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My Take: Are evangelicals dangerous?
Many evangelicals want to ban abortion, but does that mean they want theocracy?
October 15th, 2011
10:00 PM ET

My Take: Are evangelicals dangerous?

Editor's Note: R. Albert Mohler, Jr., is president of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, the flagship school of the Southern Baptist Convention and one of the largest seminaries in the world.

By R. Albert Mohler, Jr., Special to CNN

Here we go again.

Every four years, with every new presidential election cycle, public voices sound the alarm that the evangelicals are back. What is so scary about America’s evangelical Christians?

Just a few years ago, author Kevin Phillips told intellectual elites to run for cover, claiming that well-organized evangelicals were attempting to turn America into a theocratic state. In “American Theocracy,” Phillips warned of the growing influence of Bible-believing, born-again, theologically conservative voters who were determined to create a theocracy.

Writer Michelle Goldberg, meanwhile, has warned of a new Christian nationalism, based in “dominion theology.” Chris Hedges topped that by calling conservative Christians “American fascists.”

And so-called New Atheists like Richard Dawkins and Sam Harris claim that conservative Christians are nothing less than a threat to democracy. They prescribe atheism and secularism as the antidotes.

This presidential cycle, the alarms have started earlier than usual. Ryan Lizza, profiling Rep. Michele Bachmann for The New Yorker, informed his readers that “Bachmann belongs to a generation of Christian conservatives whose views have been shaped by institutions, tracts, and leaders not commonly known to secular Americans, or even to most Christians.”

Change just a few strategic words and the same would be true of Barack Obama or any other presidential candidate. Every candidate is shaped by influences not known to all and by institutions that other Americans might find strange.

What stories like this really show is that the secular elites assume that their own institutions and leaders are normative.

The New Yorker accused Bachmann of being concerned with developing a Christian worldview, ignoring the fact that every thinking person operates out of some kind of worldview. The article treated statements about wifely submission to husbands and Christian influence in art as bizarre and bellicose.

When Rick Perry questioned the theory of evolution, Dawkins launched into full-on apoplexy, wondering aloud how anyone who questions evolution could be considered intelligent, even as polls indicate that a majority of Americans question evolution.

Bill Keller, then executive editor of The New York Times, topped all the rest by seeming to suggest that conservative Christians should be compared to those who believe in space aliens. He complained that “when it comes to the religious beliefs of our would-be presidents, we are a little squeamish about probing too aggressively.”

Really? Earlier this month, comedian Penn Jillette - a well–known atheist - wrote a very serious op-ed complaining of the political influence of “bugnut Christians,” in the pages of The Los Angeles Times, no less. Detect a pattern here?

By now, this is probably being read as a complaint against the secular elites and prominent voices in the mainstream media. It’s not.

If evangelicals intend to engage public issues and cultural concerns, we have to be ready for the scrutiny and discomfort that comes with disagreement over matters of importance. We have to risk being misunderstood - and even misrepresented - if we intend to say anything worth hearing.

Are evangelicals dangerous? Well, certainly not in the sense that more secular voices warn. The vast majority of evangelicals are not attempting to create a theocracy, or to oppose democracy.

To the contrary, evangelicals are dangerous to the secularist vision of this nation and its future precisely because we are committed to participatory democracy.

As Christians committed to the Bible, evangelicals have learned to advocate on behalf of the unborn, believing that every single human being, at every stage of development, is made in God’s image.

Evangelicals worry about the fate of marriage and the family, believing that the pattern for human relatedness set out in Scripture will lead to the greatest human flourishing.

We are deeply concerned about a host of moral and cultural issues, from how to address poverty to how to be good stewards of the earth, and on some of these there is a fairly high degree of disagreement even among us.

Above all, evangelicals are those who believe that Jesus Christ is Lord and are most concerned about telling others about Jesus. Most of America’s evangelical Christians are busy raising their children, working to support their families and investing energy in their local churches.

But over recent decades, evangelical Christians have learned that the gospel has implications for every dimension of life, including our political responsibility.

