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December 24th, 2011
10:00 PM ET

'What's Christmas without chopsticks?' How other faiths celebrate December 25th

By Eric Marrapodi, CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

(CNN) -
Two days before Christmas, Imam Mohamed Magid, the executive director at the All Dulles Area Muslim Society, preached about Jesus at Friday prayers.

"We live in a country with a majority of Christians, where Christmas is a major holiday... It's a reminder we do believe in Jesus. Jesus' position in Islam is one of the highest prophets in Islam," Magid said, adding that Muslims view Jesus as a prophet on par with Abraham, Moses, Noah and Mohammad.

Often when he says the name of Mohammad or Jesus in conversation, Magid adds the Islamic honorific "Peace be upon him" after his name.

"Jesus is a unifying figure, unifying Muslims and Christians," he said. The Quran, the Islamic scriptures, makes specific mention of Jesus and of his mother Mary. "It's very interesting that there are many places where the prophet (Mohammad) is quoting Jesus."

Christmas has a way of bleeding into other faiths in America.  The Christian holiday celebrating the birth of Jesus Christ in a manger in Bethlehem 2000 some odd years ago is ubiquitous across the country, even if the American tradition has leaned away from the sacred and toward the secular.

Christmas at every corner can be somewhat problematic for those who are not in the estimated 246 million Christians living in the United States.  But for some faiths, the season brings reminders of their own traditions.

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Magid said Muslims believe many of the same things about Jesus that Christians do: Jesus was born of the virgin Mary, he lived a sinless life, he raised the dead, and he preformed miracles. He also said many Muslim scholars believe that Jesus will one day return to the earth, using the Christian vocabulary of "the Second Coming."

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"Certain aspects of our theology are different," he carefully notes, pointing specifically to incarnation, the Christian belief that Jesus was divine. Muslims are perhaps the most ardent monotheists in the world, making them at odds with Christians theologically over not only the Christian doctrine of incarnation, but also belief in the Trinity, that God the Father, the Holy Spirit and Jesus are three in one.

The All Dulles Area Muslim Society is one of the largest Muslim congregations in the country with ties to 5,000 families in the Washington area. Some of the families do put up a Christmas tree and exchange gifts, which one member suspects is often more about cultural assimilation than religious observance.

"I think Muslims, although they believe in Jesus, they give respect to this as a Christian holiday, so they don't pretend to celebrate this in a religious way," Magid said. "A Muslim would not expect a Christian to celebrate his holiday."

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At the Abhayagiri Buddhist Monastery three hours north of San Francisco, there is a small Christmas tree set up near the statue of the Buddha.

"Normally we just have flowers, incense and candles, but now we have a tiny Christmas tree. It's really cute," Ajhan Yatiko, a monk in residence who is originally from Canada, said. "It's more like a traditional thing, respecting and appreciating the culture of where we live."

During the holidays, Yatiko said, "The senior monk might give a talk to the lay people which might draw parallels between the Christian faith and the Buddhist faith, as well as the differences, because I think both of those are important aspects of interfaith harmony.

"Sometimes in the West these days there's a kind of tendency to clump all the religions together and say, 'We're all climbing the same mountain,' and I think the intention there is nice. There's a harmonious intention there. But I think it's much nicer to say, 'Let's respect the differences and love and appreciate the differences of the other faiths," Yatiko said.

For the monks at Abhayagiri, life is spent in meditation, community, celibacy and work. They practice Buddhism in the Theravada tradition or the Thai Forest tradition. In their faith tradition, monks cannot handle money, grow their own food or trade, so they live entirely off of the generosity of others.

That means every half moon, about once a week, they head into town for alms rounds, where they walk around in their saffron robes with alms bowls to collect donations. The new moon this week fell on Christmas Eve.

"Everyone we see is going to be wishing us a Merry Christmas, and we'll be doing likewise," Yatiko said a few days before Christmas.

"We don't touch money and live a very simple lifestyle, so the Christmas tradition of exchanging gifts doesn't work so well for us," Yatiko said.

Yet Buddhists are called to live generously at every chance, be it in material things or spiritual ones, so at Christmastime the monks bring a truckload of fire wood and a fruit basket to a neighboring Ukrainian Catholic monastery.

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"We do have some rather revered traditions for Christmas Day," said Rabbi Rick Rheins.  "I'm not sure if it was Talmudic or not, to visit the movie theater followed by a Chinese dinner," joked Rheins referring the collection of ancient rabbi teaching called the Talmud.

"What's Christmas without chopsticks?" joked Rheins who is the head of Denver's Temple Sinai, a Reform congregation of about 1,100 families.

"We acknowledge the importance of this day for our Christian neighbors and for my Christian colleagues. And so we don't celebrate Christmas as Jews, but we do thrill for our Christian neighbors," he said. Rheins said the celebration of Hanukkah simultaneously at Christmastime this year will mean he won't be bringing in any Christmas metaphors into services on Friday and Saturday.

As for the Christmas Day itself, including the popcorn and chopsticks, he said, "We encourage our members to do special volunteer work to relieve our Christian neighbors of their responsibilities, whether it's at hospitals or emergency services, to give them the opportunity to spend this time with their family and celebrate this sacred day for them.

