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My Take: Are evangelicals dangerous?
Many evangelicals want to ban abortion, but does that mean they want theocracy?
October 15th, 2011
10:00 PM ET

My Take: Are evangelicals dangerous?

Editor's Note: R. Albert Mohler, Jr., is president of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, the flagship school of the Southern Baptist Convention and one of the largest seminaries in the world.

By R. Albert Mohler, Jr., Special to CNN

Here we go again.

Every four years, with every new presidential election cycle, public voices sound the alarm that the evangelicals are back. What is so scary about America’s evangelical Christians?

Just a few years ago, author Kevin Phillips told intellectual elites to run for cover, claiming that well-organized evangelicals were attempting to turn America into a theocratic state. In “American Theocracy,” Phillips warned of the growing influence of Bible-believing, born-again, theologically conservative voters who were determined to create a theocracy.

Writer Michelle Goldberg, meanwhile, has warned of a new Christian nationalism, based in “dominion theology.” Chris Hedges topped that by calling conservative Christians “American fascists.”

And so-called New Atheists like Richard Dawkins and Sam Harris claim that conservative Christians are nothing less than a threat to democracy. They prescribe atheism and secularism as the antidotes.

This presidential cycle, the alarms have started earlier than usual. Ryan Lizza, profiling Rep. Michele Bachmann for The New Yorker, informed his readers that “Bachmann belongs to a generation of Christian conservatives whose views have been shaped by institutions, tracts, and leaders not commonly known to secular Americans, or even to most Christians.”

Change just a few strategic words and the same would be true of Barack Obama or any other presidential candidate. Every candidate is shaped by influences not known to all and by institutions that other Americans might find strange.

What stories like this really show is that the secular elites assume that their own institutions and leaders are normative.

The New Yorker accused Bachmann of being concerned with developing a Christian worldview, ignoring the fact that every thinking person operates out of some kind of worldview. The article treated statements about wifely submission to husbands and Christian influence in art as bizarre and bellicose.

When Rick Perry questioned the theory of evolution, Dawkins launched into full-on apoplexy, wondering aloud how anyone who questions evolution could be considered intelligent, even as polls indicate that a majority of Americans question evolution.

Bill Keller, then executive editor of The New York Times, topped all the rest by seeming to suggest that conservative Christians should be compared to those who believe in space aliens. He complained that “when it comes to the religious beliefs of our would-be presidents, we are a little squeamish about probing too aggressively.”

Really? Earlier this month, comedian Penn Jillette - a well–known atheist - wrote a very serious op-ed complaining of the political influence of “bugnut Christians,” in the pages of The Los Angeles Times, no less. Detect a pattern here?

By now, this is probably being read as a complaint against the secular elites and prominent voices in the mainstream media. It’s not.

If evangelicals intend to engage public issues and cultural concerns, we have to be ready for the scrutiny and discomfort that comes with disagreement over matters of importance. We have to risk being misunderstood - and even misrepresented - if we intend to say anything worth hearing.

Are evangelicals dangerous? Well, certainly not in the sense that more secular voices warn. The vast majority of evangelicals are not attempting to create a theocracy, or to oppose democracy.

To the contrary, evangelicals are dangerous to the secularist vision of this nation and its future precisely because we are committed to participatory democracy.

As Christians committed to the Bible, evangelicals have learned to advocate on behalf of the unborn, believing that every single human being, at every stage of development, is made in God’s image.

Evangelicals worry about the fate of marriage and the family, believing that the pattern for human relatedness set out in Scripture will lead to the greatest human flourishing.

We are deeply concerned about a host of moral and cultural issues, from how to address poverty to how to be good stewards of the earth, and on some of these there is a fairly high degree of disagreement even among us.

Above all, evangelicals are those who believe that Jesus Christ is Lord and are most concerned about telling others about Jesus. Most of America’s evangelical Christians are busy raising their children, working to support their families and investing energy in their local churches.

But over recent decades, evangelical Christians have learned that the gospel has implications for every dimension of life, including our political responsibility.

