bodies, larger, more active brains, longer life spans to figure things out, etc. Gravity works ok, and we have adjusted to it, but perhaps it could have been designed better.

      Perfection? Nope. Things goes awry all the time in the universe... stuff crashing into other stuff and making a big mess. Even Earth will be eliminated some day when our star goes kaput.

      August 4, 2011 at 4:29 pm |
    • Fullbag

      Magic – You mean, we could be closer to perfection, like, Adam and Eve were before they sinned? 😉

      Science HAS proven that any slight variance on numerous issues here on earth would make the planet unsuitable for human life. If the earth rotated any slower, half of the planet would burn while the other half froze. If any faster, gale force winds would destory much of the surface of the ground. Any closer to the sun, and we would burn, while any closer to the moon would pull it into our gravitational pull and both would be destroyed.

      Those couple examples are just a drop in the bucket as to the perfection of our world. Just because certain things in the universe collide, explode, or implode does not note imperfection. There is no reason to think that isn't part of a Grand Design.

      August 4, 2011 at 4:39 pm |
    • Laughing

      @Fullbag

      First, since we're on an elliptical orbit, we do constantly get closer and further to the sun all the time. In fact, earthquakes have enough force to wobble us closer. Secondly, what magic is telling you is that humans are the PRODUCT of the environment around us, we weren't made and then had the environment made around us, geddit? if any of the things happened the way you said they did, who's to say we wouldn't have adapted? Also he makes the excellent point of how incredibly screwed up the universe is, it's not really perfect at all.

      Nevermind though, I'm sure you saw the first line and thought "LALALALALALALA"

      August 4, 2011 at 4:44 pm |
    • Nonimus

      @Fullbag,
      Aren't you surprised to be alive? I mean you very well might have been born in the middle of the ocean and drowned, the earth being 70+% water after all. You only had a 30% chance of survival.

      Of course, why your mother would be out in the middle of the ocean giving birth is a good question, but then we'd have to get into conditional probabilities and that's too much effort. Kind of like the probability of life evolving on this planet given the condition that it was already in the habitable zone, i.e. the right distance from the Sun.

      August 4, 2011 at 4:59 pm |
  6. fasteddie

    By reporting the extreme religious nature of those slide, the soldiers acted in the best tradition of this American republic.

    Religious fanatics are going to kill us all. Best to root these wackjobs out of every position of power before it is too late.

    August 4, 2011 at 3:56 pm |
    • Thor

      I too have reservations about which God it is that the "Christian" religions speak of. Having been born Catholic and now ...probably not.... I wonder if the "Baptist" God would allow the "Puritan" God to have "His" will upon the women of the "Baptist" congregation. Woe be it onto the meek to have their women mind as such by the "Amish" God!

      August 4, 2011 at 4:11 pm |
  7. Mahna Mahna

    Why should it be okay for our military to act just like Muslim extremists? Killing is always immoral and wrong but sometimes we have no other options readily available - but it is never justified and definitely should never be treated as a good thing. Horrible things need to be done at times because we still don't have the knowledge and technology to avoid it, but nobody should be taught to believe that a higher power wants them to kill. Anyone who thinks killing is ever justified is being driven by their own animal instincts.

    August 4, 2011 at 3:56 pm |
    • Mark from Middle River

      Agreed ,

      August 4, 2011 at 4:00 pm |
    • William Demuth

      Quite accurate.

      August 4, 2011 at 4:22 pm |
  8. JiminTX

    The Christ Cults and their Invisible Sky Friend must be sad.

    August 4, 2011 at 3:54 pm |
    • Fullbag

      Not really. Any true Christian would follow Jesus' command to be 'no part of the world'. The Bible has no place mixing with politics and war. Apparently though, you feel war IS the answer to mankind's problems. You go boy!

