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My Take: Are evangelicals dangerous?
Many evangelicals want to ban abortion, but does that mean they want theocracy?
October 15th, 2011
10:00 PM ET

My Take: Are evangelicals dangerous?

Editor's Note: R. Albert Mohler, Jr., is president of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, the flagship school of the Southern Baptist Convention and one of the largest seminaries in the world.

By R. Albert Mohler, Jr., Special to CNN

Here we go again.

Every four years, with every new presidential election cycle, public voices sound the alarm that the evangelicals are back. What is so scary about America’s evangelical Christians?

Just a few years ago, author Kevin Phillips told intellectual elites to run for cover, claiming that well-organized evangelicals were attempting to turn America into a theocratic state. In “American Theocracy,” Phillips warned of the growing influence of Bible-believing, born-again, theologically conservative voters who were determined to create a theocracy.

Writer Michelle Goldberg, meanwhile, has warned of a new Christian nationalism, based in “dominion theology.” Chris Hedges topped that by calling conservative Christians “American fascists.”

And so-called New Atheists like Richard Dawkins and Sam Harris claim that conservative Christians are nothing less than a threat to democracy. They prescribe atheism and secularism as the antidotes.

This presidential cycle, the alarms have started earlier than usual. Ryan Lizza, profiling Rep. Michele Bachmann for The New Yorker, informed his readers that “Bachmann belongs to a generation of Christian conservatives whose views have been shaped by institutions, tracts, and leaders not commonly known to secular Americans, or even to most Christians.”

Change just a few strategic words and the same would be true of Barack Obama or any other presidential candidate. Every candidate is shaped by influences not known to all and by institutions that other Americans might find strange.

What stories like this really show is that the secular elites assume that their own institutions and leaders are normative.

The New Yorker accused Bachmann of being concerned with developing a Christian worldview, ignoring the fact that every thinking person operates out of some kind of worldview. The article treated statements about wifely submission to husbands and Christian influence in art as bizarre and bellicose.

When Rick Perry questioned the theory of evolution, Dawkins launched into full-on apoplexy, wondering aloud how anyone who questions evolution could be considered intelligent, even as polls indicate that a majority of Americans question evolution.

Bill Keller, then executive editor of The New York Times, topped all the rest by seeming to suggest that conservative Christians should be compared to those who believe in space aliens. He complained that “when it comes to the religious beliefs of our would-be presidents, we are a little squeamish about probing too aggressively.”

Really? Earlier this month, comedian Penn Jillette - a well–known atheist - wrote a very serious op-ed complaining of the political influence of “bugnut Christians,” in the pages of The Los Angeles Times, no less. Detect a pattern here?

By now, this is probably being read as a complaint against the secular elites and prominent voices in the mainstream media. It’s not.

If evangelicals intend to engage public issues and cultural concerns, we have to be ready for the scrutiny and discomfort that comes with disagreement over matters of importance. We have to risk being misunderstood - and even misrepresented - if we intend to say anything worth hearing.

Are evangelicals dangerous? Well, certainly not in the sense that more secular voices warn. The vast majority of evangelicals are not attempting to create a theocracy, or to oppose democracy.

To the contrary, evangelicals are dangerous to the secularist vision of this nation and its future precisely because we are committed to participatory democracy.

As Christians committed to the Bible, evangelicals have learned to advocate on behalf of the unborn, believing that every single human being, at every stage of development, is made in God’s image.

Evangelicals worry about the fate of marriage and the family, believing that the pattern for human relatedness set out in Scripture will lead to the greatest human flourishing.

We are deeply concerned about a host of moral and cultural issues, from how to address poverty to how to be good stewards of the earth, and on some of these there is a fairly high degree of disagreement even among us.

Above all, evangelicals are those who believe that Jesus Christ is Lord and are most concerned about telling others about Jesus. Most of America’s evangelical Christians are busy raising their children, working to support their families and investing energy in their local churches.

But over recent decades, evangelical Christians have learned that the gospel has implications for every dimension of life, including our political responsibility.