We’re dangerous only to those who want more secular voices to have a virtual monopoly in public life.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of R. Albert Mohler, Jr.

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Christianity • Opinion • Politics

soundoff (5,318 Responses)
  1. RichXX

    Its not how evangelicals believe that is a problem, it is that they believe they are doing God's work to force those views on everyone else. That is why this past summer I changed my voter registration from republican to independent. I was a republican for 42 years. I feel candidates like Michele Bachmann and Rick Perry are more dangerous than Obama. If it came down to Perry against Obama in 2012 I will not vote. I will stay home and spend the day throwing up.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:26 am |
    • W.G.

      to richxx- No real Christian is forcing you to do anything . If you think the republican party is the only people
      on the planet to have the ear of God your WRONG there too . The people that scare me are the Atheist they
      are ready to kill at the drop of a hat and are ready to to tell you your wrong at the drop of a hat for your
      beliefs . Pol pot stalin hitler stalin killed millions because life was´nt sacred to them HAHA! Who are the real monsters
      ATHEISTS !

      October 16, 2011 at 9:43 am |
    • Jeff Williams

      """hitler"""

      Here we go with this lie again.

      W.G.: do you know what the Wehrmacht was? google it

      Are you familiar with the phrase "gott mit uns"? google it

      Did you know that German soldiers in WWII wore this phrase, which means "God is With Us" on their belt buckles? Gee, you think that godless Catholic Hitler would be cool with that?

      October 16, 2011 at 10:02 am |
  2. rr

    I love how people call me hate filled and yet they are the ones bashing Christians and God. I believe in Jesus as my lord and savior and will pray for those who are lost. If knowing right from wrong is a bad thing then I am guilty. I would rather have Jesus than silver or gold. Good day to all you haters.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:26 am |
    • Saturn

      We atheists don't hate you, or any other Christians. We just think you're sick. A little woozy in the head, you know.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:28 am |
    • fercho

      Self righteousness doesn't become a christian. A little humility is better advised.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:36 am |
  3. Al Russell

    When Christians are able to admit that they are but one of many world-wide religions and are not due special treatment under the law over the other faiths, then they may be worth listening to. For now though, the hypocrisy of expecting their faith to be granted special favor over others makes their arguments worthless. Members of every faith think that they are the only "right" ones. What they seem unable to grasp is that to many of us they all look roughly the same. If the evangelicals want prayer in school and moral teachings enforced as law then they must accept the inclusion of the moral teachings of every faith, not just theirs. One example would be the Wicca. It is a legally recognized organized religion in the US. If we permit prayer in schools, then a Wiccan group could argue that they also have the right to proselytize to the children. Would the Christians accept that? Oh, I don't think so. Because they believe that they are the only "right" ones and don't care that the rest of us don't agree with them. Basically, what WE believe just isn't as important as what THEY believe, so lets throw the law out the window and let them decide what's best for the rest of us poor heathens. We've seen this kind of thinking many times before, in Spain and Rome. Look how that ended up.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:26 am |
  4. Ernesto Castillo

    As I read these comments, I feel a sense of hope that there are so many people who embrace reason and reject the nonsense being propagated by the likes of Albert Mohler. But I have to wonder, Where are all of you in society? If you are an atheist, be proud of your beliefs and share them in a respectful manner with those in your community. You may not need to be militant to be effective but don't be silent. Let your (real) voices be heard.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:24 am |
    • Kate

      I find no 'reason' in this tome, it's the usual pushing a fundamental christian agenda into my life, which I don't want.. when a christian zealot starts telling me that the bible says I should be political, it's time to pass a law in this country (again) to separation of church and state .. SEPARATION... keep your religious opinions to yourself and I will keep my dislike of your relgious opinions to myself, I will pass you on the street, tip my hat, say good morning... our founding fathers left their country for religious freedom, which also means the right to NOT practice religion.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:36 am |
  5. Hear My Voice

    The people I know who sit in a shrinks chair every week are those that have very little religious tolerance (hint, hint...liberals). Christianity...no matter what you libs say, gives purpose and dignity to our lives. No one said we were perfect. I am so glad to have had loving, committed parents who believed the same thing....Christianity will prevail because we are committed to our faith.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:24 am |
    • LOL

