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My Take: Are evangelicals dangerous?
Many evangelicals want to ban abortion, but does that mean they want theocracy?
October 15th, 2011
10:00 PM ET

My Take: Are evangelicals dangerous?

Editor's Note: R. Albert Mohler, Jr., is president of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, the flagship school of the Southern Baptist Convention and one of the largest seminaries in the world.

By R. Albert Mohler, Jr., Special to CNN

Here we go again.

Every four years, with every new presidential election cycle, public voices sound the alarm that the evangelicals are back. What is so scary about America’s evangelical Christians?

Just a few years ago, author Kevin Phillips told intellectual elites to run for cover, claiming that well-organized evangelicals were attempting to turn America into a theocratic state. In “American Theocracy,” Phillips warned of the growing influence of Bible-believing, born-again, theologically conservative voters who were determined to create a theocracy.

Writer Michelle Goldberg, meanwhile, has warned of a new Christian nationalism, based in “dominion theology.” Chris Hedges topped that by calling conservative Christians “American fascists.”

And so-called New Atheists like Richard Dawkins and Sam Harris claim that conservative Christians are nothing less than a threat to democracy. They prescribe atheism and secularism as the antidotes.

This presidential cycle, the alarms have started earlier than usual. Ryan Lizza, profiling Rep. Michele Bachmann for The New Yorker, informed his readers that “Bachmann belongs to a generation of Christian conservatives whose views have been shaped by institutions, tracts, and leaders not commonly known to secular Americans, or even to most Christians.”

Change just a few strategic words and the same would be true of Barack Obama or any other presidential candidate. Every candidate is shaped by influences not known to all and by institutions that other Americans might find strange.

What stories like this really show is that the secular elites assume that their own institutions and leaders are normative.

The New Yorker accused Bachmann of being concerned with developing a Christian worldview, ignoring the fact that every thinking person operates out of some kind of worldview. The article treated statements about wifely submission to husbands and Christian influence in art as bizarre and bellicose.

When Rick Perry questioned the theory of evolution, Dawkins launched into full-on apoplexy, wondering aloud how anyone who questions evolution could be considered intelligent, even as polls indicate that a majority of Americans question evolution.

Bill Keller, then executive editor of The New York Times, topped all the rest by seeming to suggest that conservative Christians should be compared to those who believe in space aliens. He complained that “when it comes to the religious beliefs of our would-be presidents, we are a little squeamish about probing too aggressively.”

Really? Earlier this month, comedian Penn Jillette - a well–known atheist - wrote a very serious op-ed complaining of the political influence of “bugnut Christians,” in the pages of The Los Angeles Times, no less. Detect a pattern here?

By now, this is probably being read as a complaint against the secular elites and prominent voices in the mainstream media. It’s not.

If evangelicals intend to engage public issues and cultural concerns, we have to be ready for the scrutiny and discomfort that comes with disagreement over matters of importance. We have to risk being misunderstood - and even misrepresented - if we intend to say anything worth hearing.

Are evangelicals dangerous? Well, certainly not in the sense that more secular voices warn. The vast majority of evangelicals are not attempting to create a theocracy, or to oppose democracy.

To the contrary, evangelicals are dangerous to the secularist vision of this nation and its future precisely because we are committed to participatory democracy.

As Christians committed to the Bible, evangelicals have learned to advocate on behalf of the unborn, believing that every single human being, at every stage of development, is made in God’s image.

Evangelicals worry about the fate of marriage and the family, believing that the pattern for human relatedness set out in Scripture will lead to the greatest human flourishing.

We are deeply concerned about a host of moral and cultural issues, from how to address poverty to how to be good stewards of the earth, and on some of these there is a fairly high degree of disagreement even among us.

Above all, evangelicals are those who believe that Jesus Christ is Lord and are most concerned about telling others about Jesus. Most of America’s evangelical Christians are busy raising their children, working to support their families and investing energy in their local churches.

But over recent decades, evangelical Christians have learned that the gospel has implications for every dimension of life, including our political responsibility.

We’re dangerous only to those who want more secular voices to have a virtual monopoly in public life.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of R. Albert Mohler, Jr.

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Christianity • Opinion • Politics

soundoff (5,318 Responses)
  1. Ben Thare

    Mr. Mohler's arguments are quite pedestrian and naive. The way that evangelical groups assail social and secular norms and people defy his arguments.