We’re dangerous only to those who want more secular voices to have a virtual monopoly in public life.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of R. Albert Mohler, Jr.

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Christianity • Opinion • Politics

soundoff (5,318 Responses)
  1. Diane

    I was a born-again Christian at age 18. But I looked hard at my born-again community and realized that few of them questioned ANYTHING that the particular leader of the day (and not necessarily the bible) told them to believe or how to live their lives. Multiply that by a nation and you have one dangerous group of voters. Your concern of secular voices having a majority is disingenuous, since the secular usually believe everyone has a right to their own beliefs, as long as they're not forced on others.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:08 am |
    • Colin

      congratulations on escaping.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:13 am |
    • W.G.

      To Diane – This is why Real Christians insist that you study what the Bible says and not man . Nowhere in the N.Testament
      Did Jesus say that you would be prosperous if you followed Him . Most of the Apostles died horrible deaths . He siad you would be forgiven of your sins . It does´nt say anything about gold dust or jewels falling out of your hair . There are a lot of people out there who falsley read into the Bible what they want to hear and there are a lot of people ( Atheist) who comment on the beliefs of Christians but have never Opened a Bible !

      October 16, 2011 at 9:20 am |
    • TruthPrevails

      First of all I concur with Colin (as usual)

      Second to WG: what you have wrong is thinking that most Atheists have never opened a bible. In reality most have opened it and read it more thoroughly than most christians have. Having read it is the base in so many cases for not believing in it. The problem with christians is that everyone has their own take on what the bible means. We simply do away with that and seek our answers based on evidence, reason and logic and the bible provides none of that. We are rational minded people seeking to ensure the truth and facts are known and lived by. We take full responsibility for our actions and when faced with a question we don't have an answer to, we do not pray for the answer, we research it and if the research is not conclusive, we simply state we don't know instead of saying 'it must be gods will'.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:48 am |
  2. Dan

    I noticed that US has true Americans (hardworking, interlligent, educated, progressing, and strong critical thinkers), and Republicans (...hhhmmm, I better not say the characteristics). Republicans put us in two wars that cost us 17 billion per month and deep debt while outsourcing all the jobs overseas. Put it simply, Republicans are like cancer in this country; no critical thinking and reckless. If they truly into "protecting Americans", then why don't they fight to provide Americans with simple basic need (i.e. medical care) and protect US citizens from disease not just from...uuhhh.. from backwarded terrorists.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:08 am |
  3. Dialogos

    To all the uneducated liberal BIGOTS. It's the Christian belief system that built our democracy. Take Christ away and there is NO WESTERN WORLD with the freedom's the you secular athiests take for granted.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:07 am |
    • jemzinthekop

      This is not true in any way.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:09 am |
    • LOL

      Freedoms isn't a possessive.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:09 am |
    • matilda61

      You are sadly mistaken. Also, name-calling just makes you look desperate.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:24 am |
    • TruthPrevails

      just another foolish sheeple who has been brainwashed and left without the ability to seek education outside of the book of fairy tales...sad existence

      October 16, 2011 at 10:03 am |
    • NoStupidity

      Christ is completely taken away from the western world. Have you heard of secularism. Do you know the percentage of christians to athiests in countries like Sweden, Norway, and France? Do you live in a cave?

      October 16, 2011 at 1:58 pm |
  4. ReggieMoto

    "What is so scary about America’s evangelical Christians?"

    Why, nothing. What is so scary about evangelistic Muslims and Sharia law?

    "Athiest are so insecure in their own faith that they have to crittize ours."

    Ha-ha! We have no faith...what are you talking about? There's no insecurity, unlike you who need the warmth and comfort of a security blanket called "religion" or "faith". You screwballs can't accept that there's nothing beyond your current miserable existence except its end. That's practically the very definition of insecurity.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:06 am |
    • LOL

      it's something i like to refer to as the "France Defense". ever diss a frenchman? the claim you're doing it out of jealousy. same thing.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:08 am |
    • Greg

      "We have no faith?"

