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Study: Some atheists with children attend religious services
December 7th, 2011
06:00 AM ET

Study: Some atheists with children attend religious services

By Dan Merica, CNN

Washington (CNN) – Nearly one in five atheist scientists with children involve their families with religious institutions, even if they personally do not agree with the institutions teachings, a recent study says.

The study, conducted by Rice University and the University at Buffalo, found that these scientists affiliate with churches for both social and personal reasons. Additionally, the scientists indicated a strong desire to prepare their children to make educated decisions about their personal religious preference.

“This was so surprising to us just because of all of the public discussion about the ways in which scientists are very against religions people,” said Elaine Howard Ecklund, a sociologist at Rice. “When in fact, those we might most expect to be against religious people are sitting alongside them.”

Study participants also indicated they were involved in a religious institution because of the religious preferences of a spouse or partner.

One of the most interesting findings, according to Ecklund, was that some atheist scientists want to expose their children to religion due to scientific reasoning.

"We thought that these individuals might be less inclined to introduce their children to religious traditions, but we found the exact opposite to be true," Ecklund said. "They want their children to have choices, and it is more consistent with their science identity to expose their children to all sources of knowledge."

Ecklund said there were cases in which survey respondents identified that not only did they introduce their children to one church, but they also attended other religious services in the hope that the children would better understand each denomination.

"I think that understanding how nonreligious scientists utilize religion in family life demonstrates the important function they have in the U.S.," Ecklund said.

Sociologist Kristen Schultz Lee of University of Buffalo co-authored the study, which can be found in the December issue of the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion.

The data was pulled from a survey of 2,198 tenured or tenure-track faculty at 21 U.S. research universities. Around half of survey respondents identified a form of religious identity, while the other half did not.

- Dan Merica

Filed under: Atheism • Church • Culture & Science

soundoff (2,129 Responses)
  1. ss

    From the CNN front page "Is that an atheist on your church pew?" Really, "your church pew"???? how can anyone be possessive of a church or it's pews, makes no sense and goes completely against christian ideals. And why is it assumed in so many of these responses that it is the wives dragging the husbands to church? For being such smart, free thinking non religious people some of you are making some silly comments.
    I have decided not to take my children to church because I do not believe that I can give them equal chances to learn about other religions and therefore will have biased their decisions. Now that they are 14 and 9 I am finding that they are probably too far down the non religious road to ever believe in any of the really out their concepts that require blind faith.

    December 7, 2011 at 9:01 am |
    • MarkinFL

      Statistically, women are FAR more likely to attend church and are much more likely to be the motivator for family attendance. Simply a well known social phenomenon. Doesn't mean ONLY women, just much more likely.
      I try to teach our kids about Christianity and Judaism the most since the have the most day to day impact in our society and encourage any opportunity to learn about Muslim, Hindu and other religions. We do not take them to church , but they have gone with friends on occasion. I doubt they will ever be believers, but who knows? If they do, I'll still love them... 🙂

      December 7, 2011 at 9:16 am |
    • ss

      There are places, even in America, where religion is used as means to oppress women and the men are the ones pushing attendance.

      December 7, 2011 at 9:51 am |
  2. joe

    Rather pathetic article. It just assumes that most "scientific athiests" are against religion. Just because someone disagrees with your belief doesn't mean they are against you. Perhaps the religious author of the this article and those quoted within it can remember that. As an athiest, I can say that most of us really couldn't care less what your beliefs are. The idea is we want to be free to believe nothing if that's our desire. If you want to believe something, go ahead, just don't let it affect me. And to me it's only rational that if you want to join a church, that you would explore not only many demoninations but many different faiths to see which one fits you as a person. Just going to the same one your parents go to isn't exactly making an informed choice.

    December 7, 2011 at 8:57 am |
    • Baptist_Deacon

      The problem is that the few illogical loud mouths are bigots, saying things about us that aren't true, like we are against science, etc.

      December 7, 2011 at 9:01 am |
    • Jason Kreegal

      I wish all atheists were a reasonable as you. I also with all religions were more tolerant.

