home
RSS
Lawyer: Iranian Supreme Leader to weigh in on pastor’s execution
October 10th, 2011
11:35 AM ET

Lawyer: Iranian Supreme Leader to weigh in on pastor’s execution

By Dan Merica, CNN

Washington (CNN) –-  The possible hanging of an Iranian pastor, who may face execution for refusing to recant his Christian beliefs, reached the highest levels of the Iranian government over the weekend with Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei being asked for his opinion on the possible death sentence.

Mohammad Dadkhah, attorney for Pastor Youcef Nadarkhani, told CNN that Nadarkhani was still alive and that the court has asked the highest religious leader in Iran for his input. Though Khamenei has the ultimate authority in Iranian affairs, the move is unusual for a case that was supposed to be decided Monday.

Nadarkhani, the leader of a network of house churches in Iran, was first convicted of apostasy in November 2010, a charge he subsequently appealed all the way to the Iranian Supreme Court. In an appeals trial last month at a lower court in Gilan province, Nadarkhani refused to recant his beliefs.

After the trial, however, reports by the semi-official Fars News Agency on September 30 indicated that the charges against Nadarkhani have since changed and the pastor is now charged with rape and extortion. "This issue has nothing to do with his abandoning his religion," reported Fars.

"He is a Zionist and has committed security-related crimes," Gholomali Rezvanii said in the Fars News report. Renvanii is the deputy governor of Gilan province, where Nadarkhani was tried and convicted.

In a 2010 Iranian Supreme Court brief obtained by CNN, the charge of apostasy is the only charge listed.

"He [Nadarkhani] has stated that he is a Christian and no longer Muslim," states the brief.

"During many sessions in court with the presence of his attorney and a judge, he has been sentenced to execution by hanging according to article 8 of Tahrir – olvasileh."

The case has drawn international attention, with governments from around the world, including the United States, Britain and France, issuing statements on the fate of the pastor.

Nadarkhani "has done nothing more than maintain his devout faith, which is a universal right for people," a White House spokesman said in a statement. "That the Iranian authorities would try to force him to renounce that faith violates the religious values they claim to defend, crosses all bounds of decency and breaches Iran's own international obligations."

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Christianity • Interfaith issues • Iran

soundoff (955 Responses)
  1. Godfrey

    Let's not forget that when Christians had the power to kill people who wouldn't convert, they did so by the tens of thousands.

    Religion itself is the problem. It has no place in the modern world.

    October 11, 2011 at 1:19 am |
    • Mike

      And yet another person saying reilgion has no place in the modern world there is nothing wrong with reilgion in the modern world it helps to bring meaning to people lives the only problem is when people use it to further their own goals. As it people have done with anything and everything inculdeing people who claim to not belvie in reilgion but follow the rest of the group to brash reilgion in a uniformed manner.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:27 am |
    • Lindsey

      as a christian myself, I understand your opinion. I do not agree but I do understand what you are saying, it does seem as if our world today that it is difficult to have faith. That is why is it equally important to have it, His is what helps millions of people get through the day, and their lives in a joyful manner. Mean while you sit at your computer comfortably telling your opinion about religion, this pastor and his family is facing death for thier faith and opinion, but you are safe from persecution and while they may pay the ultimate price for theirs.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:31 am |
    • Godfrey

      Lindsey: I'm not saying its difficult to have "faith" in today's world. I'm saying that, with the advances of the last few hundred years, it is sad that the concept of "faith" exists at all.

      With most of the religious hocus-pocus of the last two thousand years long since explained and refuted (a 6000-year-old Earth, a Great Flood, talking donkeys and all the other nonsense), it's sad that we as a species still cling find it necessary to cling to our primitive notions of gods and demons.

