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September 1st, 2011
10:24 AM ET

My Faith: Rep. Keith Ellison, from Catholic to Muslim

By Chris Welch, CNN

Minneapolis, Minnesota (CNN) -Prior to 2006, few people even knew that then-Minnesota state legislator Keith Ellison was a Muslim. Because of his English name, he said, no one thought to ask.

But five years ago, when he ran for a seat in the United States House of Representatives - a race he would go on to win - word of his religious affiliation began to spread.

“When I started running for Congress it actually took me by surprise that so many people were fascinated with me being the first Muslim in Congress,” said Ellison, a Democrat now serving his third term in the House.

“But someone said to me, ‘Look Keith, think of a person of Japanese origin running for Congress six years after Pearl Harbor–this might be a news story.’”

Though Ellison's status as the first Muslim elected to Congress is widely known, fewer are aware that he was born into a Catholic family in Detroit and was brought up attending Catholic schools.

But he said he was never comfortable with that faith.

“I just felt it was ritual and dogma,” Ellison said. “Of course, that’s not the reality of Catholicism, but it’s the reality I lived. So I just kind of lost interest and stopped going to Mass unless I was required to.”

It wasn’t until he was a student at Wayne State University in Detroit when Ellison began, “looking for other things.”

He doesn’t have an elaborate explanation of what led him to convert to Islam in college, though he said he was “drawn to the multi-national congregation.”

“I would really like to hear somebody who is really articulate about the elements of their faith conversion. I'm not,” he said. "I investigated it, it worked for me, and it made me have a sense of inspiration and wonder, and I became a Muslim. It's been working for me ever since.”

Ellison's political opponents have made his faith an issue in his congressional campaigns.

“I would caution [opponents] that it doesn't work. People are not hateful like that," he said. "If you come up saying, ‘Vote for me because Ellison is a Muslim and I’m not,’ nine out of ten voters are going to see that as the silliness that it is.”

“It doesn't hurt my feelings at all," he said. "In fact I actually feel sorry for these people.”

And he said he has never had a second thought about converting.

“My faith and my identity as a Muslim - I never saw it as something that made my job harder," he said. "It’s just an aspect of who I am. It's the time that we live in. We have to respond to the realities of the world we’re in.”

But Ellison acknowledges that his faith has given him something of a national profile, not always in ways that are welcome.

In March, he testified in nationally televised congressional hearings, called by Rep. Peter King, a New York Republican, to explore what King said was radicalization in American Muslim communities.

At the hearing, Ellison choked up as he described the sacrifices of Muslim Americans who tried to save others in the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

“Without any of my choosing or desire I became somewhat of a symbolic figure," Ellison said. "And I urge anyone to avoid becoming a symbolic figure if you can. But I ended up in that position, so I just figured why not talk about it? Why not help try to bring people together with it?”

“Faith really should be a bridge, not a wall," Ellison said. "Because at the end of the day we should be focusing on what you believe, not what your religion is.”

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Belief • Catholic Church • Islam

soundoff (1,073 Responses)
  1. Nathan

    Ellison seems like a decent man, but why is this interesting? He seems to have nothing to say about his former Catholicism (and hardly any understanding of it) or his current adherence to Islam ("It works for me"). The ignorance of religion, of the forms of thought and life and sociality that it has produced, is just mind-boggling. People tend to focus either on the worst manifestations of religion (and so denounce it) or on their own private relationship with it (it works for me). It's slightly more complicated than that.

    September 1, 2011 at 4:18 pm |
    • CalgarySandy

      The study of Christianity from inception to the present is a huge area of study. You have to start with the Classical philosophers and Classical history just to get the background. I pursued it as necessary to the study of European history. I was raised in a Baptist Church so I had the Biblical side and, as an adult, read other translations. I am steeped in it from a life time of studying what people believe and how it affects their world. I do it out of interest now. It is simply not possible to know it all. Anyone with any clue about it would know this instead of sneering at those who believe without this kind of background. It is not necessary for most humans to know any of this to have faith. It is only when they start to shot their mouths off about it incorrectly that it matters. As long as they live quiet, ethical and humane lives it does not matter at all. It is my belief that you cannot understand a people unless you understand what they believe in. Alas, that the Fundamentalists are such bad examples of what Jesus, if he even existed, taught.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:54 pm |
  2. KM

    Religion is the opiate of the masses. It's a shame (to me) that I have to live during a time period in which our species is controlled by such idiotic endeavors as religion.