      December 7, 2011 at 9:03 am |
    • Karen

      I have to agree with Baptist Deacon. A small vocal majority loves to tell "us" how stupid we are, and make claims like we don't subscribe to evolution. Let's be real, the majority of atheists AND people of faith are somewhere in the middle, and just want to be left alone with their beliefs.

      Calling somebody stupid over something you yourself will never be able to prove is just arrogant. And that's true of both sides in this argument.

      December 7, 2011 at 9:07 am |
    • Ironicus

      Actually, Karen, we have all the scientific proof in the world that your god does not exist, but that doesn't stop people from pretending we don't. You deny any proof is possible, right? And admit you have no proof right? Guess what? We have all the proof. All of it. All the proof that exists is proof against your deity's existence. That is rock solid proof we have!

      December 7, 2011 at 9:13 am |
    • Karen

      Ironicus I hope you're being sarcastic because if you're not that is the DUMBEST thing I've ever heard anyone say. The first thing you're taught in a college Biology or Chemistry course is that you need to always question the "truth" because what we know today will most likely be wrong tomorrow.

      December 7, 2011 at 9:17 am |
    • Karen

      And to add to that, being a Catholic at least is not about having this ridiculous blind sheeplike faith. For a lot of people it's a constant struggle to find. We ask a lot of questions, and Church (as in the service) is meant to help guide people to those answers. Don't think for one second I haven't had serious doubts, but faith isn't based on facts. And I'm not asking you to have it but I am asking you to stop being ignorant.

      December 7, 2011 at 9:20 am |
    • Ironicus

      Thanks, Karen, I don't often get someone who so blatantly refuses to face the truth of the sum of human knowledge, but, hey, that's what religious people are for, I guess. I sure don't have much use for you people otherwise.
      And at least you didn't quote scripture at me. I guess I'd have more luck talking to a wall.

      December 7, 2011 at 10:16 am |
    • Chris

      Ironicus... Read proof, and be free =)

      Rapid Rifting in Ethiopia Challenges Evolutionary Model by Brian Thomas, M.S.: http://www.icr.org/articles/view/5106/355/

      Continents Didn't Drift, They Raced by Brian Thomas, M.S.: http://www.icr.org/articles/view/5588/355/

      When Did the Mountains Rise? by John D. Morris, Ph.D.: http://www.icr.org/articles/view/103/355/

      Archaeopteryx Is a Bird. . . Again by Brian Thomas, M.S.: http://www.icr.org/article/6429/

      Evolution Is Biologically Impossible by Joseph Mastropaolo, Ph.D.: http://www.icr.org/article/evolution-biologically-impossible/

      Both Argon and Helium Diffusion Rates Indicate a Young Earth by Larry Vardiman, Ph.D.: http://www.icr.org/article/6229/

      What Magnetized the Moon? by Brian Thomas, M.S.: http://www.icr.org/articles/type/9/

      A Well-Watered Land: Effects of the Genesis Flood on Precipitation in the Middle East by Larry Vardiman, Ph.D.: http://www.icr.org/article/6091/

      'Dinosaur Plant' Evolution Stories Conflict by Brian Thomas, M.S.: http://www.icr.org/article/6433/

      The above mentioned ^^ are just the beginning... I can keep going if you'd like. But why don't you chew on those for a bit.

      December 8, 2011 at 4:27 pm |
  3. Joe from CT, not Lieberman

    How about this idea – Scientists, even atheists, are always looking for Truths. Any "Truth" is subjective based on how it is measured (as we are now finding with studies on Neutrinos). If they are searching for moral "Truth", why not go to a place that claims to be teaching that?
    For all out there who doubt, let me ask this: Is the purpose of a sermon to reaffirm the belief of the faithful, or to offer a suggestion to those who question their faith? I personally subscribe to the latter. After all, when the early Christians were trying to spread their faith their message had to be heard by those who initially did not "believe". If that had not been done, and the followers of Jesus of Nazareth only preached to themselves (i.e. the Faithful), they would have been another obscure sect of Judaism that died out in the late 8th or early 9th Century AUC. And if you don't get the AUC reference, then you lose the entire historical connection of the early Church.