      I'm about as far from a liberal as you can get, and i can't stand believers mucking around with the government and mucking around in my personal life. especially not with dictating morality and then taxing the hell out of me for it.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:27 am |
    • PulTab

      Of course your parents believed in the same thing. That's how generation after generation of children get indoctrinated into religious nonsense.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:28 am |
    • fleur

      I'm on the liberal side of the political spectrum, and you know what? I am totally willing to let YOU practice your religion of choice on your own (assuming, of course, that you are not causing harm to other people). What I do not want is for you to make ME live by YOUR religious principles.

      Is it religiously tolerant to try to force nonbelievers to live according to the rules of a religion they don't agree with?

      October 16, 2011 at 9:30 am |
    • Kate

      I know of NO aethists who sit in chairs at shrinks offices.. your basis for that remark? I have met people who were brainwashed by religious cults who are in shrinks offices though.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:37 am |
    • Jack P.

      Well, if Kate says it's true, then it MUST be because she knows EVERY atheist and EVERY person who's ever been to a shrink. Kate is just hateful and hypocritical. She's the epitome of what America stands for - tolerance and diversity. If someone mentions Jesus or she sees any religious symbols, she goes into a rage and sues. She's the worst sort of non-believer. She's a bully. Read her comments and see if you can't see her rage. Why isn't there an article on CNN about how dangerous she and others like her are?

      October 16, 2011 at 9:54 am |
  6. Luis

    I pry for the coming of the "Emporer of Mankind". He will take humanity into the stars to conquer it and claim the Milky Way galaxy for mankind. He will destroy all false deities and set us on the path of logic and science.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:24 am |
    • LOL

      Hail, Ming, Hail. Emperor of the Universe.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:28 am |
    • PulTab

      The Flying Spaghetti Monster?

      October 16, 2011 at 9:36 am |
    • thinkforyourself

      Yeah Luis, only took the second reply to show us just the kind of crazy that the GOP is pushing to get into the White House...

      October 16, 2011 at 9:36 am |
  7. Kate

    This is exactly what I want: those who want more secular voices to have a virtual monopoly in public life. I feel strangled by the reglious right, conservative, tea party, crazies, those that would take a woman's right to choose.. I despise that, I have seen exactly what back-street abortions do.. How dare you take my rights away.. It is shameful. You have NO RIGHT to tell me how to live, what to live by, and who to worship or NOT. I find it reprehensible that a group of mostly men (yes there are some women but groups mostly led by men, the Mormons being as bad as Catholics in denying women a place in their 'church') I did NOT want my children to pray in school, they went to school to learn, not pray, I don't care if there is a class for bible learning, it is a tool for learning, but making my kid pray before football games infuriated me, a 2 minute moment of silence for contemplation, care and praying for those who do is ENOUGH. Let me tell a little story: when I was growing up in NY state (upstate) my very best friend was Jewish, we played, I went to Temple, she did not go to church with me but I told her all about my (catholic) guardian angel, we shared Christmas and Hanukkah, literally our parents shared us in a formal way to introduce us to other religions, off I go to parochial school and don't hang around with her anymore.. meet up in 12th grade, she runs over to me and starts crying ... saying and I quote: (my name) I didn't kill Jesus Christ, I am sorry!!! I felt so bad as a kid when good friday and easter came.. that I somehow killed Jesus' it was horrible, that was a life changing moment.. when we become intolerant and we push religion into the securlar world, we hurt children and people. Religion should be practiced in the home on Sunday or Friday mass, service.. religion should be private, personal and wonderful.. in this country it has become LOUD, RUDE, INSENSITIVE and just plain MEAN.
    It is not your business to tell me about Jesus and his story, I can read.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:24 am |
    • Jack P.

      And it's not your job to interfere with anyone's freedom of religion or speech. By the way, it's not freedom FROM religion. If that's what you want, you don't want to live in America.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:51 am |
  8. fleur

    "When Rick Perry questioned the theory of evolution, Dawkins launched into full-on apoplexy, wondering aloud how anyone who questions evolution could be considered intelligent, even as polls indicate that a majority of Americans question evolution."