We’re dangerous only to those who want more secular voices to have a virtual monopoly in public life.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of R. Albert Mohler, Jr.

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Christianity • Opinion • Politics

soundoff (5,318 Responses)
  1. tready

    Just a thought here, but if you don't believe in religion of any kind, why are you reading the "Belief Blog". Do you live in such a negative place that you have to come here and try to bait total strangers into arguments? I, for one, never read anything from Fox News because I don't agree with them and readers, for the most part, are not interested in logical debate. You unbelieving commenters are not here to debate to criticize and ridicule. There is a lot I believe in but being able to change the mind of the arrogantly ignorant is not one of them.

    October 16, 2011 at 10:13 pm |
    • Central Scrutinizer

      Show me yours and I will show you mine.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:25 pm |
    • God Illusion

      Let me answer that. Atheists and agnostics read Belief blog and comment on the nonsense written there, simply because religion is a poison in America and in the World. Until people, in the name of religion, stop flying planes into buildings, committing atrocities, dressing women in cloth bags, blocking stem cell research, fighting a woman's right to choose, discriminating against gays, holding back sensible contraception measure in Africa to prevent the spread of aids, abusing small boys, etc. etc. then it is beholden upon grown up people to monitor this cancer and speak out against it.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:25 pm |
    • normalice

      it was on the front page.

      plus, i may not have an open mind about religion, but I have an open mind about religious people.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:27 pm |
    • Richard Kaiser

      @ tready et al,,

      The 'crowds' in here move at lightening speeds and most are lost by Time while the fragmented few do in diligent behaviorisms ever remain. I am one.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:31 pm |
    • Central Scrutinizer

      @tready
      I am waiting.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:32 pm |
    • Richard Kaiser

      God Illusion wrote,,, "Let me answer that. Atheists and agnostics read Belief blog and comment on the nonsense written there, simply because religion is a poison in America and in the World"

      Without religion the poisonous prey of right winged atheism and left handed secularism would sting the 'begeesims' out of many childish pranksters who know not what they do but flout out anyways. 🙂

      October 16, 2011 at 10:40 pm |
    • No, I'm the best.

      Dicky dear, there is no such word as "anyways".

      October 16, 2011 at 10:42 pm |
    • Richard Kaiser

      No, I'm the best. wrote on Sunday, October 16, 2011 at 10:42 pm, stating, "Dicky dear, there is no such word as "anyways"."

      If that is yout best 'shot', i'll play with your thingamabob any day! Any day cept Monday or Tuesday or Wednesday or Thursday or Friday or Saturday or Sunday. What day is convenient for you" 🙂

      October 16, 2011 at 10:49 pm |
    • God Illusion

      Thank you Richard for reducing this discussion to a 4th grade level – only in America. I'll leave this thread with the final comment that maybe next time CNN should ask the head of the KKK if he thinks "racists are dangerous" with no following counterpoint argument. Belief Blog is descending into the absurd and the only place to find any true discourse is in the follow up forums – where I am heartened to see the realists outnumber the sheep by a good 8 to 1.

      October 16, 2011 at 11:05 pm |
  2. David

    You might as well ask, "Is the taliban dangerous?" Because the answer is the same. Religious wingnuts (not all religious people, just the extremists) of any variety are dangerous. This includes those who profess to follow Christ without following his call to love thy neighbor as thyself. (Which is most of them.)

    October 16, 2011 at 10:11 pm |
    • tom clements

      Every Evangelical Christian will profess that they are a sinner. As a matter of fact that is precisely why we need a savior.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:26 pm |
    • normalice

      I've found that evangelical Christians only profess themselves to be sinners because they feel professing it makes them better than those who do not profess it. Rarely do they actually behave as unworthy as they claim to be.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:30 pm |
    • tom clements

      Normalice...I can only speak for myself, If I woke up this morning and told myself a thousand times not to lose my temper, fight with my teenager, argue with my wife...whatever the sin may be...I am still going to do these things. I can't get through a single day without screwing up somehow. Its pretty easy for me to know that I will never be worthy, on my own, to be in the presence of a Perfect God. It doesn't even take that much soul searching to realize that we are all in the same boat.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:48 pm |
  3. hez316

    "Above all, evangelicals are those who believe that Jesus Christ is Lord and are most concerned about telling others about Jesus" I thought this was the definition of a Christian. If this is what an "evangelical" is, then aren't all Christians evangelicals. Not sure how you can claim to be a Christian and not be an evangelical according to this definition.