      August 4, 2011 at 4:06 pm |
    • Thor

      I DO recall a Jewish fellow who "...fashioned a whip made of cord...."! I also recall that same Jewish fellow who (even though he was all knowing) ... allowed his disciples to carry a weapon of war; a sword, and use it in the Garden of Gethseminii! Of course the Jewish fellow had the man put his sword away and heal the soldiers ear back into place, but, nonetheless: He didn't have him throw the sword away.... just put it away in the sheath on his belt. Apparently, it was ok to carry for use later! How..... uhmmm.... "Christian".

      August 4, 2011 at 4:15 pm |
    • Normon

      @Fullbag
      "Any true Christian would follow Jesus' command to be 'no part of the world'."
      So what are you doing commenting on a web site?

      August 4, 2011 at 4:20 pm |
    • Fullbag

      That certain Jesus fellow made a whip to drive out the money changers who were defiling the house of his Father. That in no way condons war any more than the thought of 'spare the rod, spoil the child'. You are reaching.

      As far as Jesus telling his apostles in a given instance to carry a sword, it was obviously meant for means of defense IF necessary. Please cite any passage where you find where Jesus advocates violence.

      August 4, 2011 at 4:21 pm |
  9. So, you mean

    Yipee, we get to usher in Jesus' return if we launch our missiles! woohooo! 0-o

    August 4, 2011 at 3:54 pm |
  10. Jeff

    I will, but most here won't, thank God we have a country (so far) that allows us to speak our minds and disagree on matters such as this.
    Those who won't thank God, go thank the primordial ooze you came from.

    August 4, 2011 at 3:49 pm |
    • JeramieH

      How about thanking the founding fathers who thought those freedoms were important from the beginning?

      August 4, 2011 at 3:52 pm |
    • Eytan Weber

      *we came from

      August 4, 2011 at 3:54 pm |
    • wgage

      Why thank anyone or thing. Thanking, for your existance is a religious thing. Stupid.

      August 4, 2011 at 3:56 pm |
    • Darwin Rules

      If I came from the primordial ooze then so did you. You belong to the same species as I do; sadly so.

      August 4, 2011 at 3:58 pm |
    • Theia

      Theia is the name they gave the planet that we shared an orbit with.....We crashed, absorbed it and threw off what later became the moon........This started the chain of events that lead to the ooze so can I thank Theia? Is that ok to thank an inanimate object over a make believe?

      August 4, 2011 at 4:02 pm |
    • Cedar Rapids

      'that allows us to speak our minds and disagree on matters such as this.
      Those who won't thank God, go thank the primordial ooze you came from'

      So wait, the people that dont thank god you want to just go back to the ooze but you also thank god for having a country where people are allowed to speak their minds and disagree?

      August 4, 2011 at 4:12 pm |
  11. Alex

    Terrifying that the military allows any religious influence to be fostered in the area of nuclear armaments.

    August 4, 2011 at 3:48 pm |
    • ynotgetalong

      No, sad to have proven that fundamentalist Christian doctrine is actually quite violent. We Christians insist how violent a religion Islam is, and blame that as the cause for terrorism, only to find out that our military uses fundamentalist Christian doctrine to justify that dropping nuclear weapons is a good thing? Only proves once again how more alike we all are...

      August 4, 2011 at 4:01 pm |
  12. Jason

    I swear we the people of the United States of America have forgotten what this country was founded upon. When I was in grade school we put our right hands on our hearts and sang the pledge of allegiance to america as a reminder. A reminder of what this country was about and what millions of men and women gave their lives for. Policy! Bill of Rights! Declaration of Independence. "In God We Trust!" FREEDOM! That is what the United States is about. Unfortunately, we are letting these nitwits and pus#$@W like William Demuth, act as a parasitic twerp, regulate our natural born freedoms. "Christianity, if true, is either infinitely important or not important at all. The one thing it cannot be is moderately important." That is why people died for the blossom of this country, they believed infinitely. It was enough for them to die. "If you dont like it go live in russia", that is what my Grandmother used to tell me. Now I am old enough to appreciate her noble loyalist view on being a proud American, you should do the same of get the hell out!