    September 1, 2011 at 4:17 pm |
  3. jerricho

    My only question is has your faith or lack thereof made you a better person today than you were yesterday? If so, good for you, otherwise I don't really care apart from simple curiosity.

    September 1, 2011 at 4:17 pm |
    • The Real Tom Paine

      My lack of faith frees me from excuses. I assume responisbility, or I try to find a rational explanation for what happens. If I can't find one, I move on.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:22 pm |
    • jerricho

      Then Tom I applaud your choice just as I do a person who chooses faith and becomes a better member of society. I could care less what you are Atheist, Agnostic, Wiccan, Jewish, Muslim, Mormon, Christian, Taoist, Hindu, or Pastafari, if it makes you better, good for you.

      September 1, 2011 at 5:09 pm |
  4. KSam

    Don't hate. All Muslims are not Arabs, and all Arabs are not Muslims. Anybody can be a Muslim, and everyone is different. Muslim is someone who submits himself/herself to God, and believe in one God and Muhammad as the prophet and messenger of God. Muslims also believe in other prophets before Muhammad, and they include Adam, Abraham, Moses, and Jesus. Muslims believe God sent many prophets to the earth to guide mankind, and the last of the prophet was Muhammad. The Koran is believed to be the holy scripture sent to Mankind for guidance. The wonderful thing about Islam is that anybody can join and it's really easy. All you have to do is say, "La ila ha il lal la hu, muhammadur rasool ullah" (there is no God but Allah, and Muhammad is his messenger). Learn and follow the five pillars of Islam (Testimony of faith, prayer, supporting the needy, fasting in the month of Ramadan, and the pilgrimage to Mecca if possible). Being a devout Muslim is not easy, because it's challenging. If you can live up to the challenge, your reward is in the afterlife according to the religion. Islam does not teach hate or evil in my opinion, Islam is a very peaceful and prospering religion. It helps people to live their life with dignity and respect and gives people hope to work harder and help each other. Islam, Christianity, and Judaism are very similar in their source of origin, but the difference is Islam is the final revelation of guidance to mankind according to the religion. Think of it like a book being updated from 2nd to 3rd edition. Hope that helps some people to realize education is the key to understanding and finding a common ground in all people, no matter what your religion, ethnicity, and culture is.

    September 1, 2011 at 4:16 pm |
    • KM

      I have nothing against Muslims, any more than I have against any religious people. I find Jews, Muslims, and Christians to all be equally ignorant.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:24 pm |
    • John

      let's start with this simple one; let those people in every Moslem countries chooses what kind of faith they believe in, no threat, no prosecution, no killings. Let your Moslem brothers be free in whatever they believe in cause faith has no value if it is forced. Then, I will buy whatever you say.

      September 1, 2011 at 6:27 pm |
  5. irish man

    another guy who is using religion to make a name for himself...pathetic little mother ducker

    September 1, 2011 at 4:16 pm |
    • David Melb

      Read the article again, he was Muslim before his career in the House.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:23 pm |
  6. Colin

    He left Catholicism for Islam becuase Catholicism was all "ritual and dogma" Ever heard the expression "out of the frying pan and into the fire?"

    September 1, 2011 at 4:08 pm |
    • TheTruth72

      I was born into catholicism as well. I felt the same way. I looked into Christianity as a whole and read the Bible about a year ago and that made more sense than the man-made tradition.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:19 pm |
    • huh?

      That is so true! Islam is no better. Here comes the great Islamisation of America and the end of this great nation. This is really sad. America is a great place to be. Islam is accomplishing it's goal.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:25 pm |
  7. Ash

    oh and that applies for anyone who does not believe in God.

    September 1, 2011 at 4:07 pm |
    • The Real Tom Paine

      Let me guess: you don't read any books by Stephen hawking, do you?

      September 1, 2011 at 4:14 pm |
  8. thinking ahead

    what religion isn't ritual and dogma?

    September 1, 2011 at 4:06 pm |
  9. Ash

    Dear Reality: You are the one who's lost and Godless. One day you will realize your mistake, but by then I suspect it will be too late.

    September 1, 2011 at 4:03 pm |
    • The Real Tom Paine

      Ash,

      Have you read any books by Stephen Hawking lately?