    After all, it was just a few decades ago that evangelicals were against the progression of civil rights.

    Funny thing about evangelicals and atheists ... both seem to have selective memory when it comes to their own misdeeds.

    October 16, 2011 at 11:23 am |
    • ontou

      Gee Ben, you sound so "educated." Maybe that's your problem. You're like so many of the simpleminded. A few call themselves Christians and do stupid things, and you blame the whole lot. Are you a moron? Do you blame the Catholics for the holocaust because Hitler was Catholic? Do you blame the entire Muslim world for 911? And do you blame the eugenics of Nazi Germany on scientists, because scientists conducted those programs? Idiot.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:32 am |
  2. Ted

    SCAtheist, dogma is not reasoning. Yes, domatists using narrow minded, one-sided reasoning, do scare me. This article clearly allows for inclusive society, with all believing what learn to believe. Dawkins does not. Read his books, listen to him.

    October 16, 2011 at 11:23 am |
  3. I.M. Rijus

    Of course this guy, Mohler, doesn't think evangelicals are dangerous - he's one of them. As I former Southern Baptists, I can tell you evangelicals are dangerous. If it were up to them, there would be no separation of church and state. For all of you who think different faiths can co-exist, just ask the Southern Baptists what they believe. Wait, I'll save you the trouble: they believe there is only one way to salvation - through Jesus Christ. So, all of those other believe systems: Judaism, Hinduism, Islam, Buddhism, etc, they are wrong. And, if you don't accept Christ as your personal savior, you are going to hell. Ask the Southern Baptists about that. You can't have dialogue when you start from a position that you are right and everyone else is wrong. And, it's not just Southern Baptists. Other evangelicals believe the same thing. Evangelicals are dangerous. They would be happy making their brand of Christianity the official religion of this country, i.e., make the U.S. a religious state. Don't be fooled by their talks of unity and cooperation. They are dangerous.

    October 16, 2011 at 11:22 am |
    • luvUamerica

      It is their interpretation of Christianity that is very scary. They believe all other Christians will go to hell. I walked out of a church half way through a sermon. It is a cult.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:26 am |
    • groundlerings

      Christ would not recognize anything about himself in evangelicals.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:27 am |
    • ontou

      As a former Southern" Baptists?" That's – "Southern Baptist" I can tell you were really paying attention in the pews.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:37 am |
    • ontou

      "You can't have dialogue when you start from a position that you are right and everyone else is wrong. And, it's not just Southern Baptists. Other evangelicals believe the same thing."

      Really? Is that how you approached your classes in high school (assuming you went to high school)? You went into your math class making it clear that if the teacher was going to carry out any real teaching, he or she had to allow for everyone to be "right". Are you serious? If Christians ARE right, then why should they believe you? You need to show why YOU are right, and bashing doesn't get it. Make a real argument, or sit down. Holy crap, the "fair" thing in American needs to stop. If you can present an argument that is better than "my way is as good as your way" THEN you'll see the Bible go away. Problem is no one has been able to do that for over 2,000 years. I doubt you'll be the first.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:41 am |
    • Anon

      It's because you people are stubborn when it comes to facts and evidence. As long as 1 + 1 = Jesus, then everything is ok for you.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:57 am |
  4. God

    This dude is scary. Oh wait, he is mainstream religion. Very scary then...

    October 16, 2011 at 11:22 am |
  5. chrisg

    Evangelicals want to make their religious beliefs the law of the land. (sounds like the Talibian)

    October 16, 2011 at 11:22 am |
    • ontou

      Their religious beliefs have been the law of the land for centuries – it's what's given you formal education, hospitals, law, and this country itself. People who don't want the Christian ideals that have given you what you enjoy and take for granted everyday should move elsewhere. As far as the Taliban – they hate the fact that you have hospitals, formal education and laws that protect the individual. If you agree – sounds like you're the Taliban.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:29 am |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      Since when are the ideals of individual freedom and rights exclusive to Christianity? Oh, I forgot: you dimbulbs don't know anything about history, either.