    August 4, 2011 at 3:48 pm |
    • aahawks

      I haven't forgot what this Country was founded on: RELIGIOUS FREEDOM.

      August 4, 2011 at 3:53 pm |
    • Hahaha

      Wow. No matter how long I have lived in the south, the ignorance of a large portion of America still manages to shock me. Keep living in your fantasy white man world my friend. The world is changing and for the most part it's better. People like you however who cling to the old ways however will be left behind. Can't wait

      August 4, 2011 at 3:56 pm |
    • Eytan Weber

      Are you honestly saying that if you're not a god-fearing believer, you should leave America?

      August 4, 2011 at 3:56 pm |
    • ReallyNow

      Just a bit of history, In God We Trust was added to the pledge during the Red Scare for fear of communist godlessness. It wasnt part of the original pledge.

      August 4, 2011 at 3:57 pm |
    • Jeff in Illinois

      I can't think of anything more anti-American that a forced daily loyalty oath to the state.

      August 4, 2011 at 3:59 pm |
    • aguywhoisnotasignroantasyou

      Umm, you do know that we didn't put "In God we Trust" on coinage until 1864, and not on paper currency until 1954 – the same year the phrase "under god" was added to the pledge of allegiance right?

      August 4, 2011 at 4:00 pm |
    • Candid One

      Many atheists, agnostics, and non-christians have also died for this country. Considering that this country was actually "founded" over profits, such coveting of origination is a bogus pride, which is quaintly Christian.

      August 4, 2011 at 4:01 pm |
    • slinky

      so are you saying the bible condones nuclear warfare? awesome!

      August 4, 2011 at 4:02 pm |
    • wuditdo!!

      ..."in god we trust" was added to the dollar in the 50's... along with " one nation under good". just thought i'd share that with you.

      August 4, 2011 at 4:02 pm |
    • musicguy1953

      I'd suggest you read what the founding fathers actually wrote about religion and its role in the new American society. Most of them were Deists and wanted religion to play NO PART in the political and social life of the nation other than as a moral compass. As Jefferson said, "We must always strive to act as a Christian nation, but must never accept a Christian government."
      The whistleblowers were absolutely right to eliminate this fundamentalist propaganda from discussions of using the most horrific weapons in human history. Compassion, logic and reason must prevail...not faux Christian justifications for the actions these officers may be called upon to take.

      August 4, 2011 at 4:13 pm |
    • ynotgetalong

      Nothing you brought up mentions "iIn fundamentalist Christianity we trust" I think God (Allah, Jaweh, pick a name) would is pretty disgusted with how his name has been used to justify many violent things. And do you really believe God likes us best? Why would a god who created all of the universe pick favorites?

      August 4, 2011 at 4:15 pm |
    • William Demuth

      Jason

      I am more American than your whole broken gene line.

      Seek growth outside your cult and someday you might understand.

      August 4, 2011 at 4:30 pm |
  13. Hypocrits

    what's more logical, that an all powerful being said "poof" and two people showed up in the middle of africa and now we have people of different races? or that a group of smart guys a couple thousand years ago thought ahead and realized how much anarchy their would be if people didn't fear some type of being. Could you imagine the chaos there would be if there wasn't religion?

    August 4, 2011 at 3:47 pm |
    • Hypocrits

      lets no forget the wealthiest organization/business in the world is the catholic church.

      August 4, 2011 at 3:49 pm |
    • Joxer the Mighty

      Which is more logical? That a really long time ago there was a hot ball of everything that exploded for some unknown reason and created the universe and life on earth by accident, or that an intelligent being that exists outside of our known dimensions created everything we know?

      August 4, 2011 at 3:58 pm |
    • musicguy1953

      I can easily imagine the world being FAR better off without the fairy tales of religion.

      August 4, 2011 at 4:07 pm |
    • ynotgetalong

      What's more logical – that the God who created ALL OF US wants us to go around dropping nukes on a part of his creation, or that the military is wrong to use to use any religion as justification for the goodness of dropping weapons of mass destruction on parts of God's creation.