      September 1, 2011 at 4:13 pm |
    • EL

      Truth.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:17 pm |
  10. sage

    i do no support any religion.
    why is it the black person? i wonder if any white/caucasian does this.

    September 1, 2011 at 4:02 pm |
  11. Bill Wagner

    Good for you Keith. You found something that you believe in. The least people can do is respect that.

    September 1, 2011 at 4:02 pm |
    • gager

      Terrorists have something they believe in. Do you respect that? Idiot.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:15 pm |
    • Scott

      But they won't. They're all more interested in criticizing individual beliefs, and fighting each other to see who can make the most anti-(insert belief system here) comments before the topic is locked.

      Guess what? A good aetheist doesn't attack a religious person, and vice-versa. All the spiteful comments from both sides are all out of identical people.

      Believe what you want to. Congratulations on your ability to choose/rationalize/take a leap of faith/adopt your view! Now realize that I have a right to believe what I want to, and that it might not be the same.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:16 pm |
  12. Sal

    I would never vote for any of those religious freaks that are running in the republican party! 

    September 1, 2011 at 3:59 pm |
  13. Sal

    The world would be a much nicer, peaceful, and safer world if everyone was an atheist! 

    September 1, 2011 at 3:58 pm |
    • Chuck Anziulewicz

      Word.

      September 1, 2011 at 3:59 pm |
    • Sam

      Yes it would – It is always amazing to see other wise intelligent people believe in made up theology

      September 1, 2011 at 4:01 pm |
    • zealot

      The only good atheist is a dead atheist.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:07 pm |
    • J.C.

      Clever fiction writers often come up with "religions" that make much more sense than those offered from the 2000 year old plate of middle eastern goat herders.

      "It's an energy field created by all living things. It surrounds us, penetrates us, and binds the galaxy together..." I could get behind that. A god who burns bushes, slays cities of innocent children, floods the world, and induces fathers to sacrifice their children is not for me.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:10 pm |
    • Rachel

      Oh, yes and that worked so well in Russia....

      September 1, 2011 at 4:10 pm |
    • WickedNorth

      What does religion have to do with it? Religion has less to do with it than you think.

      For example, look at the Crusade. The first one was launched because the Pope wanted knights out of Europe so as to bring some peace. The last Crusade was launched because the Venice wanted the ports in the Holy Land; it was even condemned by the Pope. Bin Laden hates US because of how they broke all their promises during the Afghan-Soviet war, and how they put him on a assassination list after the war. Also, having so many troops in the Middle East doesn't help, either.

      Like I said, religion is the justification, rarely the cause. The Pope and bin Laden used religion to justify their action but the cause is something else entirely.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:12 pm |
    • gager

      Rachel, atheism is not communism.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:13 pm |
    • doug

      I guess you mean the John Lennon – Yoko Ono religion, where there is no hope after you die ? aka.. No heaven for little babies in Somalia who die of starvation, and conversely, no Hell for atheists like Hitler who killed 6 million ? ( or Idi Amin, or Stalin, or Mao, or Pol Pot etc. etc..)

      September 1, 2011 at 4:22 pm |
    • The Real Tom Paine

      @ zealot: I guess I'm a lousy atheist, because I'm very much alive. We are an angry little monotheist, aren't we?

      September 1, 2011 at 4:25 pm |
  14. Reality

    Dear Rep. Ellison,

    In case you are "reading challenged":

    SAVING 1.5 BILLION LOST MUSLIMS:
    THERE NEVER WERE AND NEVER WILL BE ANY ANGELS I.E. NO GABRIEL, NO ISLAM AND THEREFORE NO MORE KORANIC-DRIVEN ACTS OF HORROR AND TERROR

    SAVING 2 BILLION LOST CHRISTIANS:
    THERE WERE NEVER ANY BODILY RESURRECTIONS AND THERE WILL NEVER BE ANY BODILY RESURRECTIONS I.E. NO EASTER, NO CHRISTIANITY

    SAVING 15.5 MILLION ORTHODOX FOLLOWERS OF JUDAISM:
    ABRAHAM AND MOSES PROBABLY NEVER EXISTED.

    Added details upon request.

    September 1, 2011 at 3:54 pm |
    • The Angel Gabriel

      I totally resent this! ::smite::

      September 1, 2011 at 4:02 pm |
    • hmm

      gay

      September 1, 2011 at 4:03 pm |
    • r-hope

      You sound very desparate....what's wrong?