      October 16, 2011 at 12:09 pm |
  6. Peter

    The writer says that "...polls indicate that a majority of Americans question evolution..." Anybody who refers to polls as a method of settling whethere a theory is correct or not is nothing less than ignorant bigot. If you made polls around 15th century, most people would say that the sun circles the earh. Turned out to be quite the contrary. Please don't refer to polls to justify the merit of the state of matters. You just disqualify yourself as credible person, but again tha is teh nature of christian fundamentalist. Equally oppresive as muslim fundamentalist. Religion is divisive and not divine.

    October 16, 2011 at 11:21 am |
    • God

      Let alone the implication he makes that it is not reality. Very sick people.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:23 am |
    • ontou

      Come on Peter – stop believing your own press. He's merely stating a fact. Educated people have started to see that the theory of evolution is bankrupt. Not everyone of course – obviously you still hold on to the dark ages and cling to Dawkins. Even so, he just pointed out a fact. Sorry you don't like it.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:48 am |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      No one with any sort of decent education doubts that evolution is occurring, has occurred, and will continue to occur.

      Those who don't understand what "theory" means in the context of science reveal themselves to be among the uneducated religious dolts.

      October 16, 2011 at 12:35 pm |
  7. Dan

    Having been raised a Christian, and recovering ever since, I find it hard to support anyone who doesn't believe in evolution, who prays to imaginary spirits, and who thinks God is on their side. However, I really despise our arrogant president obama and will vote for anybody but him. I think he's trashed the nation and needs to go.

    October 16, 2011 at 11:21 am |
    • ontou

      Take a pill Dan. Just because you lost it doesn't mean everyone else needs to. The theory of evolution used to be called "adaptation" years ago because scientists knew better. They took a bad turn, and were successful in getting evolution into all the text books in school – the ones you read. We lost a couple of generations to that tripe (you're in that group – sorry.) and now they are coming around to seeing that evolution is a fairy tale for grown-ups. Don't blame this guy for telling you that your belief system is hosed. That's something for you to deal with.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:51 am |
    • Anon

      ^ Christard alert.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:58 am |
  8. Tim J

    Behavior is contagious right. What should be the headline of today? Two – 2 – New York police officers in the hospital today after 70 people were arrested in the Occupy Wall Street criminals. 1.5 million dollars in damaged done by Occupy Wall Street in Italy and who is messing with our 401K retirement investment funds?

    What principles did Obama teach when he was president. It is much better to ruled by the following principles from rules for radicals.
    RULE 1: "Power is not only what you have, but what the enemy thinks you have."
    RULE 2: "Never go outside the expertise of your people."
    RULE 3: "Whenever possible, go outside the expertise of the enemy."
    RULE 5: "Ridicule is man's most potent weapon."
    RULE 6: "A good tactic is one your people enjoy."
    RULE 7: "A tactic that drags on too long becomes a drag."
    RULE 8: "Keep the pressure on. Never let up."
    RULE 9: "The threat is usually more terrifying than the thing itself."
    RULE 10: "If you push a negative hard enough, it will push through and become a positive."
    RULE 11: "The price of a successful attack is a constructive alternative."
    RULE 12: Pick the target, freeze it, personalize it, and polarize it."

    This is the threat to America today.

    October 16, 2011 at 11:21 am |
    • chrisg

      lol trying to change the subject?

      October 16, 2011 at 11:23 am |
    • klarg

      What right-wing comic books do you get this stuff from?

      October 16, 2011 at 12:27 pm |
  9. Stats

    @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ STATS @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ Not sure what this proves: but I took a count of all the posts made between 5:01am & 6:59 80, about 2 hours) posts/ atheists– 42 writers; 28) posts/believers– 17 writers (most Christians); 16) posts/undetermined beliefs –15 writers. I don't garntee that this 100% correct, but that's not the point, the point is the very lop-sideded numbers. Atheists posters out-number belivers by more than double the number, and atheists make almost three times as many posts as belivers. It is noted that there are far more belivers in the U.S. than atheists. Only is about14% claim to be atheist. There is approxmately 35–45% claiming to be practicing Christians; the rest are various other religions or non-active Christians (those who claime to believe there is a Christ). The question is: why is there such a larger percent of atheists posting more often than belivers?