    December 7, 2011 at 8:56 am |
    • Ironicus

      How about you start taking meds? That might help.

      December 7, 2011 at 9:14 am |
    • Randy

      Sermons can be directed at either, or, or both. Christians go to church for fellowship and learning. Even though many Christians think they know it all, they don't and they are fooling themselves and thinking too much of themselves. We need reminding and support.

      December 7, 2011 at 9:26 am |
  4. Andy

    Our church is awesome. I was not a church person when I started going there. It is a branch off of North Point Commununity church in GA. They have partners all over the US. It is for people who don't like church. We welcome athiests or anyone. It is very contemporary, great music, and a good message every week along with community groups. My kids love it. I will let them make up their own minds. I'm glad it isn't like the church I grew up being forced to go to.

    December 7, 2011 at 8:56 am |
  5. Baptist_Deacon

    While my parents are agnostics and not atheists, they also sent me to church when I was young. The influence from the church was positive, I am now a church deacon. I think most atheists want their children to make their own decisions about faith, just like my parents did. In spite of what you hear from a few illogical loud mouths, most churches are credible organizations and teach critical thinking, sound morality and, of course, about the most famous man that ever lived, Jesus Christ.

    December 7, 2011 at 8:56 am |
    • Ironicus

      "most churches are credible organizations and teach critical thinking, sound morality and, of course, about the most famous man that ever lived, Jesus Christ."
      LOL that is a huge lie. Why lie? Why not tell the truth? Why must you lie about it? Don't you think you can make a point without lying? Are you so insecure about your religion that you cannot simply tell the truth?

      December 7, 2011 at 9:17 am |
    • Jeffrey

      Ironicus you obviously know nothing of world religions. If you can't be bothered to learn about the things you feel so inclined to run your mouth about then nobody will ever attribute an ounce of credibility to you.

      The majority of people in this thread have been reasonable about expressing their thoughts without being nasty or self-righteous. Why can't you use that big brain of yours to make an actual contribution to the discussion?

      December 7, 2011 at 9:26 am |
    • Randy

      I believe it was an opinion being offered about Jesus, just as you are allowed your own opinion, Ironicus. No need to attack.

      December 7, 2011 at 9:38 am |
    • Ironicus

      How silly to spout nonsense and then get all huffy when I call you on it! A lie is a lie whether you believe it or not.
      When you want to speak intelligently and use honest statements to make your case, feel free. There's plenty of people here who can mop the floor with any thousand of you delusional cult members! I don't even have to be here. It only takes one person to show you to be wrong. And you are wrong. Hey, maybe your fake "god" wanted it that way. Ever think of that?

      December 7, 2011 at 11:52 am |
  6. Tim

    Atheists aren't 'against religious people'. Out of the mouth of a professional sociologist? Atheists don't subscribe to systems of belief and ritual centered around deities and dogma. Atheists are 'without religion'. Atheists aren't against anything.

    Looks like 20% of atheist scientists are smart enough to educate their children about the religions of the world. I'm surprised it's not 100% honestly. Atheists don't ignore religion, don't pretend it doesn't exists, and at least in my case, could care less that it exists. Keep it out of the courtroom and schools and hockey arenas etc. and I'm cool with it.

    Heck, you all might be right and maybe I'm wrong! Another non-story.

    December 7, 2011 at 8:55 am |
    • Veronica13

      You generalize. You cannot be a scientist.

      December 7, 2011 at 8:56 am |
    • Jason

      Veroncia, your arrogance is a really ugly attribute. Some of the world's greatest scientists have been people of one religion or another.

      Unlike you, many people can separate their faith from scientific study. Troll.