    October 16, 2011 at 10:10 pm |
    • tom clements

      The difference between Christians and Evangelicals is pretty simple. I grew up Catholic in a great supportive community with other Catholic Families, however we never would talk to a neighbor or heaven forbid a stranger about the Catholic Faith. However, later in life I moved to a Christian Church. We are taught that the gift of God's grace is so joyous you can't not talk about it. I much prefer the simple Joy of knowing that Christ died for my sins because He loves me, other than trying to determine all of the tenents of the Catholic Faith.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:38 pm |
  4. S1N

    When I went to college, I knew a group of highly intelligent, well-spoken evangelical Christians who actually knew (and were willing to discuss) their religion in great detail, without all the "fire and brimstone" tactics to atheists, such as myself, who they knew had no intention of converting.

    Why is it that I have been unable to find a single sane, well spoken evangelical since? In what year did stupidity infect the vast majority of these people? Was the group I knew just a fluke?

    October 16, 2011 at 10:10 pm |
    • S1N

      This was only 2001. It wasn't THAT long ago.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:11 pm |
    • normalice

      That's odd. All of the Christians I could stand talking to I met in college too. huh.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:36 pm |
    • tom clements

      Maybe you hang around to many atheist?

      October 16, 2011 at 10:41 pm |
  5. Lauren Thomas

    If you don't like allowing others the right to decide how to live and you can't go on about your business without dictating to them, then leave.

    Aren't you talking to yourself Tom? You elitist libtards are just as bad

    October 16, 2011 at 10:07 pm |
  6. Louis Faihild

    we are not animals; stop acting like chickens.
    time to vote
    1. Follow Jesus now and be wrong when you die
    or
    2. Don't follow Jesus now and be wrong when you die

    October 16, 2011 at 10:07 pm |
    • S1N

      1. Follow Mohamed now and be wrong when you die.
      2. Don't follow Mohamed now and be wrong when you die.

      Alternatively,

      1. Follow Buddha and be wrong when you die.
      2. Don't follow Buddha and be wrong when you die.

      OR

      1. Have a good time, don't worry about a magic man in the sky, and actually ENJOY your life without fear of a postmortem boogieman.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:13 pm |
    • Richard Kaiser

      I'll take door number 3, please,,,, WHAT? No door number 3? It's rigged, I knew it was a hoax!!!!! 🙂

      October 16, 2011 at 10:18 pm |
    • Louis Faihild

      Sadly, we all have choice. We all ought to follow Jesus, since we all know he is Lord. But we are not all responsible. Our choice has doomed us. We should have been robots.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:18 pm |
    • Richard Kaiser

      @ Louis Faihild

      We all are following the Lord Christ Jesus in all our ways we are doing His will. Even the beggar and even the millionare. No one is not following Christ for, we all carry the cross of death. Until mankind finds the holy grail of living forever we are doomed to the deadening of Life.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:25 pm |
    • Central Scrutinizer

      @Richard
      Are you Five? What is with the happy faces. Good lord.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:31 pm |
    • normalice

      don't feed the trolls

      October 16, 2011 at 10:41 pm |
    • sigmundfreud

      You left out the third choice: the realization that you are peddling ancient fairy tales.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:46 pm |
    • No, I'm the best.

      Louis, we do NOT all "know" that. In fact we KNOW it's a fallacy, and basically an outdate, meaningless phrase. Also we do NOT have free will. That's also been debunked. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fI1624SwYnI

      October 16, 2011 at 10:47 pm |
    • tallulah13

      Louis, humans are indeed animals. Though I suspect that you are more a troll.