      September 1, 2011 at 4:45 pm |
    • neednottoknow

      ridiculous... watch whom you are addressing this information to, not sure why you think he would be interested in your information.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:54 pm |
  15. Slewatha

    Read the comments and still say you believe that America is about religious freedom. Frauds.

    September 1, 2011 at 3:52 pm |
    • Anti Christian Taliban Schizophrenics

      Slewatha

      Read the comments and still say you believe that America is about religious freedom. Frauds.

      --------
      Wow you are not very smart are you?

      September 1, 2011 at 3:53 pm |
    • sam

      Yeah, 'cause a CNN forum is such a good representation of the whole country. LOL

      September 1, 2011 at 4:03 pm |
    • gager

      Slewatha, Islum sucks. Go back to your country and say that.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:04 pm |
    • Bill Wagner

      So true. America boasts about religious freedom, yet the comments on this page are full of hate speech against religion. Hypocrisy indeed.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:04 pm |
    • The Real Tom Paine

      @ Gager: Islum? Go back to your country and learn to spell, please.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:07 pm |
    • At least I'm not a fraud...

      ...I believe that America is about religious freedom.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:09 pm |
    • gager

      """Bill Wagner
      So true. America boasts about religious freedom, yet the comments on this page are full of hate speech against religion. Hypocrisy indeed."""
      Freedom of religion means there are no laws against any particular religion. It also offers freedom from religion. I am not forced to participate in religious nonsense. Islam. There is no edit button.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:10 pm |
    • The Real Tom Paine

      There is a quote by my namesake that says " I am not the Church of the Catholics, or the Anglican, or the Jews or the Muslims: I am the Church of my own mind." I have always been struck by how powerful and true that is, and all the babbling nonsense of religion is just that: babbling nonsense. I make my decisions based upon culture, experience, learning and reason: to help my society move forward, I leave behind those ideas that are outdated and unworkable. Would you go back to riding horses after driving a car? Of course not. Religion forces us to keep riding the horse, even symbolically, and it causes us not to grow. All religion does this.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:20 pm |
  16. Reality

    Dear Rep. Ellison,

    Just in case you need an update on the major religions:

    1. origin: http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=F20E1EFE35540C7A8CDDAA0894DA404482

    “New Torah For Modern Minds

    Abraham, the Jewish patriarch, probably never existed. Nor did Moses. The entire Exodus story as recounted in the Bible probably never occurred. The same is true of the tumbling of the walls of Jericho. And David, far from being the fearless king who built Jerusalem into a mighty capital, was more likely a provincial leader whose reputation was later magnified to provide a rallying point for a fledgling nation.

    Such startling propositions – the product of findings by archaeologists digging in Israel and its environs over the last 25 years – have gained wide acceptance among non-Orthodox rabbis. But there has been no attempt to disseminate these ideas or to discuss them with the laity – until now.

    The United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism, which represents the 1.5 million Conservative Jews in the United States, has just issued a new Torah and commentary, the first for Conservatives in more than 60 years. Called "Etz Hayim" ("Tree of Life" in Hebrew), it offers an interpretation that incorporates the latest findings from archaeology, philology, anthropology and the study of ancient cultures. To the editors who worked on the book, it represents one of the boldest efforts ever to introduce into the religious mainstream a view of the Bible as a human rather than divine docu-ment. “

    2. Jesus was an illiterate Jewish peasant/carpenter/simple preacher man who suffered from hallucinations (or “mythicizing” from P, M, M, L and J) and who has been characterized anywhere from the Messiah from Nazareth to a mythical character from mythical Nazareth to a ma-mzer from Nazareth (Professor Bruce Chilton, in his book Rabbi Jesus). An-alyses of Jesus’ life by many contemporary NT scholars (e.g. Professors Ludemann, Crossan, Borg and Fredriksen, ) via the NT and related doc-uments have concluded that only about 30% of Jesus' sayings and ways noted in the NT were authentic. The rest being embellishments (e.g. miracles)/hallucinations made/had by the NT authors to impress various Christian, Jewish and Pagan sects.