      We should be past this silliness by now.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:42 am |
  2. LUCY

    Muslims burn churches in every Muslim country and western Christians keep giving Billions to Muslims and even allow Muslims to move into the west and US, Muslims have no mercy or kind hearts for others who don't share their religion, COPTS CHRISTIANS HAVE LIVED IN EGPYT 600 YEARS BEFORE MUSLIMS AND STILL THEY ARE DENIED ALL HUMAN RIGHTS, EVEN TODAY IN THE 21 CENTURY, I PRAY FOR THESE PASTOR AND HIS WIFE AND TWO CHILDREN.

    there is also a poor Christian women about to be killed in pakistan for her faith? sorry to say this but Muslims are godless when they killing their own poor citizens for no other reason they they either converted to another religion of don't follow Islam, PLEASE MUSLIMS STOP THE HATE AND MURDER FOR YOUR RELIGION, BE HUMAN,

    October 11, 2011 at 1:15 am |
  3. moneypostyeah

    This really has nothing to do with religion. It is the Iranian government provoking the West. To be honest, like in a lot of Middle Eastern countries, the governments are free to slaughter their own people. The West really doesn't care. As long as the oil is flowing, governments in the East can kill, torture and do whatever they want. Is anything going to happen if this man is executed. No, not at all. Iran has been killing and imprisoning people of all faiths since the revolution. Nothing will change until the people of the Middle East rise up and stamp out these rulers. It is not likely to happen. Russian, China and America enjoy the profit of weapons sales to the Middle East. It is not in their interest to promote peace. The machine continues to operate as usual. Cheers!

    October 11, 2011 at 1:13 am |
    • Mike-Bell

      That is a typical conclusion of the least common denominator of humanity.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:15 am |
    • LMW

      ALL things rise and fall.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:28 am |
    • b2bliving

      My friend please do not forget that you too are beneficiary of US policy...a policy to better the life of its people...US is not robbing the middle east...US cannot keep policing the world..look where it got us....bankrupt....you will realize when you feel the pinch...

      October 11, 2011 at 1:50 am |
    • moneypostyeah

      It just happens that the Iranian government will probably not fall in time to save the life of the pastor. Then again, the Iranians may set him free and say that it is blessing from Allah and a gift to the West. They let the hikers go. This may be a stunt to gain sympathy too. You never know how things are going to turn out when dealing with the Iranian government. BTW, I'm proud to be the least common denominator of humanity.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:51 am |
    • moneypostyeah

      BTW, I'm a muslim and live in the Middle East. I'm not evil. I'm just like you. I take religion with a grain of salt. I go to the Mosque twice a year. I don't pray 5 times a day. I work and pay taxes. You can whorship the Flying Spagetti Monster for all I care. I don't hold any ill will towards anyone. I don't impose my beliefs on anyone. I just want to live comfortably and provide for my family. I have found that most human being around the world want the same thing. Employment, education, safety and security. I believe in human rights. I don't oppress women. My wife doesn't cover. She wears jeans and t-shirts like most folks. The majority of Muslims are good, honest and normal people.

      October 11, 2011 at 2:00 am |
  4. LUCY

    God bless and protect this innocent man from death by the hands of evil Muslims who are willing to shed the blood of a father of two children and husband, Muslims who murderer innocent people for their GOD WILL BURN IN HELL..

    October 11, 2011 at 1:10 am |
    • Mike-Bell

      His family is at risk of death also.
      So not only is he willing to die for his family, his family is also will or realizes that they don't want to be in this world without him.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:13 am |
    • Godfrey

      Islam is a symptom... but so is Christianity.

      It's the disease–religion–that must be cured.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:23 am |
    • Mike

      When u post things like Muslims are evil all you is get the reilgion hateing yahoos to come out the wood work. Muslims are not evil nethier are crhistens or any major religion it when people use it for their own goals that is when evil occurs. Iran gov enjoys anything that will sure make the west mad so condeming a good man to death for a very old rule that has nothing to do with the modern world is an evil act they enjoy to do. Most reilgious people on ethier side do not hate each other but try to work together so do not claim one side is evil all it does is to get people to come out and bash reilgion as a whole do not fruter the hate but further understanding and love

      October 11, 2011 at 1:34 am |
    • Godfrey

      Mike: you have an interesting notion there, that "evil" only comes about when people
      use religion "for their own goals".

      The real problem, I'm afraid, is that religion gives people permission to stop thinking for themselves: permission to ignore what they know to be right and moral.

      That's when you get beheadings, bombings and in the case of Chrisitanity, stonings and witch-burnings.