      October 17, 2011 at 3:11 am |
  7. Joseph

    It is ironic how much filth from the "so-called" open minded, tolerant leftist secularists are being spewed here. You can all hate the religious as much as you want, but the more hate you spill, the less support you have. As an atheist myself, I just kinda roll my eyes at what the religious write on here (It's what I expect from them), but you guys are the ones that scare me.

    Democracy is about PEOPLE'S GOVERNMENT. Each individual has a right to support, protest, and vote based on their beliefs on how society and government should function. You may think they are nuts, but they have a right to vote that way even if you disagree. But when you resort to name calling and hate filled anti-democratic threats and retoric, you discredit yourself and your cause.

    Sorry, but I stand unconvinced. ~ Atheist Republican

    October 16, 2011 at 10:05 pm |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      Gosh, I'm just ever so impressed. However WILL I recover from your disapproval?

      Look up tyranny of the majority, JoeBlow.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:07 pm |
    • Lisa

      Democracy is about representative government. Check out the definition.

      Don't feel bad – it's a commonly mistake. Media today doesn't do much toward informing our citizens so they don't even understand what democracy is. Many of the GOP Presidential candidates don't know this either though sad as that is.

      Meaning, all are represented.

      These so-called conservatives would have the government dictate law to all citizens, regardless of faith, based on their interpretation of morality and ethics.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:08 pm |
    • Lauren Thomas

      Well said Joseph. Liberal elites are the worst. They never have tolerance for anything unless it's anti-american, anti-capitalistic, anti-white and anti-christian. they are seriously horrible. one step away from socialism

      October 16, 2011 at 10:09 pm |
    • *frank*

      Evangelists deserve all the respect they afford others–i.e., zero.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:10 pm |
    • S1N

      Nah. Socialism is a good thing. Just look at modern Germany, France, England, and the vast majority of Western Europe. Socialism has done great there. Hell, the ones that AREN'T doing so well are due primarily to their lack of banking regulations and tax code enforcement. In other words, the elements of free market capitalism in their societies.

      I, however, am NOT a good person. If Satan were real, I would drink a beer with him, before we go pick up girls for some drunken partying. He sounds like a really fun guy. I am also a firm supporter of exterminating stupid people.

      See. Socialism = good. Me = bad. They are worlds apart.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:17 pm |
    • normalice

      The allure and organization of religion gives it a natural political advantage. People are free to think whatever they want, true – but the one exception is that people should not feel free to think they have the authority to tell others what to think. Unfortunately, 'telling others what to think' is deeply ingrained into the christian religion.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:21 pm |
    • normalice

      Combined with the natural political edge that religions have in a democracy, and the risk is legislation based on religious doctrine.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:22 pm |
    • normalice

      It is simply not fair to impose relative morals (like going to church on sunday) on people who have no interest.

      I've said nothing here, so far, that I really think you would disagree with. This might be something you would disagree with though: the problem is that it has been this way since the beginning of this country, so there is already Christian influence in our legislation. Every time some so-called 'liberal' comes along and tries to remove a little bit of it, the Christians panic – when really, all they are trying to do is bring things closer to neutrality!

      October 16, 2011 at 10:23 pm |
    • kari

      Actually Lisa, a republic is a representative government. Check out the definition and educate yourself please before lecturing others.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:25 pm |
    • SWalkerTTU

      An atheist Repubilcan? I wasn't aware such a thing existed any more. I'll lay odds that inside of two years, you're an atheist independent.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:45 pm |
  8. Just Wow

    Wow. The thing that bothers me the most about the evangelicals is that they want to indoctrinate us all to their view. Our country was founded "One Nation Under God" but you, the individua,l get to choose your God, or not. The people that came here from Europe came to get away from religious intolerance and condemnation. Funny how we have forgotten that along the way. I am a Christian but I'm not an evangelical and I do not subscribe to their doctrine. I shouldn't have to. And furthermore, we are supposed to have separation of church and state so their is no business for religion in politics. It simply does not belong. Period.