      August 4, 2011 at 4:08 pm |
  14. Matt

    Cue up the zealotry screaming about Christianity being under, "attack."

    August 4, 2011 at 3:47 pm |
  15. Carl, Secaucus, NJ

    Jesus compared those who claim to speak God's will to trees: judge them by whether they grow good fruit or bad. Since when after you die it's too late to worry about preachers, he must have meant "is this preaching changing the world for better or worse?" For that reason I'm not impressed by people who say they've got a "moral code," whether religious or otherwise. I'm impressed when what they actually DO is moral. Better a kind believer than a mean unbeliever, and better a kind unbeliever than a mean believer.

    I think nuclear weapons are more a symbol of the world's fallen moral state than anything you should be proud to work with as a Christian. If those chaplains were trying to say airmen should be OK with it because of something in Revelation, that's grotesque and not very far from a suicide bomber's mentality ("This bomb is God's instrument, so it's OK!").

    August 4, 2011 at 3:46 pm |
    • William Demuth

      True Carl!

      I am pleased to see some Christians are willing to admit how sick this is!

      August 4, 2011 at 3:50 pm |
    • Mark from Middle River

      A few of us have said the same thing a few pages back and now Willy is waking up and actually reading post from Christians.

      Amazing. I declare, lack of communication.

      August 4, 2011 at 4:06 pm |
    • William Demuth

      Mark

      For each rational response I get a dozen mental patients quoting scripture.

      What is it with Christianity and the mentaly ill?

      August 4, 2011 at 4:15 pm |
    • Mark from Middle River

      >>>”For each rational response I get a dozen mental patients quoting scripture.
      What is it with Christianity and the mentally ill?”
      Well, in my almost a year posting on the Belief Blog, I have observed that more often than not it is the learned Atheist that post scripture with their own tali-banish interpretation expecting all Christians to see it the same way.

      So to to answer your question … Christianity and … the Atheist … Each is just putting forth to the public what they feel and hold dear to their hearts.

      August 4, 2011 at 4:20 pm |
    • William Demuth

      Mark from Middle River

      Yes the Athiest offers freedom and hope, and the Christian offers indoctrination and slavery.

      Free your mind while you still can!

      August 4, 2011 at 4:31 pm |
  16. John C

    The war thing I can understand, but the nuke part is a non-starter for the Christian. And I wonder how the US government can juggle these "ethics discussions" while maintaining what is clearly a policy open to the use of nuclear weapons, which the Catholic Church has consistently affirmed "is a crime against God and man, which merits firm and unequivocal condemnation". It seems that such an ethics discussion would be pretty clear-cut: the use of nuclear weapons is unethical. Don't try to hide behind a presentation based on morality.

    One would really have to go off the deep end morally to participate in such a crime.

    August 4, 2011 at 3:46 pm |
    • William Demuth

      I agree

      Alas military training, like religion, is merely indoctrination.

      Rest assured MANY would gladly push the button. I suspect many actually fantasize about it.

      August 4, 2011 at 3:54 pm |
    • JeramieH

      What makes nukes unique for the church? Just a louder bang than gunpowder.

      August 4, 2011 at 4:01 pm |
    • Thor

      Hey John C, you know, that's the whole thing about the Catholic church... I mean... the Pope continues to allow priests to keep their nuts even after having molested little boys. Sure, Catholic priests aren't the only ones... there are others, but, the Catholic church was a machine to collect taxes, wage "christian" war, etc... even vestiges of armed men, who guard the Vatican exist with pikes and armor and all. And then there was Saint Olaf who cut heads off of the Norse who would not convert. Then there was the Spanish Inquisition. I could go on and on, but, you know, this whole god thing.... I just can't seem to figure out which one to believe in. Is it Martin Luther's God? Is it Calvin's?.... Buhda? Allah? Mohammad? ... Kinda not an easy pick. Guess I shall just go with my ancestors' gods; you know, the "false" gods. Perhaps Odin can lend a hand?