    The 30% of the NT that is "authentic Jesus" like everything in life was borrowed/plagiarized and/or improved from those who came before. In Jesus' case, it was the ways and sayings of the Babylonians, Greeks, Persians, Egyptians, Hitt-ites, Canaanites, OT, John the Baptizer and possibly the ways and sayings of traveling Greek Cynics.

    earlychristianwritings.com/theories.html

    For added "pizzazz", Catholic theologians divided god the singularity into three persons and invented atonement as an added guilt trip for the "pew people" to go along with this trinity of overseers. By doing so, they made god the padre into god the "filicider".

    Current RCC problems:

    Pedophiliac priests, an all-male, mostly white hierarchy, atonement theology and original sin!!!!

    3., Luther, Calvin, Joe Smith, Henry VIII, Wesley, Roger Williams, the Great “Babs” et al, founders of Christian-based religions or combination religions also suffered from the belief in/hallucinations of "pretty wingie thingie" visits and "prophecies" for profits analogous to the myths of Catholicism (resurrections, apparitions, ascensions and immacu-late co-nceptions).

    Current problems:
    Adulterous preachers, pedophiliac clerics, "propheteering/ profiteering" evangelicals and atonement theology,

    3. Mohammed was an illiterate, womanizing, lust and greed-driven, warmongering, hallucinating Arab, who also had embellishing/hallucinating/plagiarizing scribal biographers who not only added "angels" and flying chariots to the koran but also a militaristic agenda to support the plundering and looting of the lands of non-believers.

    This agenda continues as shown by the ma-ssacre in Mumbai, the as-sas-sinations of Bhutto and Theo Van Gogh, the conduct of the seven Muslim doctors in the UK, the 9/11 terrorists, the 24/7 Sunni suicide/roadside/market/mosque bombers, the 24/7 Shiite suicide/roadside/market/mosque bombers, the Islamic bombers of the trains in the UK and Spain, the Bali crazies, the Kenya crazies, the Pakistani “koranics”, the Palestine suicide bombers/rocketeers, the Lebanese nutcases, the Taliban nut jobs, the Ft. Hood follower of the koran, and the Filipino “koranics”.

    And who funds this muck and stench of terror? The warmongering, Islamic, Shiite terror and torture theocracy of Iran aka the Third Axis of Evil and also the Sunni "Wannabees" of Saudi Arabia.

    Current crises:

    The Sunni-Shiite blood feud and the warmongering, womanizing (11 wives), hallucinating founder.

    5. Hinduism (from an online Hindu site) – "Hinduism cannot be described as an organized religion. It is not founded by any individual. Hinduism is God centered and therefore one can call Hinduism as founded by God, because the answer to the question ‘Who is behind the eternal principles and who makes them work?’ will have to be ‘Cosmic power, Divine power, God’."

    The caste/laborer system, reincarnation and cow worship/reverence are problems when saying a fair and rational God founded Hinduism."

    Current crises:

    The caste system and cow worship/reverence.

    6. Buddhism- "Buddhism began in India about 500 years before the birth of Christ. The people living at that time had become disillusioned with certain beliefs of Hinduism including the caste system, which had grown extremely complex. The number of outcasts (those who did not belong to any particular caste) was continuing to grow."

    "However, in Buddhism, like so many other religions, fanciful stories arose concerning events in the life of the founder, Siddhartha Gautama (fifth century B.C.):"

    Archaeological discoveries have proved, beyond a doubt, his historical character, but apart from the legends we know very little about the circu-mstances of his life. e.g. Buddha by one legend was supposedly talking when he came out of his mother's womb.

    Bottom line: There are many good ways of living but be aware of the hallucinations, embellishments, lies, and myths surrounding the founders and foundations of said rules of life.

    Then, apply the Five F rule: "First Find the Flaws, then Fix the Foundations". And finally there will be religious peace and religious awareness in the world!!!!!

    September 1, 2011 at 3:49 pm |
    • neednottoknow

      Ok, thank you for spending the time. Though I would like to add a few things to balance out your article a bit. I think you have been too negative about religions. Yes, each religion has some flaws, but we are only human and we do make mistakes. Although I am not religious, I see religions as a positive element in today's society. In addition to the many problems you pointed out religion set rules for people to follow which is necessary for creating a safe and friendly living condition which is important to preserve culture and some not-so-new ideas such as parenting and childhood and ways we interact with each others. I don't believe many of the problems you pointed out is caused by religions, but rather extreme conditions such as poverty, luck of education, luck of moral teachings, living environment induced mental problems. We see things as problems because we know what right teaching are, and this rightness is been conditional to us completely/partial, directly/indirectly through religions. That is why religions are positive element in a civil society. What possibly went wrong is in desperation few people may use religion as a political tool to prosecute, alienate, dehumanize for their own purposes. Well, this is where education comes in if people have religious tolerance and the right teachings from religions many problems would be solved.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:26 pm |
    • Your Name Here

      Wow! Then according all your rambling logic, Communist China and the Soviet Union should be friggin' Utopia! Oh, wait, no, it seems they each killed several million of their own citizens in the name of "Freedom from Religion"! You may be educated and intelligent, but you're still an idiot!