      December 7, 2011 at 9:11 am |
  7. hippypoet

    personally, everything at church can be taught from home and so there is no reason for ANYONE to go to church. But bringing my kids to church is a no go, if they want to go we can go once, after that, its up to them. I want them to understand that if they chose to buy into this crap that its all going to be ok and the devil isn't coming to steal your soul. I would explain that if the god of the bible is real then no building but the creation is the house of worship and so have no need to go off to pervert herd and ask forgiviness for YOUR sins while they plan there next ones out! But hey, why have an understanding of things around you when you too can be a sheep...YEAH! SOUNDS FUN! lets all go to church now! NOT!

    December 7, 2011 at 8:54 am |
  8. J

    I definitely don't believe in God, nor do I believe in going to church. I find that many who do go don't practice what they preach and try to instill these "beliefs" onto to those who don't follow any religion. These so-called do-gooders. Give me a break. I know of too many people who say they go to church, but yet do evil things on a daily basis–talk bad about people, try to get them fired, etc. It's endless. I think it's just a big sham and a way to brainwash those who can't see the difference between right from wrong, and to lure those in to donate money so that the preacher can live the high life. Take Joel Osteen, for example. He should be living modestly, but instead he lives in a multi-million dollar home. Shame on him. And, the way I see it, if God is the Almighty then he should be able to overtake the Devil himself and not allow the world to be where it is now. We have too many criminals, homeless families, abused children, etc. If God really cared for his "children" then none of us would be suffering.

    December 7, 2011 at 8:54 am |
  9. GodSmack

    Man made Religions be it Luthern, Babtist, Penacostal, Catolic or any other, are a disgrace to the true spirit of god

    December 7, 2011 at 8:54 am |
    • Veronica13

      You base this on anecdotal evidence, which we all know doesn't suffice. You should investigate on your own. There is much complexity to the people of these religions that you are far from understanding.

      December 7, 2011 at 8:58 am |
  10. woodofpine

    "Nearly one in five" – jeez – what's being tabulated here? Few prominant scientists consider themselves 'atheist', and probably fewer actually qualify as such. After all, atheism requires a LOT of faith (its almost spiritually oxymoronic). That scientists (even 'atheist' ones) are more open minded in actual family practice than 'true believers' hardly surprises me!

    December 7, 2011 at 8:53 am |
    • MarkinFL

      Atheism requires absolutely no faith. And scientists have a much higher rate of atheism than the general public.

      December 7, 2011 at 9:01 am |
    • Daniel

      Nope try again! Atheism is far from what you describe. I suggest QualiaSoup's youtube channel if you would like to be educated.

      December 7, 2011 at 9:07 am |
    • Jeff Williams

      Religious people are often so constrained by their personal viewpoint that it's difficult to understand an opposing view – hence the "faith" comment.

      It is as irrelevant and inaccurate as saying atheism is a "belief".

      December 7, 2011 at 9:27 am |
    • Chris

      Rapid Rifting in Ethiopia Challenges Evolutionary Model by Brian Thomas, M.S.: http://www.icr.org/articles/view/5106/355/

      Continents Didn't Drift, They Raced by Brian Thomas, M.S.: http://www.icr.org/articles/view/5588/355/

      When Did the Mountains Rise? by John D. Morris, Ph.D.: http://www.icr.org/articles/view/103/355/

      Archaeopteryx Is a Bird. . . Again by Brian Thomas, M.S.: http://www.icr.org/article/6429/

      Evolution Is Biologically Impossible by Joseph Mastropaolo, Ph.D.: http://www.icr.org/article/evolution-biologically-impossible/

      Both Argon and Helium Diffusion Rates Indicate a Young Earth by Larry Vardiman, Ph.D.: http://www.icr.org/article/6229/

      What Magnetized the Moon? by Brian Thomas, M.S.: http://www.icr.org/articles/type/9/

      A Well-Watered Land: Effects of the Genesis Flood on Precipitation in the Middle East by Larry Vardiman, Ph.D.: http://www.icr.org/article/6091/

      'Dinosaur Plant' Evolution Stories Conflict by Brian Thomas, M.S.: http://www.icr.org/article/6433/

      The above mentioned ^^ are just the beginning... I can keep going if you'd like. But this is a good start as to why "atheism" is a religion. Because it is a disbelief in a supernatural creator, which then leaves only one other option – Evolution is the main belief of most atheists, which takes an ENORMOUS amount of faith to believe in. Just read the above mentionted articles, and you'll start to see a little bit of what I mean.