    October 16, 2011 at 10:04 pm |
  9. Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

    Louis, when are you going to tell everyone where you got your doctorate? You challenged another poster to tell you. Don't be shy.

    October 16, 2011 at 10:04 pm |
    • Louis Faihild

      I got my doctorate from the same place every other true Christian got their's. From Jesus.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:05 pm |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      Stands to reason that you got it from an inferior source that didn't teach you how to create plurals or use apostrophes correctly.

      You're a chucklehead.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:09 pm |
    • Louis Faihild

      To Tom,
      are you actually alive? I think you may be a computer. i know you are a slave, but I think you are a computer. do you want to be a human? i may be able to help.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:13 pm |
    • Central Scrutinizer

      Louis, good lord man, how many times do I have to explain to you the people die. Jesus (if he lived) died a really long time ago. Your are really creaping me out.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:15 pm |
    • Central Scrutinizer

      @tom tom
      Sorry for the type-os. Don't rip me. I am trying to watch football and fight evil at the same time.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:16 pm |
    • SWalkerTTU

      @Central Sympathizer: It's not effective to fight evil and contribute to it at the same time (by watching gridiron; I won't disparage the term by calling it "football").

      October 16, 2011 at 10:47 pm |
    • Central Scrutinizer

      @swalkettusmelly
      I am SO OFFENDED. HOW DARE you! Football is our national religion!! Blasphemy!

      October 16, 2011 at 10:52 pm |
  10. Jerrywayne

    For some reason, secularism is now being equated with atheism. In truth, secularism is merely thought that limits itself to what can be known of the world via scientific methodology and human reason. It proposes ideas and policies in the political realm that are theoretically transparent to all folks and parties and able to foster consensus agreement.

    This secular ideal will always have a tension with faith-based ideologies. The faith-based communities are examples of
    closed societies that have their own realities. Such communities dismiss secular openness and consensus as knowingly corrupt by the fall of man, a belief held, naturally, on faith.

    October 16, 2011 at 10:03 pm |
  11. Louis Faihild

    Follow Jesus now and be wrong when you die.
    Don't follow Jesus now and be wrong when you die.
    The polls are open. Voting begins now...

    October 16, 2011 at 10:03 pm |
    • Just Wow

      Well Louis, if you are wrong whether or not you follow Jesus, as you have just stated, why do you have your panties in such a twist? You are a prime example of why religion has no business in politics. It just muddies up the water.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:08 pm |
    • Louis Faihild

      Sorry you didn't understand the post. I don't have time to explain it.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:11 pm |
    • S1N

      He was attempting to invoke Pascal's wager. For anyone that knows Pascal's wager, there are MANY arguments against it. The two most prominent are the Problem of False Belief and the Problem of Inconsistent Revelation.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:26 pm |
    • No, I'm the best.

      It's Pascal's Wager. Louis you are about 300 years too late on that one.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:48 pm |
  12. Bill

    The word "evangelical" as it is used today can not be used in a New Testament Christian sense. It's use is filled with politics and the self-righteousness of main line religious leaders who are sworn to be "politicially correct." They abuse the Word of God to fit or please the flesh. When a real evangelical preaches the truth of God's Word he will not have a large following or pastor a mega-church or be asked his opinion about anything.

    October 16, 2011 at 10:03 pm |
  13. normalice

    I don't understand how Christians can get away with pretending they are the victims of persecution. That's just such a pompous and naive idea to take up. They are the vast majority (in this country, anyway). They are doing the persecuting.