      This is the biggest lie atheists believe. Of course you believe something: you believe there is no God. This is something n person can prove, just as the opposite is also true.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:21 am |
    • W.G.

      to reggie motto – Sure you do why are you people constantly attack Christians for their beliefs ?? If atheism was´nt a religion
      you would´nt be on here promoting it and knocking Real Christianity that says That you should´nt kill ,steal , lie ....
      and if you do and are sorry about it we´ve got the solution .

      October 16, 2011 at 9:25 am |
    • NoStupidity

      Greg, you can think you can't proof that there is no God, but can you proof that there is no flying banana orbiting the earth and giving orders to Obama? Or maybe you can proof that the goat i saw yesterday on top of the CN Tower asking that i worship her wasn't really there.
      If you believe in something you need to prove it. So the burden in proving that there is a god lies on the shoulders of those who believe he exists, you don't come ask me, an athiest, to proof he doesn't exist. Just like i won't come ask you to proof that the flying banana doesn't exist, since you don't believe in it!

      October 16, 2011 at 2:06 pm |
  5. Frank

    This is and always has been an extremely fine line. Freedom of Religion is great for those who need that guidance in life. History has proven over the years that there are Religious leaders who prey on the weak and lead them into a dangerous and evil place. The God that I know and who everyone thinks they know, if walked this earth today would shame and cast down probably 99% of all Religious leaders as they have simply gotten the whole premise of "Christianity" all wrong. Using their position to spew their venom and hate. God is Love. Clearly back to our founding fathers THEY saw a need to separate Church and State. Right winged conservative Christians today want everyone in the world to share their views, beliefs and ways. They just don't get that the world is made up of many many different people and beliefs. If Jesus walked the face of the earth today, I believe he would still be either walking in bare feet, or in simple sandals and clothing. spreading the word of Love. Not jetting around the country trying to Pay off Politicians and other government officials to gain power based on their Religious agenda's. Yes, times have changed, and so now. If Religious leaders wish to throw their hats into the political arena, TAX THE CHURCHES !!!

    October 16, 2011 at 9:06 am |
  6. Sherri

    Be afraid, be very, very afraid! The rhetoric, the inciting to frenzies, the evoking of fire and brimstone serve one purpose: terror. If evangelicals can plant the seeds of terror, then they can control the masses. Why? Because then they can play a familiar role: Savior. The ones who will keep the rest of us from harm,and if we only follow these few simple rules, we'll be safe too. Oh, and by the way, just a few more rules- they're small, really. Keep females in the home, uneducated and trapped by a pregnancy every year, while the female children are doomed to the same fate as the mother. Evangelicals speak to paint non evangelicals as less than, as inferior. Gee, now that's real charity and the epitome of humble, is it not? Using faith as a weapon to brandish against others to beat them to your belief does not bring peace and harmony, but rather the opposite. I think history proves out that evangelicals have been and are still today, dangerous.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:06 am |
  7. Al Russell

    I was reading this article seriously until I started seeing terms like "secular elitist." These terms are propaganda buzz words that mean nothing, but are used to inspire a negative reaction in the reader. What exactly IS a secular elitist? If they actually exist then they must have an official organization or a clubhouse, right? The author makes them sound so prevalent and ominous. Let's be honest Mr. Mohler, you (or someone like you) made that nonsense up. If you can't make your point without invoking some imaginary "enemy" then you're not worth listening to. Try again without the scare tactics and you'll sound a lot more believable.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:06 am |
    • twiddly

      Excellent point!

      This article is full of nonsense, such as this tidbit:
      "...Dawkins...wondering aloud how anyone who questions evolution could be considered intelligent, even as polls indicate that a majority of Americans question evolution..."

      So we should base our beliefs on what the majority thinks, rather than the facts, right?
      Like when the majority believed the earth was flat and the sun revolved around the earth. Yeah, right.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:14 am |
  8. Nix68

    I would prefer NOT to entrust the country to someone who believes in a book so filled with violence and murder. Conscious disregard for facts and the belief in "magic" is not a character trait that I want in a leader.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:05 am |
    • GetErDonee

      Nice overstatements about evangelicals. What "non-magic" do you believe in that you would want to force on the rest of us?