      December 8, 2011 at 4:31 pm |
  11. ScottS

    iI am one of these persons. I don't tell my son that I am an atheist and have involved him in church (including weekly Sunday school). I want him to make an informed decision.

    Atheists (with a science world view) want to expose their children to all points of view.

    Religious conservatives want to outlaw teaching like evolution, etc, because they want to limit the points of view their kids have.

    Why would that be, religious conservatives? Perhaps because your views don't hold up well to thought and scrutiny like our viewpoint does?

    As an atheist, I am not afraid to let my child decide for himself. He's smart; I believe he'll see the same thing I do. But if he doesn't, even if he went as far as to become a priest, I would encourage and support him.

    December 7, 2011 at 8:52 am |
    • Wes

      The problem with people innocently thinking they are giving their children free choices while bringing them to church is this:

      Churches are not set up for free choices of thinking for children. Churches are set up to indoctrinate. There is a vast methodology of brainwashing children into believing myth as though it were fact. No credible rational thinker would raise their children in such a dangerous situation for a free mind.. without first understanding this practice of indoctrination. They must also let their child know the difference between delusion and reality.

      Another problem with this is that children do not have fully developed minds until they are 18 years old. So as a parent, one should be wise that there are sinister persons out there who wish to take advantage of this and force their "claims" upon them as though these claims are facts. U decide...it's your child's brain's future.

      December 7, 2011 at 9:01 am |
    • KF

      General comment: the science vs. religion thing is such a western, particularly Protestant phenomenon. Eastern Orthodoxy avoided this dichotomy from the beginning; God was considered a matter of belief, unprovable and "undisprovable." Truths and facts are seen as seperate things. Everything in the Bible is considered to be absolutely True, yet this doesn't mean that the world was literally created in seven days or that Eve was literally created out of Adam's rib. In the West arose this confusion of Truth with fact, and the concomitant idea of trying to "prove" the existence of God, which the Protestants have taken to the extreme and which is expressed in antiscientific Biblical literalism.

      Kudos to you, to expose your kids to Truths even if you do not believe them.

      December 7, 2011 at 9:17 am |
    • Pete the Ninja

      As a religious conservative, with a fairly scientific bent, I will be quick to acknowledge that the church has done a lot to make an image that it lacks credibility in 'intellectual circles', but that is certainly not the case. Furthermore, I find your asertion that Christianity doesn't hold up scrutiny, while your scientific bucket is apparantly leak proof interesting as you follow it up with you being OK with your smart child becoming a priest. You appear to say that christians can't withstand scrutiny, but its ok for your kid to be something that, to you, appears to be an overhwhelming fallacy...

      December 7, 2011 at 10:38 am |
  12. GodSmack

    Yes it's me! I'm waiting to vomit in the offering plate.

    December 7, 2011 at 8:52 am |
  13. lunchbreaker

    I'm an athiest and work down in the Bible belt. I have found it is much easier to smile and nod than to bring up being an athiest. Just mentioning the word brings up a discussion that I'm am tired of having. And sadly, I would be discriminated against. When people assume your on thier side they just let that bias hang out.

    December 7, 2011 at 8:52 am |
  14. David

    At the other end of the spectrum, I doubt if Creationists would take their children to a Natural History Museum as long as there is a Creation Museum, a Noah's Ark theme park and a Holy Land theme park to visit.

    December 7, 2011 at 8:51 am |
    • Scott

      IIndeed.

      It is not as if we believe our arguments are weak. We just get tired of arguing the same stuff over and over to people who have an illogical point of view to begin with.

      December 7, 2011 at 8:53 am |
    • SomeNoBody

      They get tons more exposure of evolution in public school where creationism isn't taught at all. So why need to bring them to Nature Museum. Have you thought about that before you posted?