    So you're assuming that the majority view is the "intelligent" view? What about when the majority view was that the earth was flat, or that black people were inherently inferior to white people?

    All I get from the statement that most Americans question evolution is deep concern for the miserable state of our educational system.

    (For the record, I would argue that merely doubting evolution is not stupidity, but ignorance – and there is a difference. Bullheaded refusal to even consider many of the established scientific fats supporting the existence of evolution? THAT is stupidity.)

    October 16, 2011 at 9:24 am |
    • fleur

      Oh goodness. "Fats." Of course, I intended to write "facts." 😉

      October 16, 2011 at 9:27 am |
  9. Andy

    Richard Dawkins believes in Evolution, the 4th great religion. He needs to study Quantum Physics....

    October 16, 2011 at 9:23 am |
    • Ncampbell

      Here, here

      October 16, 2011 at 9:30 am |
  10. Freddy

    I have no problem with an evangelical point of view to shape how they, or those who agree with them live their lives and raise their children. The problem lies with them telling me and everyone else who do not agree with them that we should live our lives the same way. That's what the Taliban does. That's what happened in the Spanish Inquisition. That's what the Ayatollah's say.
    If right wing conservatives don't want their female family members to have the right to choose what they do with their own bodies, and assuming the women agree, that's fine. If they don't want their family members to marry people of the same gender, that's fine too. But that shouldn't stop others from having the personal freedom to act in other ways. Isn't that why America was established?
    But that's why religion, any religion, has no place in shaping public policy. It's a slippery slope from "protecting the unborn" to "you must believe in Jesus to vote." Mr. Mohler is saying don't worry, we don't want a theocracy. There are others in his group who will disagree with him.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:23 am |
    • fleur

      +1

      October 16, 2011 at 9:25 am |
    • Kyleigh

      Very good post, Freddy.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:29 am |
    • busterbobby

      Well said.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:33 am |
  11. Saturn

    The funny thing is that Christians always talk about morality and faith and all that, but their entire belief system is based on the idea that if you don't believe, you're going to burn in hell for all of eternity. It's fear, that's all it is. Fear of hell.

    Kind of casts doubt on the sincerity of your belief when you're really just doing it to save your own ass.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:23 am |
    • chrisg

      Agreed

      October 16, 2011 at 9:29 am |
    • busterbobby

      So true. And I am friendly with evangelical people who stick to their denominations for exactly that reason: because if they don't, they'll go to hell, so that they amy see their deceased loved ones after death, even so that they may achieve prosperity. It's all based on fear of hell on one hand and what they're "going to get out of it" on the other. Living right for its own sake is not a big part of it.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:37 am |
  12. kimsland

    I like to see an evangelical believer go to an Islamic country and openly preach his word of jesus.
    Hypocrites, you religious fools always live in fear. Wake up and say NO to religion.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:23 am |
    • Ncampbell

      That's interesting... I know several missionaries in openly hostile muslim countries preaching God's Word right now. (I know this because I am supporting them financially). Don't speak of what you know nothing about.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:28 am |
    • Kyleigh

      Good for you, NCampbell. Give yourself a pat on the back. You have bankrolled their deaths.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:32 am |
    • Jack P.

      kimsland, you really should talk less because you don't know what you're talking about. There ARE Christian pastors in muslim countries preaching. MANY of them. But, since you love Islam so much why are you so supportive of a religion that kills you if you don't convert to islam? You must be just as violent and hate-filled, I guess. You're hate speech and intolerance are very hypocritical.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:37 am |
  13. Jack P.

    Another article by CNN demonizing Christianity, which will shortly be followed up with two supportive, sympathetic articles to the plight of poor muslims. Never once has CNN called Islam dangerous. Their hate speech and lies about Christians and their faith is the epitome of true hate.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:22 am |
    • kimsland

      But Islam say they believe in peace.
      And Christianity believe in fear

      October 16, 2011 at 9:24 am |
    • Kyleigh

      Well, when you've got idiots like Fred Phelps and all of his inbred kids and grandkids running around spouting their hate in the name of Jesus, it's not difficult to find Christianity threatening.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:28 am |
    • Jack P.