    October 16, 2011 at 10:01 pm |
  14. normalice

    "Above all, evangelicals are those who believe that Jesus Christ is Lord and are most concerned about telling others about Jesus."
    See, this is the problem with evangelicalism. Your freedom of speech does not mean you get to harass me with your theories about Jesus any time you want.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:58 pm |
    • martinipaul

      Change the channel, then. What is there about freedom of speech do you not understand? Take your soapbox, go down to the public square and insult 80% of your audience. See how far it gets you. That's why militant atheists love the internet, no one can tell them to shut the hell up.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:04 pm |
    • tom clements

      Albert really is harassing you to the point where you had to comment about his statements. He seemed pretty repsectful to me and you had the freedom to ignore his article if you wanted.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:10 pm |
  15. zip

    Do you know what the difference is between Christian fundamentalists and Muslim fundamentalists?? Neither do I.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:57 pm |
    • tom clements

      You asked the question...Christian Fundamentalist believe that no matter how hard we try we can never be good enough, on our own, to be in the presence of a perfect God. Therefore, God sent his son as a sacrifice so that with the shedding of his blood we may be saved. Jesus is our Savior, no one gets to the Father except through Him. One must put their trust and faith in Jesus Christ if they want to spend eternity with the Father. Muslim Fundamentalist believe that through your own behavior, you may be judged worthy of being in God's Grace. That 's it in a nutshell.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:17 pm |
  16. God Save Us

    God save us all from God! If every fundamentalist evangelical was at least a real Christian, the world would be a better place. If they really lived by the principles that Christ preached... but, what I see is only BS coming from them. For starters, how come someone can say he is a Christian and be in favor of the death penalty? Please be coherent... Interesting also that the vast majority of pro-life (like Rick Perry) are also pro-Death-Penalty. Please be coherent. At least secularism and atheism are consistent. God save us from God.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:57 pm |
    • Louis Faihild

      I know you know Jesus is God, but you do not follow Him. If you followed Him, you would understand the Bible, and you could quote it, which I could do too, but you are not open. You see being a Christian and not believing in the death penalty as synonymous; you are wrong. Sorry. Fail.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:59 pm |
    • hez316

      Not so sure secularism is so consistent. Very important that everyone has their rights protected unless you happen to disagree with their position or you're unborn, then your rights aren't so important.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:02 pm |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      If you're not born, you don't HAVE rights under the law, witless wonderboy.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:05 pm |
    • Fundie

      @Louis Faihild:

      Personally, I oppose the death penalty for purely theological reasons: It denies the person to be executed a chance to accept Jesus and thus risks sending someone straight to hell.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:09 pm |
    • john

      Louis, you say you understand the bible? Just curious... you said 'Jesus is God'??? which passage did you read to draw that conclusion. Because you certainly have not considered the overall context!! If Jesus was here now he would have to argue with you, like he had to with the Jewish leaders in his day (John 10) that wanted to stone him! They claimed he was making himself a god he said NO I am not claiming to be God I am claiming to be "God's Son" !! God had no beginning Jesus did!! (John 3:16, Col 1:15,16, Rev 3:14) that is why he could say "the father is greater than I am" & God himself had to exalt Jesus to "a superior position" (Phil 2:9) Jeus didn't exalt himself & certainly never claimed to be part of a God head!

      October 16, 2011 at 10:27 pm |
    • Ralph

      @Louis Faihild: “You see being a Christian and not believing in the death penalty as synonymous; you are wrong.”

      Boy that’s a fact. The bible pays lip service to thou shalt not kill in a few places; but, most of the first 5 books is all about gods people killing other people because god told them to

      October 20, 2011 at 7:49 pm |
  17. Louis Faihild

    OK, since I know all of you know Jesus is God already, though not all of you are following Him, I will ask this. Which is safer, to follow Jesus now and be wrong when you die, or to not follow Jesus now and be wrong when you die?

    October 16, 2011 at 9:55 pm |
    • dsavio

      Which is safer, to pray to our alien overlords now, or in 50 years when they destroy our cities and take over the world?

      Which is safer, lighting a fire on christmas and risking burning Santa Claus to death, or not lighting a fire and freezing to death yourself?

      October 16, 2011 at 10:04 pm |
    • S1N

      Don't even bother with Pascal's wager. Do you HONESTLY think that if your God exists, that he will allow me to lie and SAY I believe in him, when I really do not, and that he won't care about the difference? You cannot force yourself to believe in something that you "know" is utter fantasy and idiocy.