      September 1, 2011 at 4:54 pm |
  17. TRH

    From one mythical belief to another,,,,so what?

    September 1, 2011 at 3:41 pm |
    • Bruce

      So you prefer pathos to mythos, or perhaps logos? Maybe ethos?

      Or perhaps you don't know what you mean by "myth"... Yeah. That sounds about right.

      September 1, 2011 at 3:49 pm |
    • gager

      Myth as in magical or mystical. It's all bs.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:02 pm |
    • Bruce

      So by "myth" you mean something other than "myth." Gotcha.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:04 pm |
  18. mikey

    No arguements for me, just one thing... If you don't know Him as Savior, you'll know Him soon as Judge...

    September 1, 2011 at 3:41 pm |
    • Mark

      Tell me again how this "God of love" thing works?

      September 1, 2011 at 3:47 pm |
    • gager

      Mark, it works the same as muslim is peace.

      September 1, 2011 at 3:51 pm |
    • My God's Bigger Than Yours

      Do you have any idea how silly that sounds?

      September 1, 2011 at 3:56 pm |
    • Truefax

      Uh huh, it must be nice to believe in a religion that lets you abdicate responsibility as long as you believe. I have a bride in Brooklyn that I can sell you for cheap. I like how you believe that your God was so impotent to forgive his own creation that you believe in the blood libel that is Christianity.
      Think for yourself.

      September 1, 2011 at 3:56 pm |
    • PandoraDoggl

      @Mark Suppose you were building a house big enough for everyone in the world to live in where there would be enough food, enough room, enough of everything for everyone. Even if you loved someone, would you let them move into the house if you knew they were unwilling to turn away from evil acts? Even if you loved them, would you let them come in if you knew they were going to bring into your house the very things you built the house to keep out – that they refused to acknowledge you as the master of the house? Because you also love the ones who have agreed to abide by your rules, for whom you have built this house, would you not seek to protect them?

      The only thing that makes the outside of that house hellish is the ones who live there.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:03 pm |
    • sam

      Wait for iiiiiiiit....

      brb hell in 3...2...1...

      September 1, 2011 at 4:04 pm |
    • Bill Wagner

      Explain how Jesus was God when Jesus prayed to God.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:07 pm |
    • Your Name Here

      Truefax; "I have a bride in Brooklyn that I will sell cheap". Your wife might have an issue with that!

      September 1, 2011 at 4:57 pm |
  19. BG

    Using a public school athletic field for muslim prayers... with women in the back.

    https://creepingsharia.wordpress.com/

    So tell me, all you muslim apologists and assorted neo-liberals – are christian politics still the only threat to this country?

    September 1, 2011 at 3:41 pm |
    • Anti Christian Taliban Schizophrenics

      BG

      Using a public school athletic field for muslim prayers... with women in the back.

      https://creepingsharia.wordpress.com/

      So tell me, all you muslim apologists and assorted neo-liberals – are christian politics still the only threat to this country?

      ---------
      All are threats,,,,,christians more of a threat because of the numbers. What the christians fail to realize is by pushing for their morals in the laws they are opening the door for other religions to push theirs....such as islam. These dum@ ss es don't think things through and think they will always be in power.

      September 1, 2011 at 3:44 pm |
    • Lawlz

      anti: "What the christians fail to realize is by pushing for their morals in the laws they are opening the door for other religions to push theirs....such as islam. These dum@ ss es don't think things through and think they will always be in power."

      You do realize that everyone pushes their own "morals" into every law, right? It doesn't matter if it's a Republican or a Democrat, a religious person or an atheist, they all want to permit or ban certain behaviors because of the behavior's "wrongness" and "harmfulness".

      And those are decidedly moral terms.