      December 7, 2011 at 9:01 am |
  15. saywhat

    Just like how I was raised. Same way and I stayed an Atheist through and true.

    December 7, 2011 at 8:51 am |
  16. The atheists' real mistake

    The real problem surfaces when atheists don't expose their children to religion, bleating that they want to leave the choice to them later on in life. Whether they do or whether they don't, how are they supposed to choose when they know nothing about their choice?

    December 7, 2011 at 8:50 am |
    • Jeff Williams

      """The real problem surfaces when atheists don't expose their children to religion."""

      Where the heck do you live where children aren't automatically exposed to one religion or another?

      December 7, 2011 at 8:54 am |
    • Scott

      Atheists who don't expose their kids to religion are making a mistake. It's just like religious conservatives trying to stop the teaching of evolution –anything that limits knowledge is a bad thing.

      December 7, 2011 at 8:54 am |
    • MarkinFL

      I encourage our children to learn as much about religions as possible. Not so much for them to be able to choose to believe or not, though they are quite welcome to do so. Everyone needs to understand religion if they want to understand the motivations of religious people.

      December 7, 2011 at 9:03 am |
    • Selftaught

      did you even read the article. this is the entire point they are making. they expose their children to religion so they have a basis to make a choice.

      December 7, 2011 at 9:03 am |
    • Cedar Rapids

      My wife goes to church, so does my stepdaughter. However my young son does not go to church and I have told my wife he is not going to church until such time as he is old enough to understand critical thinking and to realise that not everything an adult tells him is automatically true or right. I am not going to let him get brainwashed at a young age when he knows no better.

      December 7, 2011 at 9:12 am |
    • Cathy

      Ignorance breeds hate.

      December 7, 2011 at 9:13 am |
  17. Ian

    Since when are "atheist" and "scientist" synonyms? If this study was of the subset of atheists that are also professional scientists, that's fine, but this article does very little to make that distinction. Not all scientists are atheists, and certainly not all atheists are trained scientists. I feel this is an important fact to keep in mind.

    December 7, 2011 at 8:50 am |
    • Scott

      II think it is because a lot of atheists have a science-based (e.g. provable observation based) world view. They may not be scientists by profession but they are scientists in terms of how they view the world.

      December 7, 2011 at 8:55 am |
    • MarkinFL

      The article is extremely clear that they are referencing atheist scientists, not all scientists. It continuously uses the term "atheist scientists".

      December 7, 2011 at 9:04 am |
  18. pat

    Years ago, I took a one-semester college course on evolution. On the last day of the course, the instructor, a PhD in biology, began to explain to the class that he has no personal conflict between his strong belief in the catholic faith and the theory of evolution. Go figure.

    December 7, 2011 at 8:47 am |
    • Michael Augustine

      He probably doesn't have a problem combining Catholicism and evolution. However, he might have a problem combining the actual text of the Bible with evolution. Part of the Catholic concept is that the Church determines doctrine, so the influence of social thought has it's sway. (Can be a double-edged sword.)

      December 7, 2011 at 8:52 am |
    • MarkinFL

      Catholics priests did a lot of the original work that shed light on genetics.

      December 7, 2011 at 9:05 am |
  19. Jim

    Spot on. Many atheists are about choice. They want their children to have full knowledge, and make up their own minds. Compare this to christians and others, where it is forced down the throats of young children, terrorizing them into compliance, leading to guilt, abuse and worse. But don't forget the other reason – professional advancement. Your chances of advancement are much, much higher if you attend services with your boss, whether supervisor, department chair or dean. Religious discrimination is rampant in our country, but not against christians – it's against atheists and agnostics. We have learned to keep it quiet to avoid ruining careers.

    December 7, 2011 at 8:47 am |
    • andawg

      Really? Painting either side with such a broad brush is wrong. Meet and get to know an individual atheist or christian or person of any other faith and then decide what they stand for and whether you agree. People of faith get fired or disciplined for bringing up their faith too. It goes both ways. Stigmatizing a broad group of people based on their beliefs is akin to racism. Get to know the individual and then decide.