      So, Islam just says what it believes and you go right along with it. Then you make up what you want about what Christians believe and that's the absolute truth? Where in the Christian faith does it say they believe in fear? Where? Nowhere? That's your hate and intolerance speaking.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:31 am |
    • Jack P.

      Kyleigh – You can use that as an excuse all you want to. Fred Phelps organization is NOT Christian. They have nothing to do with Christianity. Nor are they actually Baptists. The Baptist Association has denied all association with them. So, why does Fred Phelps just CLAIMING to be Christian make it true for you? Because that's what YOU WANT to believe about Christians. You're just as hateful towards Christianity as Fred Phelps is towards those he believes are not like him. You're doing EXACTLY what he's doing. You're just doing it online.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:34 am |
    • Kyleigh

      Jack, how do you feel about non-religious people or people who are not the same denomination as you? Just out of curiosity.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:34 am |
    • Jack P.

      Kyleigh, I have lots of friends and family members who aren't religious. I have some who are religious but not Christian. It's their choice. That doesn't change my love or support or friendship with them. I don't believe what they believe but I know it's their choice and I respect that. What people really, REALLY need to understand, Kyleigh, is that not everyone who calls themselves a Christian actually IS one. It goes by God's definition in His Word, not by what people pick and choose to believe about Christianity and piece together their own version of it. With God, it's all or nothing. It's His way or it's not of Him at all.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:41 am |
    • Kyleigh

      Oh I don't believe that Phelps REPRESENTS Christianity. I'm just using him as an example because he's in the media and the media uses him (especially on MSNBC) to paint ALL Christians like him. Which is why I said it in the first place. With people like him in the spotlight, it puts a bad light on Christianity as a whole. That was my point. Christians should be going after each other, the likes of him, so the public doesn't have this view of intolerant jerks. If you think I'm like Fred, fine. I don't really care. But I should probably tell you, I'm actually a very tolerant person – I'm a pagan who is married to a Catholic. So, I'm really NOT like him. But you can go ahead and keep believing that if you will. Funny, my husband and I have argued over religion for years and never once has he ever called me intolerant.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:45 am |
    • busterbobby

      @ Jack P Until Kyleigh travels the country with a group of loonies brandishing signs bearing disgusting slogans specifically designed to torment people, than Kyleigh is NOT just as bad as Fred Phelps. Kyleigh is someone simply expressing an opinion on an open forum. You have no sense of proportion, something not uncommon among True Believers. Somebody disagrees with you, so they're "as bad as Fred Phelps." What nonsense! The fact is, you probably agree with most of Fred Phelps' central ideas, even if you're not as nasty a he is. I'm sure you believe that "unrepentant" gay people will burn in hell. And why drag Islam in inot the mix. Another red herring. We're debating the beliefs of a Southern Baptist here, no of an imam. You're just trying to muddy the waters.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:47 am |
  14. dick

    What's scary about religion is that each one thinks they are the only true one and that they're willing to go to war to prove that.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:22 am |
    • Kyleigh

      Isn't this why our Founding Fathers made a republic that had freedom of religion? I think it is.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:24 am |
    • Jack P.

      The problem with people who hate/fear religion is that they're scared to death that there IS only one truth. Of course, when it comes to religion, there can be only one truth. One Creator with one plan and one outcome. The other problem with people who don't like religion is that they don't want it to be true. They don't want to believe that there is Someone bigger and more powerful than themselves. They want to be in control and the thought of a "higher being" KNOWING more than they do scares them. If you understood everything about God and His ways and motives, He wouldn't be much of a God, would He? People who hate religion are rebellious they want to do what they want to do, when they want to do it and not be held accountable for it. That's what it comes down to.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:29 am |
    • Kyleigh

      The problem with people who are religious is that they're scared to death that there IS only one truth. The truth is the lights are gonna go out and your body will be burned or put 6 feet under. And THAT is what scares people. People are afraid of death. So now they read this book that tells them if you do what this man in the sky says, and follow all of his rules, then you will go to Heaven and live happily ever after upon your death. I mean, COME ON. You all fell for it hook, line, and sinker. But, that is your decision to make. Mine is to live life to the fullest, work hard, make a lot of money (which I've already done) and have a blast! If I'm wrong and I go to hell for it, oh well. It was worth it!