    October 16, 2011 at 11:21 am |
    • God

      General intelligence and the knowledge that it is time to step up and be heard.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:25 am |
    • Ted

      Atheists want to convert Christians to nihilism.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:25 am |
    • Credenza

      Probably because Atheirsts simgle purpose in life is to discredit Christianity. So every time there is a post with the slightest hint of Christianity in it – out they slide to debunk it.

      If they're SO worried about it it probably means that Christianity, and a firm belief in God, is REALLY worth having. Which ,of course , we KNOW is true.

      Atheists have been responsible for more murders[ Political and religious] than ALL the religions in history. And before you Atheists crawl out of your cupboard and whine "but Stalin, Hitler were Catholic / Marx and Lenin were Jews" Forget it. A Communist and Fascist kicked their religion to the kerb. Communists ans Fascists are by definition [and their OWN admission] do NOT believe in God so how can they be members of any religion????

      October 16, 2011 at 11:33 am |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      Oh, isn't that cute? Credenza thinks she/he knows something. You are a moron. Atheists simply don't believe there's a god. They don't care if you believe there is one, only that you don't attempt to force your religious beliefs on others and by doing so infringe upon their legal rights.

      Educate yourself.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:40 am |
  10. sockeyerama

    Author writes, “Bill Keller, then executive editor of The New York Times, topped all the rest by seeming to suggest that conservative Christians should be compared to those who believe in space aliens.”
    Bill Keller actually wrote, “If a candidate for president said he believed that space aliens dwell among us, would that affect your willingness to vote for him?”
    “Aliens” versus “Aliens living among us”. May seem subtle on the surface, but these are significantly different ideas.
    I have always marveled at not only how skilled some conservative Christians are at lying (almost as though it’s part of seminary curriculum) but also at their evangelically inspired brazenness.

    October 16, 2011 at 11:21 am |
  11. Dana

    Give. Me. A. Break. SECULAR ELITES? How many atheists can you name in Congress, Mr. Mohler? Now, how many Christians can you name in Congress? So who are the elites? Sorry bud, but when your demographic has been in the majority and position of complete power for the past 1800 years, you don't get to turn over on your belly and play the victim. The majority of Individual Christians aren't anti-democracy, but the problem is that their religion IS. When Moses ascended the Mount of Sinai, God didn't tell Moses to create an assembly of Israelites to elect what was good for themselves like we do in our Democracy. No, he infused the law into immutable stone and told the "people of God" he'd zap them with lightening if they had something different to say about it. That's not Democracy. That's dictatorship. It worked great in the Bronze Age. I don't think it works as well in the information age.

    October 16, 2011 at 11:20 am |
    • Credenza

      "Dictatorship"............. hmmm! – Works well for Obama and HE"S a Christian. You can't get enough of him. You Dems seriously need to get your act together.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:38 am |
  12. Stats

    @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ STATS @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ Not sure what this proves: but I took a count of all the posts made between 5:01am & 6:59 80, about 2 hours) posts/ atheists– 42 writers; 28) posts/believers– 17 writers (most Christians); 16) posts/undetermined beliefs –15 writers. I don't garntee that this 100% correct, but that's not the point, the point is the very lop-sideded numbers. Atheists posters out-number belivers by more than double the number, and atheists make almost three times as many posts as belivers. It is noted that there are far more belivers in the U.S. than atheists. Only is about14% claim to be atheist. There is approxmately 35–45% claiming to be practicing Christians; the rest are various other religions or non-active Christians (those who claime to believe there is a god). The question is: why is there a larger percent of atheists posting more often than belivers?

    October 16, 2011 at 11:19 am |
    • kimsland

      Actually stats thanks for that, I'd be interested in future blogs here too.
      Thanks 🙂

      October 16, 2011 at 11:22 am |
    • Colin

      Interesting stats. I have often felt we atheists are disproportionatley represented here. If the numbers in the general popoulation reflected your count, the USA would be very secular. Unfortunatley, that is probably still a generation or two ahead of us.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:24 am |
    • Will

      Big difference in being secular and not beliving in God....

      October 16, 2011 at 11:26 am |
    • Dave D

      Because the believers are reading fox news.com

      October 16, 2011 at 11:31 am |
    • Credenza

      @DaveD – I'm not American but I watch ALL news channels. What Iv'e noticed is that when a Republican politician is interviewed on CNN the interviewer is antagonistic and biased toward the Democrats. When they interview the same Republican on Fox the interview is balanced.
      Maybe that's why the whining Democrats hate Fox News so much.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:43 am |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      Credenza/Adelina, you have no reason to comment on American politics. Why don't you fix your own backyard?