      Religion is a pox on us all.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:46 am |
    • Mike

      Well Gofrey i see where you coming from yea there a bunch of people who follow blindly when it comes to reilgilon and make the rest of us look bad ive met many in my life who are like that my view on things always been God gave us a mind to think for ourselves and we should think about our actions before following the crowd. If people use their mind with things concerning reilgilon then the world would be better off its not reilgion that a pox on all its idioits

      October 11, 2011 at 2:47 am |
  5. Jibreel

    I am a Muslim. I want to say I respect Christians in the same way you guys respect the Jews. Shariah dictates muslims and non muslims live almost equally (Muslims and non Muslims have to pay Jizyah, BTW).

    This man was not a just a Christian however, he was an apostate. Islam has the same punishment for Apostates as Christianity. Please be civil and avoid hipocracy.

    October 11, 2011 at 1:09 am |
    • Mike-Bell

      Jibreel – B.S.
      If you knew Christianity, you would know better.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:18 am |
    • Lady

      Islam is deadly. If you are a devout Muslim you cannot deny this. The Qur'an states to be violent towards Christians.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:20 am |
    • LUCY

      So you as a Muslims supporting killing a former Muslim because he chose another religion ? And then you wonder why more people are speaking out against Muslims like you, you come across like a nice person and then you shock me when you say its ok to kill him, its Islamic law, I know Mohammed said anyone who changes his 'her religion kill them.

      I was hoping that Muslims in the 21 century would be more human today then follow law to murder innocent man for his faith only, shame on you, and any religion that supports such a thing in this day and age,

      October 11, 2011 at 1:22 am |
    • Vladimir

      CHRISTIANS DO NOT MURDER THOSE WHO ABANDON THE CHRISTIAN FAITH!!!!!!

      October 11, 2011 at 1:25 am |
    • waterviewdoc

      So let's see.....excommunication versus hanging. Which would you chose? Just practice this crap in your part of the world and stop preaching about the peaceful religion of Islam.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:26 am |
    • thoughtful

      The US government does not execute Christians who abandoned their Christian faith for Islam or any other religion.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:26 am |
    • b2bliving

      These are not medieval times....unfortunately many a muslims even the most educated ones subscribe to those times....

      October 11, 2011 at 1:27 am |
    • Mike

      Frist off Vladmir your an idioit, ever heard of the the Spanish inquisition? Christens have killed former Christens for converting though it does not happen today like it use to please look at a history book before posting something in all caps you make the rest of us look bad. Lady actually the Quran talks about respecting other people of the Book i.e. CHristans and Jews, i do not recall it saying to out and kill them you might be mistaken by a mis qouta or a differnt book there are other reilgous books used by Islam that are not part of the Quran where things get distorted because people think it all the same like women wearing full body covering is not a reilgious thing but a cultural thing.

      Now Jibreel the man may be consider an apostate by Islam and by going by the Quran you would be right and it does say someone to be killed but really in the world we live in today does such a thing still need to be practriced and ask yourself if this was not Iran or if it was not something that would clearly anger the west would they still do it in Iran. Islam like any other reilgion has changed over the years and some things in most places its pracitec do not all have the same laws or enforce all the same laws and this is one of the things in a modern world and in a world that many people do not understand Islam should be let go. You do not get people on your side by killing other people Christans learned this after the Medevial period.

      October 11, 2011 at 3:21 am |
  6. Jesus

    Ok fine. I Jesus now declare religion will end the world. Heck, my number one prophet Harold camping says so in a couple of weeks. Cool. A new experience for us all. I guess US politics is now solely focused on religion. So stupid ya'all. We win now that we got stupid politicians to deal on our religious terms.

    October 11, 2011 at 1:06 am |
    • Mike-Bell

      The end of the world is relative to the individual.
      The end of the planet should really be of no concern to those that die today or before the actual end to this planet. Each of us should live our lives like today is out last. Now how they live it may depend upon their interpretation of the purpose of living.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:10 am |
    • Vanquier

      Whoever is posting to be Jesus is committing blasphemy.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:13 am |
    • Mike-Bell

      Vanquier – Do you not realize how many Latin American people have the name of Jesus?
      If anything it is taking his name in vain.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:16 am |
    • HotAirAce

      Only if they are a member of your cult, otherwise your rules do not apply.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:18 am |
  7. SpartySam

    Kokojj–> This is Christianity. Wherever you find Christianity this story is repeated every day. Look at what happens in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Iraqis and Afghans who have done nothing to Christians are "hitted" by the weapons of the Christian Armies of foreign countries because they have a right build a mosque. Oh by the way kokojj your English stinks.