      October 16, 2011 at 9:07 am |
    • Diane

      I would like to force common sense and wisdom on you.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:17 am |
    • Nix68

      Divine intervention, miracles, burning bushes, reanimation of dead tissue is nothing more than Harry Potter magic. Science, supported by observed events, explained by our best theory, subject to demonstration and critical analysis is NOT "magic". scientific theory (take your pic) could be wrong, but that is not an argument that some guy in a white beard is up there tinkering with reality. If there were a god, I would oppose him for the cruel nature and callous regard he/she/it treats us.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:34 am |
    • Nix68

      I suppose reanimation of dead tissue might be a possibility depending on your caveat's ie. how dead is dead, brain damage, etc.. Zombies would be cool.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:14 am |
  9. tom

    In a secular society, you're free to believe in what you want and I'm free to believe what I want. But the evangelical movement is active in pushing its views into legislation, restricting the rights of others based on their religious views e.g. "marriage protection" ballot initiatives in various states (which ironically don't protect marriage from divorce, just gays)

    October 16, 2011 at 9:05 am |
  10. Colin

    To put it in context, as to why we atheists reject the Christian god, first you have to understand that I believe in Leprechauns.

    I believe that the Leprechaun King created the entire Universe about 6,000 years ago. I know there is a substantial amount of evidence suggesting that the Universe is significantly older than this, but I think a lot of that evidence comes from bad science, or from a worldwide conspiracy of scientists who want to deny Leprechauns. I know this because it is written in the Leprechaun Chronicles, a book cobbled together from various authors, most unknown, by our church during the Dark Ages.

    The Leprechaun King lives in Leprechaun Heaven, where he busies himself answering prayers, running the Universe and recording the lives of humans for their final judgment before him. He is surrounded by an entire society of magical beings – his son Merlin, the Holy Leprechaun Spirit, the good fairy Mary, thousands of other fairies, pixies and the souls of many millions of dead people.

    Each Leprechaun pixie has a special task. For example, Saint Christopher is the patron-pixie of travelers and it is his job to intercede with the Leprechaun king on behalf of travelers to keep them safe. Most countries and professions similarly have a special Leprechaun who pays them special attention – even lawyers. There are strict rules governing the roles, responsibilities of the various Leprechauns, elves, pixies and other heavenly beings.

    I believe that the Leprechaun King loves me and hears my prayers. He intervenes in my life periodically by saving me from various ills. All I have to do is think to myself and he reads my mind and answers my prayers. He loves me and when I die, provided I have lived a good life, I will go to Leprechaun Heaven, where I will live happily ever after with all other humans who have ever led good lives.

    I know there is not a lot of evidence to support my beliefs, but that is just the point. The Leprechaun King wants us to have “faith,” so he never reveals himself. To make an unambiguous appearance and settle once and for all the question of his existence would deprive us of free will and, even though he is all knowing, he would not know who his true believers were.

    In fact, I believe that the Leprechaun King is “beyond understanding”. He is “outside the Universe” and any time I am faced with something about my Leprechaun belief that makes no sense, I don’t dare question it, I just close my mind and tell myself that "the Leprechaun King moves in mysterious ways" or that my mind is too small to understand the greatness of the Leprechaun King. These answers are satisfying to me.

    Some people, called “atheists,” are skeptical of my belief in the Leprechaun King. They point out many inherent contradictions and unsupported assumptions that underwrite my belief in Leprechauns. But, they can’t prove he doesn’t exist, so he must exist. They also can't definitively explain where the Universe came from or how life on Earth first started, so it must be the Leprechaun King.

    And so what! Even if I am wrong, and go my whole life believing in nonexistent Leprechauns, I have lost nothing, however, if they are wrong, the Leprechaun King will send them to hell to burn forever in the presence of the Evil Ground Troll.

    Am I convincing you to believe in Leprechauns yet?