      December 7, 2011 at 9:00 am |
    • MarkinFL

      There are MANY businesses that are quite up front about the fact that they only higher Christians. Atheists for the most part learn not to say anything so as not to be discriminated against. In the work place few people are EVER discriminated against simply because they are Christian. Its when they get preachy or try to proselytize at work that they can get into trouble. Deservedly so in that instance. I have always worked with many Christians without any conflict whatsoever. Usually you can politely deflect any mild attempts at proselytizing. Its usually the serious fundies that feel it is their mission to convert anyone they know, even at work, that generally have problems.

      December 7, 2011 at 9:12 am |
  20. Penny

    As an atheist, I think it's great strategy to take the kids to a couple dozen different churches. Shows them how inconsistent, illogical, and ridiculous all those imaginary friends are.

    December 7, 2011 at 8:46 am |
    • An exercise in futility

      What difference does it make. I'm sure you've brainwashed them beforehand. What's your theory on how it all began? A wave of the hand and abracadabra?

      December 7, 2011 at 8:53 am |
    • Michael Augustine

      Not to start a flame war, but it doesn't sound like your children would really have the chance to make up their own minds.

      December 7, 2011 at 8:54 am |
    • Scott

      ...no, a wave of the hand and abracadabra is more or less the RELIGIOUS viewpoint.

      December 7, 2011 at 8:56 am |
    • Jeff Williams

      """I'm sure you've brainwashed them beforehand. """

      Not really. Your children were born atheists.

      December 7, 2011 at 8:57 am |
    • Cedar Rapids

      "What's your theory on how it all began? A wave of the hand and abracadabra?"

      isnt that closer to your idea of it?
      a magical being casting spells?

      December 7, 2011 at 9:16 am |
    • Chris

      Cedar Rapids... No, more like an intelligent God who had a specific purpose for creating such a dynamic, sophisticated planet and solar system, and galaxy, and designed everything to work perfectly, and in harmony with each other.

      Rapid Rifting in Ethiopia Challenges Evolutionary Model by Brian Thomas, M.S.: http://www.icr.org/articles/view/5106/355/

      Continents Didn't Drift, They Raced by Brian Thomas, M.S.: http://www.icr.org/articles/view/5588/355/

      When Did the Mountains Rise? by John D. Morris, Ph.D.: http://www.icr.org/articles/view/103/355/

      Archaeopteryx Is a Bird. . . Again by Brian Thomas, M.S.: http://www.icr.org/article/6429/

      Evolution Is Biologically Impossible by Joseph Mastropaolo, Ph.D.: http://www.icr.org/article/evolution-biologically-impossible/

      Both Argon and Helium Diffusion Rates Indicate a Young Earth by Larry Vardiman, Ph.D.: http://www.icr.org/article/6229/

      What Magnetized the Moon? by Brian Thomas, M.S.: http://www.icr.org/articles/type/9/

      A Well-Watered Land: Effects of the Genesis Flood on Precipitation in the Middle East by Larry Vardiman, Ph.D.: http://www.icr.org/article/6091/

      'Dinosaur Plant' Evolution Stories Conflict by Brian Thomas, M.S.: http://www.icr.org/article/6433/

      The above mentioned ^^ are just the beginning... I can keep going if you'd like. But this is a good start as to why "atheism" is a religion. Because it is a disbelief in a supernatural creator, which then leaves only one other option – Evolution is the main belief of most atheists, which takes an ENORMOUS amount of faith to believe in. Just read the above mentionted articles, and you'll start to see a little bit of what I mean.

      December 8, 2011 at 4:32 pm |
    • HellBent

      'and designed everything to work perfectly, and in harmony with each other."

      Like how the ebola virus is in harmony with its infected host?

      Or how humans are so perfectly created to be some 30% energy efficient?

      Or maybe your designer isn't very intelligent and you should remove the blinders.

      December 8, 2011 at 4:46 pm |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.