    October 11, 2011 at 1:05 am |
    • b2bliving

      If you truly an American or living in one of the western countries you would not say such a thing...unless of course you deliberately choose to overlook the facts....When in US and in western countries people have the maximum freedom to practice their religion, build a mosque at ground zero...you think they would go to other countries to persecute them ? Amazing...

      For your information...US went there to liberate them from their own tyrannical governments...but US was too naive to think that once the dictators were overthrown things will simply fall into place and all will be peaceful...US too has sacrificed lives as well as their global standing .....be grateful that you are not living in one of those countries...

      October 11, 2011 at 1:21 am |
  8. b2bliving

    Have the muslims & their leaders in this country have raised their voices in support of this pastor ?

    October 11, 2011 at 12:59 am |
    • Michelle

      Or are they too afraid?

      October 11, 2011 at 1:02 am |
    • Mike-Bell

      They don't dare. If they do they would be considered apostate and an infidel. Then lose there station in the governance, be labeled an infidel, and potentially executed.
      All methods of coercion; like those of Satan.
      Christianity 'invites' people to come to Christ.
      Islam intimidates people to be 'subject' to Allah; or actually to their elite that claim to be their caretakers or minders on behalf of Allah.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:07 am |
    • Nate

      no

      October 11, 2011 at 1:15 am |
    • LUCY

      of course not, not one Muslims in America has spoken out, Most Muslims are not honest enough to admit they support killing anyone who leaves Islam, ask Muslims and see what they tell you , Mohammed their prophet told Muslims to kill any Muslims who leaves Islam, its a religion whose founder killed to created an army of robots willing to kill for him.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:28 am |
  9. Christopher Fowler

    This is only the start. Christ warned us of these last days in end times, not saying I know the time and date of his return, but if you take a good look at the world in where we all stand...well you pretty much know yourself. God bless this brother of mine who gives his life to the christ Jesus. You will be welcomed into His kingdom with open arms of life.

    October 11, 2011 at 12:58 am |
    • tree beast

      your words touched my heart!

      October 11, 2011 at 1:04 am |
    • Michelle

      Yes, God Bless this pastor and his family and friends.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:05 am |
    • Credenza

      It is wonderful to see someone bearing witness to Christianity in a deep and sincere way. God Bless you Christopher and may God hold this brave young man, Pastor Youcef, in the palm of His hand.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:12 am |
    • Lindsey

      ahh yes! I've read these verses about the end of times several times and this reminded me of them. I'm so glad that this world we live in today is only temporary. Christopher thank you for what you said, and I really appreciate it. I keep this pastor and his family in my prayers.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:25 am |
  10. Jimbo

    If this guy is executed, my sympathy for Islam will fade, and I can no longer criticize people using the word "evil" to describe the government of Iran.

    October 11, 2011 at 12:57 am |
    • Mike-Bell

      The governance of Iran is Islam.
      Just because it uses democracy to choose it's local leaders does not equate to freedom or personal liberty.
      In no way would you see them electing someone not a Muslim.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:00 am |
  11. amina

    Yes indeed. All the Muslim countries are oppressive toward Christianity. Christianity is becoming extenct in Middle East because of the prejudice that exists in Iran, Turkey, Egypt, Iraq, etc. Muslims are welcomed in U.S. and Europe, yet indigenous Christians in Muslim countires are brutalized and chased out of their soil. Wake up world, help these vulnrable minority Christians. But of course, the media even CNN paints a peaceful picture of Islam and Muslim people and barely covers atrocities committed against Christians. I'm actually surprised to see this story up. Islam claims to have respect for Jesus Christ and the Christian tradition, I cannot imagine if it had none at all. Stupid!!!!!!!!!

    October 11, 2011 at 12:56 am |
    • Credenza

      I wish Muslims would stop their irritating habit of insisting they are a religion of peace. There are Christians in every Muslim country being murdered; burnt alive; attacked during prayers and church services.