      August 4, 2011 at 4:31 pm |
  17. Angela

    I served 11 years in the AF. During that time I saw some religious zealots, but not to the degree you'd think reading CNN's articles on the USAF Academy case several years ago (and yes it WAS heavily covered in the news) or this nuclear weapons officer briefing. I also had the joy of being actively persecuted by my atheist senior NCO because of my beliefs who openly espoused that anyone who believed in got was a moron and treated anyone who did even worse than she treated the others.

    I can see how this briefing survived in that form as long as it has. It was written over 20 years ago, probably by a chaplain, who has long since retired. The only people to see it during that time are a small number of chaplains administering the program, a relatively small number of NWOs who didn't want to make waves and risk being persecuted for whistleblowing. In the military you can be absolutely right and your chain of command even agree with you and whistleblowing bring consequences on your head anyway. Don't mistake isolated actions as military policy. It isn't.

    August 4, 2011 at 3:45 pm |
  18. Mike

    I was an ICBM launch control officer and went through this training at Vandenberg AFB back in 05. I am atheist and would have taken offense of this course had it been shown to me, but to my recollection it wasn't, so I have to figure this was someone doing their own thing and got caught, despite it saying the course had been given for the past 20 years. Certainly there was talk of the ethics and morality of nukes when I had the class, but I don't remember any religious references, and that's the kind of thing I think would have stood out.

    August 4, 2011 at 3:45 pm |
    • Mark from Middle River

      >>>"Christian Defense Fund to my rescue?"

      "No, I wouldn't touch a leper for a thousand pounds; yet I willingly cure him for the love of God. " Mother Teresa 🙂

      August 4, 2011 at 4:23 pm |
  19. William Demuth

    The other me is an imposter....I am the real William Demuth!!!! What a troll imposter looser imbacile. Yes I did drop out of high school bc of religious BS, but im definately smart! My intellectual superiority is the shiznit!!!

    August 4, 2011 at 3:44 pm |
    • William Demuth

      Please excuse my son.

      His mother was a Christian bimbo I bought for a few sheckels and he has been a thorn in my side ever since.

      I guess than Thalidimyde enema I gave his mom in an attempt to terminate him really just toasted his common sense centers.

      August 4, 2011 at 3:52 pm |
    • William Demuth

      Please excuse my father.....me continuously beats me and performs unnatural duties and then tries to blame it on Christians. He just espouses his own insecurities and fallacies on other people which helps him cope with insuperiour self. Claiming he is intellectually superior on a CNN message board is equivalent to his true worth.

      August 4, 2011 at 3:58 pm |
    • Mark from Middle River

      Even though I think William is silly and hateful. The stealing of another handle is way wrong.

      Beat him on his arguments. It is childish to stoop to such a level just to get under the skin of someone who you disagree with.

      August 4, 2011 at 4:09 pm |
    • William Demuth

      Christian Defense Fund to my rescue?

      His ramblings just serve my purpose.

      It demonstrates Christian virtue, and states volumes towards the argument about Christ fiends and nuclear weapons!

      August 4, 2011 at 4:11 pm |
    • Mark from Middle River

      >>>"Christian Defense Fund to my rescue?"

      Maybe ....

      "No, I wouldn't touch a leper for a thousand pounds; yet I willingly cure him for the love of God. " Mother Teresa 🙂

      August 4, 2011 at 4:24 pm |
    • William Demuth

      Mark

      Again I spat on your salvation.

      It is a lie for weak minds and a tool for evil doers.

      I refuse your faith and refute your fellow followers.

      August 4, 2011 at 4:33 pm |
  20. gary

    I'm sure OUR god wants us to nuke THOSE sinners over THERE. .... THEY don't look like US.

    The epitome of human ignorance

    August 4, 2011 at 3:44 pm |
    • Joxer the Mighty

      The true Christian is like Abraham Lincoln: "My concern is not whether God is on our side; my greatest concern is to be on God's side, for God is always right."

      August 4, 2011 at 3:54 pm |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.