    When you Evangelicals reflect on why I have not conviced you to believe in Leprechauns, you will understand why I do not believe in your god and other sky-fairies.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:04 am |
    • kimsland

      All hail the wonderous leprechaun.
      jesus is dead, and so ends this fairytale

      October 16, 2011 at 9:06 am |
    • tom

      I thought Christopher got demoted – I don't think he's the patron pixie of travelers anymore

      October 16, 2011 at 9:07 am |
    • Saturn

      I wager you're going to convert at least a few people to Leprechaunism by this post.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:08 am |
    • LOL

      it makes imminently more sense, and the Irish let you drink. i'm game.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:10 am |
    • Dan

      Thats it. I want to believe in... what you call this... Lubercat all mighty god. He is our svior. I will build a church and call it St. Coling.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:12 am |
    • jemzinthekop

      Just wait until a minister in Leprechaun faith tells voters that The Church of Latter Day Leprechauns is a cult.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:12 am |
    • Sean

      Great analogy. Really puts in perspective.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:40 am |
  11. CCCDAUGHER

    It amazes me that the "Born again" are so Anti Abortion, but turn a blind eye, to our young Soldiers, Marines and Navy Medics that are "aborted" as they are entering manhood, while fighting a war of choice. A war concieved for the gluttony of Oil and to protect Israel at all cost. Of course they can't be "Zapped to Heaven" unless Israel is occupied by the Hebrews!

    October 16, 2011 at 9:04 am |
    • Greg

      Woah! Good to see you stretching a little, but WOW! Talk about a misrepresentation of multiple issues in one terrible analogy. Some of our atheist friends are getting pretty hysterical - I can just smell it coming when someone poses a viewpoint different from their own. It's amazing how much more tolerant Christians are of atheists than atheists are of Christians. All I can picture see is glowing eyes and indignation as you folks peck away at your keyboards. Eventually we'll find out who's right. Hopefully people are open minded and willing to actually seek out the truth in the meantime.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:32 am |
  12. jordan

    I put these type of people as "DANGEROUS" and here is my short reasoning for my statement.
    Simply put these type of people and their movements want to change the world into a Christian Nation.I am not a Christian and I only believe if there was a Jesus he was a man......................like Moses or Joseph or Abraham.
    My Religous Beliefs have nothing to do with theirs and they would want to force me to believe like them.This is unfair to all of us.There is no way I will follow one of these people who spout GOD and think they can run a Country of many Religions.
    Keep God out of Government.It is not fair Politiccs to involve GOD with Government.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:04 am |
    • GetErDonee

      So what would you have the rest of us Americans do? Nothing? Nothing is not an option and a vacuum is quickly filled with something. That something can either be baseless atheism, crazy Islam or sane Christianity – I opt for the latter.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:10 am |
    • twiddly

      Hey GetErDonee, you leave out the obvious (and most practical) choice: separation of church and state.
      Then you have no worries about sharia law or anything else.
      However, you want to force your religion on everyone because yours is the "best" or the "one true religion" or whatever.

      You need to remember most christians (or any other faith) only believe what they believe because they were brainwashed as children to beileve whatever their parents believed, and so the vicious cycle continues.
      It's time to stop believing in santa claus, which is as relevant as christianity in the real world.

      And "baseless atheism"? How funny. Atheism is absence of belief, so "belief-less" is probably a better term.
      I'd say "baseless christianity" is more apt, as there is no "basis" for belief in your imaginary beings.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:34 am |
  13. paul

    Yes, Evangelicals ARE dangerous in the sense that they think they are right and everyone else is wrong and they are trying to remake the USA in their own image. I do not follow or agree with their view of the teachings of Jesus and what he brought to us. It doesn't matter what they think about abortion or gays and any other dumb thing they believe but that they are willing to FORCE every one else to believe the same. That is just plain wrong.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:04 am |
    • kimsland

      Religion is WRONG, agreed

      October 16, 2011 at 9:04 am |
  14. jim dandy

    How much did they pay you to run this? Are you going to give other religious groups the same opportunity to preach to the masses? CNN has lost its news worthiness.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:03 am |
  15. Neil

    The problem with Evangelicals is that they want to take away the rights of secular americans
    1. Abortion
    2. Gay rights

    Whereas the secular folks respect the rights of all communities. That's why evangelicals and other cultural and social conservatives are dangerous

    October 16, 2011 at 9:02 am |
    • deist

      How many atheists have supported the father's right to choose?