      False belief is worse than not believing at all. At least be honest with yourself. I, for one, do not believe in God, and cannot force myself to do so based solely on some idiotic "what if" scenario?

      However, since we're going to play this game, what about those that believe in other religions, such as Hinduism or Buddhism? They have also discovered the "right" way to believe in a higher power.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:04 pm |
    • Lisa

      You speak for everyone, eh? Hmmm.. what does the Bible have to say about arrogance again?

      October 16, 2011 at 10:11 pm |
    • Fundie

      @S1N:

      "Do you HONESTLY think that if your God exists, that he will allow me to lie and SAY I believe in him, when I really do not, and that he won't care about the difference? "

      Well, part of the Christian belief is the concept of free will. Namely, God will tolerate people choosing to do things that he disapproves of. So yes, God does allow you to lie. This doesn't meant that there won't be consequences, though.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:11 pm |
    • tallulah13

      That's the entire point, Fundie. What Louis suggested is foolish because it is advocating a lie.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:56 pm |
    • Ralph

      @Lisa: ” what does the Bible have to say about arrogance”. Good question, my turn. What does the bible say about ince$t? Hint check out the final pages of the story about the destruction of Sodom and Gomorra. If you don’t already know the answer, it’s worth checking out

      October 20, 2011 at 7:53 pm |
  18. normalice

    millions of years of human culture and we're still considering religion real? Not only real, but we still have people inventing defenses for forcing it on people? We're supposed to be the premier learning species, I thought. How is this happening so slowly?

    October 16, 2011 at 9:54 pm |
    • SWalkerTTU

      "Millions of years"? Don't you know the Earth is only about 6,000 years old?

      ::sarcasm off::

      Really, though, it's only about 250,000 years.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:50 pm |
    • Ralph

      @Louis Faihild: “I just wanted to say thank you, again, to all of you who believe that Jesus is God. I know you all do, but some of you are afraid to come out of the closet”. Typical delusional Christian, convincing himself of the most outlandish fantasies without any evidence

      October 20, 2011 at 7:58 pm |
  19. Louis Faihild

    I just wanted to say thank you, again, to all of you who believe that Jesus is God. I know you all do, but some of you are afraid to come out of the closet. Don't be afraid! Come on out. We'll welcome you!

    October 16, 2011 at 9:53 pm |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      Why would I want to be a member of your little club? I don't like you and I don't like what you bray or stand for.

      October 16, 2011 at 9:58 pm |
    • Louis Faihild

      But since you already believe Jesus is God, how hard is it to take the next step and follow Him? You're already half way there!

      October 16, 2011 at 10:01 pm |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      I don't believe any such thing, since I don't believe there IS a god, you moron.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:02 pm |
    • normalice

      don't feed the trolls, please...

      October 16, 2011 at 10:02 pm |
    • Louis Faihild

      It's ok Tom, I know it's hard to admit what you know to be true sometimes. I sympathize. But if you just admit it, I'll send you a box of cross shaped candies.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:05 pm |
    • tallulah13

      Louis, I believe you are delusional. I welcome you to visit a mental health care specialist in your area.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:57 pm |
  20. Rob

    The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King was an Evangelical Christian. He believed that the Bible is true and inspired of God. He used the Scriptures as a moral basis for fighting segregation. Based on all the comments below today, was it wrong for President Obama for honoring him today and dedicating his memorial?

    October 16, 2011 at 9:52 pm |
    • Fundie

      And Since MLK III mentioned it... there is Scriptural basis for wealth redistribution as well. Try Leviticus 25.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:06 pm |
    • Adam B. Embry

      According to David J. Garrow’s Pulitzer Prize winning MLK biography, Bearing the Cross: Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, MLK was not an evangelical. He was a liberal Protestant. MLK followed Niebuher and Rauschenbusch, neither of whom were evangelicals. MLK was not an evangelical Protestant.

      October 16, 2011 at 10:18 pm |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.