      These attackers are NOT terrorists, they are ordinary everyday Muslims who delight in brutality. Shame on Islam.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:05 am |
    • ghost

      I am so greatful that there are people like you who have the courage to speak up and educate our community!!! I agree with your statement and support it in prayers that God will put leaders in this country and others to protect our Christian beliefs and right to liberty.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:21 am |
  12. Jesus

    All US evangelicals must prove their beliefs. Go yonder with olive branch and save ye brethren. Lest ye faith is lost. Spare thy fellow abrahmic brothers, for they are innocents misled by false prophets. Drop thy arms, help, and forgive.

    October 11, 2011 at 12:55 am |
    • ghost

      You got to be kidding me!!! The people who do such horrible acts of injustice to other human beigns are not innocent. They are not children to be compared to. My brother!! You are mistaken.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:27 am |
  13. Eric

    In Islam, the punishment for leaving the faith, is death, plain and simple: it is brutal, it is draconian but that is the prescription straight from the religion. Now, that religious stipulation was put in place at that time to ensure the survival of a budding religion, and predates all modern civilized value systems.
    Folks make a valid point as to why the interpretation should be maintained so, today, and what if the same prescription is given to those leaving other religions and convert to Islam. Very valid points and those of the Islamic faith should be told they can't have it both ways.

    October 11, 2011 at 12:53 am |
    • HotAirAce

      I wonder what the christian's reaction would have been if this guy had converted to judaism?

      October 11, 2011 at 12:55 am |
    • Mike-Bell

      HotAirAce – In the U.S.A. that is not unheard of. But honor killings are not permitted in the U.S.A. either.

      October 11, 2011 at 12:57 am |
    • Credenza

      @HotAirAce – Whatever the post you ALWAYS bring it down to your own anti-semitism. Why do you feel the need to do that?
      This post is about a brave young man of conviction who will not sell his soul for a mess of potage. Please stick to the current thread.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:16 am |
    • HotAirAce

      Credenza, there you go again, failing to read for comprehension and jumping to conclusions. I mentioned judaism only because it is supposed to be the other world religion. But, I do suspect that if the man facing death for converting to christianity had converted to judaism, christians would be silent.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:23 am |
  14. Emelia

    @Dont be that guy
    Something I forgot to mention, the story you're thinking of ("The Ra.pe of Persephone") isn't usually referred to as a 'resurrection' story, though I see how you came to that conclusion. Dionysus' name means "born twice", literally, and is the only god from the stories that has explicitly been able to resurrect.
    @Mennoknight
    1. To the ancients, it was incredibly real.
    2. The Romans only rewrote existing stories to fit their agenda. The Greeks actually wrote it.

    October 11, 2011 at 12:52 am |
  15. JFuentes

    This is the first time I have ever posted on an article on CNN. I usually read the readers' comments on the articles concerning religion because it is interesting to see the reactions that people have. It is really sad to see the relentless bickering and the closed minded arguments on both sides. Personally, I was raised in a pretty Atheistic home and I became a Christian as a teenager. I have experienced my fair share of religious zealots and honestly, I find them to be disgusting. Therefore, for the majority of Christians that write on these articles, I become ashamed of my affiliation with you. You treat the people on these posts with little-to-no courtesy or respect and yet you expect them to blunder their way into your understanding. As for the other side of the fence, they often have more open and logical arguments than you do and somehow, you continue to treat them as if they are children. Nothing in the Bible supports this sort of slander and opinionated bigotry. They will know us by our love. That starts with how you respect your fellow man. Don't expect to make any sort of impact if the first words out of your mouth are hateful.

    As for the actual article, I am encouraged by the bold faith of this pastor and I do pray for him just as I pray for their nation and ours.

    October 11, 2011 at 12:47 am |
    • Michelle

      I agree with you and also know that if our hearts feel any kind of hatred for those who do not know Christ, we should allow freedom of discussion and introduce God as Our savior – no matter where we are from. He is univeral and an introduction to Him might bring true meaning to the lives of many who suffer under Iranian rule.