      October 16, 2011 at 9:04 am |
    • LOL

      Every athiest that's gotten a call 9 months later demanding money after being lied to, would be a safe guess.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:06 am |
    • Saturn

      What? A father's right to choose what happens to someone else's body?

      How is that supposed to make sense?

      October 16, 2011 at 9:09 am |
    • Choose dominion

      Father's right to choose what? Dominion over the mothers physical body and make decisions for her.....How sharia like you are.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:10 am |
    • deist

      If its all someone else's body, how does the father get roped into 18 years of child support?

      October 16, 2011 at 9:11 am |
    • Siskiyoutopian

      Ironic that you say secularists support all communities – you mean all of them except those who say they are Christian. You probably support Muslims, Atheists, Buddhists, Zaoists, Hindus, Gays, African Americans, Mexican Americans, . . . . . . you support anyone as long as they aren't Christian. Doesn't that seem strange to you? It seems strange to me!! But no one seems to notice that the prejudice is just shifting. Secularists are PREJUDICE!! But no one criticizes them for it – because they are so "open minded" (except if you are a Christian). If you are a Christian then your beliefs don't matter, you are fodder for criticism and slander. Could a thread like this exist on CNN for Islam – I don't think so!

      Why can't a difference in beliefs be acceptable? Isn't that exactly what the secularists want (as long as it isn't Christian). The secularists say 'you can believe anything you want as long as you aren't a Christian'.

      I'm so confused by the logic of the secularist movement. 'Movement'?? So is it secular vs. Christian? Seems like it, doesn't it? Who wins? I don't know! But why do you care so much? Just vote the way the your beliefs dictate you should vote. Isn't this what America is all about? Everyone votes – Atheists, Muslims, Buddhists, Christians. . . . . . most votes win. JUST VOTE!!!! Want Gay marriage? Vote for it! Want Abortion? Keep voting for the people who want abortion. It isn't rocket science! In the meantime we ALL can voice our opinions. Again, that is what America is all about.

      So, keep bashing Christians or whoever you want (except Muslims, because that would be dangerous) and live your life.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:31 am |
    • twiddly

      Hey Siskiyoutopian,
      You are absolutely wrong.
      Atheists and secularists make no distinction between any religions, be they christian or anything else.

      As a general rule (and I don't pretend to speak for all, but this is commonly accepted), there is no place in law or politics for religion. Period.

      There, that's pretty simple. Not forcing anything on you. Not bashing any religion in particular.
      However, the author of this article is a christian evangelical and so he invites criticism specific to his espoused beliefs.
      And most atheists and secularists would indeed label him and his ilk as dangerous (and, IMHO, rightly so).

      October 16, 2011 at 9:41 am |
  16. severinus

    The article presents a false dichotomy – you are either an atheist or an evangelical. I have news for you: there are liberal Christians out there. There are also Jews, Buddhists, Muslims, etc. Evangelicals think that their way is the only way and they have the right to force it on everyone else. They don't.

    BTW, evolution is not a matter of opinion any more than gravity is a matter of opinion. You can observe evolution in a petri dish. It is the reason you need to get a new flu shot every year. It happened, and it is happening before our very eyes. To deny such an obvious truth – such an easily observable fact -is lunacy.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:01 am |
    • kimsland

      Religion is lunacy agreed

      October 16, 2011 at 9:03 am |
  17. SavedbyGrace

    Religion = division. Relationship = unity. Christ Jesus was a bidge, not a wall builder. Forget for the moment, nations, peoples, cultures, and diversity and focus solely on having a realtionship with the Creator of life. Repent of your sins and place your faith in Jesus Christ as your Lord and Savior and you will not only be Frogiven and Saved – You will have a Peace that surpasses any tranquility the world can offer. Without an eternal perspective there will always be greed, hatred, war, and division....No matter who is in Office. Grace & Peace to you <