      October 16, 2011 at 12:10 pm |
  13. kimsland

    Since some religious fools seem to conjugate here.
    STOP abusing kids. I speak for all children. NO religion NO

    October 16, 2011 at 11:19 am |
    • DaveinCincy

      Maybe instead of posting derogatory things, you should actually volunteer some time to help abused children. I have...how about you? Or are you in the 99% of atheists who just talk a good game, but give nothing. I'm guessing the latter.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:25 am |
    • kimsland

      Actually I would like to help children teens, so forth.
      I have no idea how to get involved in this
      I thought you needed a degree in child services?

      October 16, 2011 at 11:29 am |
    • DaveinCincy

      Not at all...the only thing you'll need is a background check.
      Just be selective about where you volunteer...I spent some time volunteering at a center for abused kids...and it was gut wrenching, ultimately not something that worked for me. So- I volunteered at Childrens Hospital and it worked much better.
      My degree is in business...so your degree doesn't matter. You can have a HUGE impact on some really needy kids. Good luck! I hope you do it...it's more rewarding than you can possibly imagine.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:36 am |
    • Credenza

      @Kimsland – Yes child abuse isabhorrent to all thinking people. But it is NOT confined to religions! I have worked in teaching AND with Social Services / child protection for 40 years so DON'T you tell me that religion is solely responsible. 80%of abuse is carried out in families! Many of them with no religion at all.

      A religion is made up of people. People can and do terrible things. But the FAITH doesn't change.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:49 am |
  14. luvUamerica

    And what a hypocrite!

    "We’re dangerous only to those who want more secular voices to have a virtual monopoly in public life." And these guy wants control of everything, and tell people how to live their lives. It is amazing how guys like this can spew crap, and people gobble it up. Jim Jones comes to my mind when I think of the evangelicals.

    They are a political cult.

    October 16, 2011 at 11:18 am |
  15. DaveinCincy

    Be thankful for Christians...otherwise no one would be there to work the soup kitchens, take care of the needy, and freely give their wealth and time. Atheists talk a good game but ultimately are self serving and selfish. There are fanaticals in every group including Atheists. Simply tee'ing up Christianity on a Sunday morning to bash is weak. C'mon CNN...you have nothing better to cover?

    October 16, 2011 at 11:18 am |
    • luvUamerica

      Yeah right!

      October 16, 2011 at 11:20 am |
    • Will

      Seriously dude, get off the cross. Most people I know that volunteer do not go to any church. Get a clue.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:23 am |
    • luvUamerica

      IWe are not talking about Christians here. Christians and Evangelicals are two different things. Evangelicals are a political cult!

      October 16, 2011 at 11:23 am |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      What a load. Back up your claims with statistics. You can't, because they're not accurate. And if you're here, who's in the soup kitchen today? Someone else who doesn't need to break his arm patting himself on the back or polishing his halo.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:24 am |
    • DaveinCincy

      Facts: Atheists and agnostics were found to be largely more disengaged in many areas of life than believers. They are less likely to be registered to vote (78 percent) than active-faith Americans (89 percent); to volunteer to help a non-church-related non-profit (20 percent vs. 30 percent); to describe themselves as “active in the community” (41 percent vs. 68 percent); and to personally help or serve a homeless or poor person (41 percent vs. 61 percent).

      October 16, 2011 at 11:30 am |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      And one hundred percent of your statistics have no source. What is your source for these numbers, honey? You can post anything and pretend it has some basis in fact-I can say that 55 percent of an evangelical's brain is mush. That doesn't make it true. Produce your sources.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:33 am |
    • E

      OMGZ he is listing numbers! Those must be facts!! Oh wait, there is not mention of who supplied the numbers....

      October 16, 2011 at 11:34 am |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      Of course there isn't. Anti choice factions love to cite 'statistics' they find on the nrlc website and pretend they are quoting an independent, neutral source. Davey's doing the same thing.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:37 am |
    • Caryn

      So I guess the time that my husband and I spent yesterday volunteering at a fund-raising event for a center for developmentally disabled adults means nothing, because we're both atheists. Do you actually know any atheists, or are you just spouting whatever thoughts come into your hateful brain?