      October 11, 2011 at 12:59 am |
    • GPB

      JFuentes:
      The first intelligent, well-composed post on CNN I have seen. Thanx.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:00 am |
    • Lindsey

      I agree with you, as a christian myself we should be supporting this pastor who is facing religious persecution. He didn't give up his faith even when it means death, this is a truely sad story about how Iran rules things and denies people the basic natural rights. I really hope and pray that Jesus will come out of this, and save this man. Nobody should have to die for what they believe in.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:03 am |
    • Godfrey

      Interesting personal story. What convinced you to suddenly start worshiping the bloodthirsty war god of the ancient Hebrew nomads?

      Why not worship Mithra, for example?

      October 11, 2011 at 1:29 am |
    • JFuentes

      Godfrey,

      I barely gave any personal story. I wrote briefly about my upbringing to give support to my ability to understand both sides of the argument. I am going to ignore your question because of your obvious lack of civility.

      October 11, 2011 at 9:24 am |
    • Godfrey

      I said "interesting" personal story, not "remarkably complete" personal story.

      What's interesting about it, to me, is how someone can grow up without the mindf%&K and choose to buy into it later. You obviously chose the religion that was most in evidence (not, for instance, Mithraism) so I was wondering how that decision came about. It's rare that someone who grows up without the mindf%&k starts believing in something as absurd as Christianity. Just wondering what your motivation was.

      A girl?

      October 11, 2011 at 1:10 pm |
  16. Mike-Bell

    How does this prove that Islam is a religion of peace and tolerance?

    October 11, 2011 at 12:45 am |
    • Christopher Fowler

      Well said, That's a good point to be showed here.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:00 am |
    • Lady

      Mohammed was not a peaceful guy. If you research Islam you'll see its not a peaceful religion. Its deadly. This story breaks my heart.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:07 am |
    • Godfrey

      Lady: if you research any of the Abrahamic religions, you'll find that they are based on murder, blood and death.

      Christianity is among the sickest, of course, since it invented Hell (permanent torture, for eternity–what sick mind came up with that?)

      Religion is a poignant illustration of the depths of human depravity.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:34 am |
  17. Maria B.

    God is able to deliver him, his fate is only in Gods hands. This Pastor knows that. If God decides not to deliver him, his blood will call before God for justice. Then, Iran will tremble. Egypt learned that long time ago, but are about to be reminded again.

    October 11, 2011 at 12:44 am |
    • Mike-Bell

      This may be another 'Turn the Other Cheek' moment to make it blatantly obvious to the world what the true origin of Islam is.
      I always turn the other cheek so that there is no doubt about the offender's intentions. Then all bets are off on a third strike.
      Even in Old Testament times there was opportunity given to offenders to repent of their offense before wrath was unleashed upon them. Mosses communicated to Pharaoh opportunities to end his offense and then it was God's time to act.
      This pastor knows that he and his family may become the necessary sacrificial lambs before the wrath of God is poured out.

      October 11, 2011 at 12:55 am |
  18. SonOfAbe

    You can't see the wind, but you can see and feel the effects of the wind! The Christian faith is not blind faith in a make believe object. When you sit down in a chair, it usually holds you up. This is the effect of you having faith in the chair to hold you up. Likewise, when you realize you cannot reach God or remove sin/imperfection from your life, your only hope is to let God do it. "Turn from your sin and be baptized, every one of you, in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins. And you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit." The gift of the Holy Spirit is the "wind" that blows in the hearts of every person who puts their faith in Jesus Christ. The power of the Holy Spirit enables a person to live a life that is pleasing to God – a life free from the bondage of sin (this is the result/effect of faith in Christ). Tried Jesus? – you will not be disappointed.

    October 11, 2011 at 12:44 am |
    • Credenza

      You might like to look up The Divine Mercy. It's pretty wonderful.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:25 am |
  19. Mark G.

    If they can justify killing someone for having a different fatth than they are saying that it is OK for other countries to kill Muslims because they are not Christians.

    October 11, 2011 at 12:43 am |
    • ghost

      I totally agree dude! It's a shame that humans stoop that low 😦

      October 11, 2011 at 1:43 am |
  20. kokojj

    This is Islam. Wherever you find Islam this story is repeated every day . look to what happens in Egypt , the coptic christiens who are the original owner of the country are hitted by the weapons of the army of their country because they protest to have a right to build a church.

    October 11, 2011 at 12:42 am |
    • SpartySam

      Your English stinks.

      October 11, 2011 at 1:07 am |
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
Advertisement
About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.