      I'm glad you thought this through so well.

      September 1, 2011 at 3:48 pm |
    • The Real Tom Paine

      I feel just as scared when Christians demand money for their little Christian madrassas: vouchers, anyone? only 6 out of 245 school in Indian that applied for vouchers were not religious schools, and the vast majority of those relitgious schools were Christian. Only by sheer volume do the Christians scare me more, and they are too well-established here.

      September 1, 2011 at 3:56 pm |
    • Truefax

      No they're not, but they are by far the biggest threat to civil society.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:00 pm |
    • Lawlz

      thereal: "I feel just as scared when Christians demand money for their little Christian madrassas: vouchers, anyone? only 6 out of 245 school in Indian that applied for vouchers were not religious schools, and the vast majority of those relitgious schools were Christian."

      It's cute when people give statistics without really giving them.

      Vouchers are intended to pay for private and charters schools with public money, from students that no longer wish to be in the public school system. Churches and religious organizations own and operate many schools. How many religious private schools exist versus non-religious ones?

      Can you give us numbers, or just empty talking points?

      September 1, 2011 at 4:01 pm |
    • Martin T

      @Lawlz, are you a teenager? You argue like a kid, smart kid, but with very little real world experience. Give yourself time, you'll grow into your intellect.. and Maybe you will change your views..

      September 1, 2011 at 4:02 pm |
    • Lawlz

      martin: "are you a teenager? You argue like a kid, smart kid, but with very little real world experience. Give yourself time, you'll grow into your intellect.. and Maybe you will change your views.."

      Brilliant rebuttal. Throw in a few ad hominems, never answer the question, and avoid substantiating all of your assertions.

      Kind of ironic that you disparagingly call others "kids", eh?

      September 1, 2011 at 4:04 pm |
    • Martin T

      "You do realize that everyone pushes their own "morals" into every law, right? It doesn't matter if it's a Republican or a Democrat, a religious person or an atheist, they all want to permit or ban certain behaviors because of the behavior's "wrongness" and "harmfulness"."

      Sooo, what is YOUR answer to the issue then? PLEASE SHARE other than just throwing out foolish retorts..

      September 1, 2011 at 4:05 pm |
    • BG

      @ ACTS & Paine

      Strange that we don't see the same degree of atheist outrage at what are clearly more 'activist' muslim events affecting schools and government at all levels.

      Can anyone say 'moderate atheists?' Or maybe the atheists need a scorecard, because it seems they can't tell the 'players' without one.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:05 pm |
    • Martin T

      @Lawlz, which is exactly WHY I asked if you were a kid, which I suspect highly. I am not condemning you or using an ad hom... I am asking for a response to hear more from you than just snippy retorts. YOU offer NOTHING to the discussion.. which is VERY childlike..

      September 1, 2011 at 4:07 pm |
    • Lawlz

      martin: "Sooo, what is YOUR answer to the issue then? PLEASE SHARE other than just throwing out foolish retorts.."

      Sorry, but the question was directed at you (or "anti"). Care to substantiate your assertion (without shooting yourself in the foot, that is)?

      The solution is to realize that the test for a law isn't whether it's "moral" (all laws are normative), or whether someone who is religious proposed it, it's whether or not the government has the power to pass the law in the first place. If it has to do with public welfare and preventing harms, it's justified on objective philosophical grounds that are *gasp* also moral.

      September 1, 2011 at 4:09 pm |
    • Lawlz

      martin: ""Sooo, what is YOUR answer to the issue then? PLEASE SHARE other than just throwing out foolish retorts..""

      Foolish retorts, eh? Deconstructing your arguments and pointing out their fallacies is merely a "foolish retort".

      That's cute 🙂

      September 1, 2011 at 4:10 pm |
  20. Skegeeace

    Catholicism seems to turn people off to Christianity in general- it's a warped version of the faith. Sad...

    September 1, 2011 at 3:40 pm |
    • Mark

      Really? What version of christianity isn't warped?

      September 1, 2011 at 3:48 pm |
    • The Real Tom Paine

      Based upon your comments, the only warped faith is yours.

      September 1, 2011 at 3:51 pm |
    • Bill Wagner

      Really? What version of christianity isn't warped? It's all based on a book that even the scholars of which agree it's authenticity can not be proven. Watch Bart Ehrman on youtube

      September 1, 2011 at 4:10 pm |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.