      October 16, 2011 at 11:47 am |
    • Credenza

      Dave Cincy – Unlike the Atheist trolls – you present impressive facts to support your argument. Congratulations on 2 great comments here. Thanks, and respect to you, Sir.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:53 am |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      What "facts", Credenza? He posted a bunch of numbers with absolutely no citation. And you're so dumb you think that is "great".

      Moron.

      October 16, 2011 at 12:01 pm |
  16. James

    Religion requires shutting down reason and logic, it is a form of mental sickness. Religious people are very dangerous, just study the "Dark Ages" when the Christians ruled the world. Most methods of torture were invented by the "Christian Church", how much more evidence does one need to declare these people 'dangerous'?

    October 16, 2011 at 11:17 am |
  17. Pey

    Yes. As dangerous as the Taliban. Did you all know that in most evangelical churches you first pledge allegiance to the Bible, THEN, the United States of America? Their true loyalties are with this countryONLY if they can change it to a Christian state.

    October 16, 2011 at 11:17 am |
    • DaveinCincy

      ...and what beliefs do you think the US was founded on? Read a little history..don't be lazy.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:20 am |
    • roshinobi

      You do realize God comes before country in the Pledge of Allegiance, right?

      October 16, 2011 at 11:27 am |
    • chrisg

      Kinda like the repubs pledging to Norquist first then to the American people

      October 16, 2011 at 11:28 am |
    • Pete

      @Dave – you are of course right Dave, however the founding fathers were foresighted enough to state that the right to practice or not practice a religion was a fundamental tenet of the state.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:32 am |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      Dave in Cincy, you are full of it. The nation wasn't founded on Christian ideals but on ideals that are nearly universal in nature and are not exclusive to Christianity.

      Nice try, revisionist.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:35 am |
    • James

      After spending some time working for the US Gov in the middle-east, I can assure you that all these Abrahamic faiths are horribly dangerous, I would list the current order of threat as Judaism, Muslim, and Christian. All of which have no problem murdering the others, just look at those banging the drum wars the hardest here in the USA; Christians and Jewish people, wanting more and more wars against any country not Christian or Jewish. Dangerous warmongers? Absolutely! Are they essentially anti-American freedom and liberty? Absolutely? The "War on Drugs" is entirely their policy, they have given us a Police State in exchange for our Republic. Are they dangerous one asks? Ask the millions of people whose lives they destroyed! Ask all the young people, who were sent to prison for assuming they owned their own body, rather than the State owning them. Who do they have to thank for the hell they are receiving here on Earth? Religious people! Religious people work to create hell for anyone who is not a member of their particular delusion.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:35 am |
  18. Erick

    The 'our way or no way' religions of the world (those which give rise to fanaticism-Christianity being chief among them) have been poisoning, subjugating, and destroying civilizations for millenia. I think that more than answers the question of whether evangelicals are dangerous. Anyone who invents a God to legitimize their inhumanity has the potential of being most dangerous indeed. The past and the present continue to teach us this..we only need to pay attention!

    October 16, 2011 at 11:16 am |
  19. jr

    I recently viewed an Evangelical television program that was billed as an informative look at Mormonism. Who did they get to "explain" Mormonism to their viewers? A noted anti-Mormon speaker with the perfect lineage to press their point. I believe they knowingly misrepresented basic tenets of the Mormon faith out of fear that their flock might begin to question the frequent anti-Mormon Sunday School lessons. Although I am sure they are good people, their actions are often somewhat hateful and judgmental. That's why people worry. Why can't all believers unite in an effort to relieve suffering throughout the world? I believe that is what Christ expects of His disciples.

    October 16, 2011 at 11:15 am |
    • Pete

      jr, people are just people – even news organizations often push a political agenda be it left or right – admittedly some are more balanced than others. The people who generally watch evangelical TV are in the main, evangelicals, and get the same message from a variety of sources anyway. Those who espouse a particular view want to propagate it – so you can hardly expect your channel to be flattering to Mormons can you?

      October 16, 2011 at 11:22 am |
  20. Nick Naranja

    I would prefer to keep my religion and my government separate.

    October 16, 2011 at 11:15 am |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      As would any sane person.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:37 am |
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