    October 16, 2011 at 9:00 am |
    • kimsland

      jesus christ was a liar and foolish pathetic man.
      Glad they gave him capital punishment, I'd do the same today

      October 16, 2011 at 9:02 am |
    • twiddly

      Search the comments for the Leprechaun King post and you will see the idiocy of your statements.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:44 am |
    • Nix68

      Kimsland – that is a bit extreme. I think that today we might provide a worm safe place for a barefoot, homeless, man who has visions. A hospital if treatable, Utah if not.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:48 am |
  18. Mei

    The author is correct, it is CHRISTIANS who have advocated for democracy throughout American history and freedom of religion. It is atheists and their like, that have done the reverse.. taking away the human rights and religious freedom of others.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:00 am |
    • Saturn

      two words: gay rights

      October 16, 2011 at 9:02 am |
    • LOL

      Christians, maybe, but sure as hell not the evangelicals.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:02 am |
    • Jim P.

      I'm an atheist. I believe everyone should have basic healthcare and that the rich should help the poor. Christians seem to vote otherwise. As for religions freedom, all I'm asking is that they stop forcing their religion on others.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:09 am |
    • Anafiel

      drink kool-aid much?

      October 16, 2011 at 9:11 am |
    • CarGuy350z

      Do some studying and you will find that our founding fathers (and mothers) were seldom christian, so don't be giving credit where credit is not due. To quote one agnostic who had a great deal to do with democracy and freedoms, "THe priests of the different religious sects... dread the advance of science as witches do the approach of daylight, and scowl on the fatal harbinger announcing the subdivision of the duperies on which they live." – Thomas Jefferson. So go about being a dupery if you are so inclined, but study your history, stop making claims that aren't true and get out of my life (by trying to sway politics and affect my rights).

      October 16, 2011 at 9:13 am |
    • Nix68

      good quote carguy, am adding to my collection.
      Democracy is a concept that came after Christianity. Did the RCC ever promote democracy during the middle ages?
      There have been some good christians, my grandmother comes to mind, but generally i find that those are few and far between with a majority being hypocrites who pick and choose from the bible. I've not met many non christians in person so can only base my opinions on what i read and see.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:03 am |
    • Nix68

      Please pardon my Freudian slip. Democracy came BEFORE christianity. my deepest apologies for my grievous typo. Let he who is without sin cast the first stone.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:10 am |
  19. TommyTT

    Not sure evangelicals are "dangerous." But–as the blogger near my entry demonstrated by calling everyone who disagrees with Christianity "idiots," evangelicals certainly are disrespectful. The basic premise of their "sharing the faith" is "my religion is right, yours is wrong, it's you who must change." It doesn't help that this is "proven" by unprovable supernatural outcomes like "you'll burn in hell if you don't." Personally, I respect everyone's belief systems so long as they don't hurt or denigrate others. Evangelism fails that test.

    October 16, 2011 at 8:59 am |
    • Sandy

      I totally agree with you Tommy TT. An extremist, no matter the charge, is dangerous to a democratic society.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:05 am |
  20. Randy

    If a majority of Americans choose to believe in creation based on nothing but faith and deny evolution despite all the factual evidence supporting it, then I would certainly question their intelligence.

    October 16, 2011 at 8:59 am |
    • Mei

      Actually, speaking from scientific studies, one would need to really question the intelligence of someone who believed whole heartidly in evolution. Evolution is a THEORY and has always been a theory. It has not been proven at all. Those that think it has, need to re-read their scientific journals.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:02 am |
    • Jim P.

      What is the opposite of proof? Faith. As for whether the "theory" of evolution is true or not, science is working on it and religion is working against it. In other words, religion is working against truth.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:12 am |
    • Scot

      I doubt that the majority of Americans that were educated and informed individuals would agree that creationism had any creedance at all. I do think that if you were a good god fearing church goer that you might think that those years from creation to now were in "gods years" like I was tought in Presbyterian Suday school so many years ago so evelution could have exsisted.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:15 am |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.