      October 16, 2011 at 9:39 am |
    • Jack P.

      Kyleigh, Christians don't fear that at all. If it turned out that there is absolutely nothing after death, then I lost nothing. I love my life and wouldn't change a thing. So, if I'm wrong, I lose nothing. However, if YOU'RE wrong and there IS a God and Christians ARE right, they you LOSE EVERYTHING. I don't say that out of fear mongering. I'm saying it out of the simple fact of the matter. The most important decision ANYONE will ever make in their life is what to do with Jesus Christ – accept or reject Him. The results, and the consequences, are up to each of us individually. No one else to hold accountable but us.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:45 am |
  15. JIm

    Of course they are dangerous. They are a bunch of whackos trying to convert everyone and force them to to live the way they do.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:20 am |
    • Jack P.

      That's exactly what Islam does. Christianity doesn't force anyone to believe what they do. It has to be each person's individual choice. See how important it is to have the right information before you make accusations like that?

      October 16, 2011 at 9:48 am |
  16. Mark

    I am sad that the rancor and public diatribes fill spaces like this. To get the "upper hand" we think the way to assert our way of life we must throw barbs and generalizations that taint public discourse.
    Mr. Mohler has spoken from his perspective. Throwing evangelicals "under the bus" en masse is robbing our country, even our world of real herlp for real problems.
    Real thought should be given to real discourse – not mindless retorts like so many on this page.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:20 am |
    • LOL

      *giggles* you said 'taint'.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:23 am |
    • PulTab

      lol "LOL"

      October 16, 2011 at 9:44 am |
  17. chrisg

    Evangelicals have a right to believe what ever they want. However, they ARE hypocrites and DO NOT have the right to force their faith into the American government. This is pure lunicy. And they sure DO NOT have the right to tell women what to do with their bodies. BTW mei, science is NOT a theory. Is that what the evangelicals teach you? One more thing,
    the evangelical PASTORS the spew lies, division and hate need to be removed immediately.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:20 am |
    • Jimmy

      No anger or danger there huh?

      October 16, 2011 at 9:21 am |
    • LOL

      Mei, isn't that an Asian name? You know what happens when the Asians get a hold of something they think is a good idea. Look at china. *slaps self* oh god. i sound like a fundy. excuse, please.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:24 am |
    • Jack P.

      Wow, Chris. Hate much? Intolerant much? Hypocritical much?

      October 16, 2011 at 9:49 am |
  18. FifthApe

    They are NUTS and dangerous.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:20 am |
  19. Jimmy

    So we are soo dangerous. I work 60 hrs a week my wife works 30 hrs a week, we pay our bills, take care of our family, and try to squeeze out a vacation when we can. We don't have time to be dangerous. Then on the other hand you have the rest of society. Hmm.......and you all wonder why this country along with the rest of the world is in such terrible shape.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:20 am |
    • LOL

      Personally, I blame Canadians.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:21 am |
    • FifthApe

      Not thinking *rationally* is dangerous in this day and age.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:21 am |
    • jemzinthekop

      The people you vote for want to drive a truck up to the Feb and empty it of all your hard earned money? Wait... too late.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:22 am |
    • Jimmy

      And society is rational?

      October 16, 2011 at 9:23 am |
  20. DWT

    This man doesn't seem to realize how much more saturated the USA is with Christian political rhetoric than any other modern Western society. To say that Christianity is threatened with being shut out of our public sphere is simply laughable. The only places I know where a specific religious profession is more compulsory than here are Islamic states (they just promote a different stage of the Abrahamic line).

    October 16, 2011 at 9:19 am |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.