"Christians and Jews, especially over the last generation, have really worked so hard to build bridges, not just of tolerance, but also have generated true mutual respect and cooperation," he said. He cited working to fight hunger and poverty together. "These are the expressions of a society where the differences in religion and the expressions of one's faith are less divisive than they are enriching.

"I don't think that was the case a generation ago," Rheins said.

Christmas has a way of seeping into Hindu traditions, as well. At least the tree and presents part.  "Because of the children," Uma Mysorekar, the president of the Hindu Temple Society of North America said.

"The children say, 'Oh, there's a tree in my friend's house.  Why not in my house?' So they will get a small tree, a symbolic tree," Mysorekar said.

"We do look up to Jesus as one of the deities of Christianity," Mysorekar said.

At the Hindu Temple Society of North America in the Flushing area of Queens, New York, Christmas Day will be filled with worshipers coming in and out.  Unlike other faiths, Hindus do not have a set day for communal worship.  The temple is a key part of Hinduism for prayer, worship and offerings.  Christmas will be busier because of the three day weekend, Mysorekar guessed.

Their temple even had a holiday party for the children.

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"We have a holiday party for them, and we give them gifts and tell them what it's all about.  You know the Hindu festival of Diwali, it is more or less the same, where we give gifts and we meet with friends... So the custom is very easy to relate to."

During Diwali, the Hindu festival of lights, lamps are lit in celebration of good triumphing over evil.

"Apart from the religious aspect of it - the concept, theme of Christmas - I think it's very much the same all over," she said.

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Belief • Buddhism • Christianity • Christmas • Hinduism • Islam

soundoff (2,252 Responses)
  1. GOD

    EVOLUTION IS NOT REAL... UNLESS THEY PROVE IT, THEN IT WAS MY PLAN

    December 25, 2011 at 9:53 am |
    • +

      You must lead a very lonely and depraved life if all you can do on Christmas morning is spew bigotry.

      December 25, 2011 at 9:55 am |
  2. GOD

    ALMIGHTY POWERFUL BEING... TAKE SEVEN DAYS TO CREATE EVERYTHING

    December 25, 2011 at 9:51 am |
    • LookAndSEE

      Correction: Ex20:11 For in six days the Lord created... and He rested on the Seventh (Sabbath day(yesterday))

      December 25, 2011 at 10:37 am |
  3. Reality check

    No where in the old testament is Jesus mentioned as the so-called messiah. The Hebrew language has not changed for thousands of years – excepting minor spelling changes equivalent to changing a "y" to an "i". The so-called prophecy in question very clearly states that the potential for a great NON-DIVINE leader of the Hebrew people exists in every generation. This great HUMAN leader – called a "messiach" – would be a direct descendent of the House of David and lead the Hebrew people out of suffering. When this great HUMAN leader arrives he would usher in a period of peace and harmony. No where in other histories recorded by other cultures of that time in the surrounding areas mentions any of the story of Jesus, etc. However numerous stories of immaculate conception existed and are recorded in the histories of these other cultures like Augustus Caeser, Alexander the Great etc. Christians have used ONE SINGLE HEBREW WORD that was mistranslated by the Greeks centuries ago to justify their complete fabrication of events. Don't believe me – go to any Rabbi and Hebrew scholar and ask to see the actual, exact passages and have them translated by a NON-JEWISH Hebrew language expert/scholar to see what is ACTUALLY written. Good Luck.

    December 25, 2011 at 9:51 am |
    • B

      Go back and read Genesis 3:15. Your wrong!

      December 25, 2011 at 7:17 pm |
  4. HelloWorld19823

    Merry Christmas to all!!!!
    Sincerely,
    A Hindu man

    December 25, 2011 at 9:51 am |
  5. BleBla

    Christmas is about being told what to believe and what to consumer. Yeshua was not born on December 25th. Google Mithras for that one. Weak unquestioning minds will do anything. Look at America today.

    December 25, 2011 at 9:51 am |
  6. GOD

    DAY 1 CREATE LIGHT... DAY 3 CREATE LIGHT SOURCE

    December 25, 2011 at 9:50 am |
    • Jeff

      Light Day One. Light source day 3??? I don't look at these posts due to mean spirited intensions.
      Obviously this person thinks the only source for light is the sun. If He created all things I suppose He is source for many things, including light.

      Also, we live in 4 dimensions. How many more do you suppose we are not aware of?

      December 25, 2011 at 10:14 am |
    • JohnR

      @Jeff That was really weak. The main source of light on earth now, and certainly ancient days, was the sun.

      December 25, 2011 at 10:34 am |
  7. GOD

    JOB LOVES ME AND FOLLOWS MY RULES... KILL HIS FAMILY AND COVER WITH BOILS- LOLZ

    December 25, 2011 at 9:49 am |
  8. GOD

    I MADE FOSSILS... TO TEST YOUR FAITH

    December 25, 2011 at 9:48 am |
  9. GOD

    BORN IN NON-CHRISTIAN COUNTRY... DOOMED

    December 25, 2011 at 9:48 am |
  10. GOD

    CREATE WORLD FOR HUMANS... 70% SALT WATER

    December 25, 2011 at 9:47 am |
  11. GOD

    PROHIBIT ABORTION... CAUSE MISCARRIAGES

    December 25, 2011 at 9:47 am |
  12. GOD

    JEWS ARE CHOSEN PEOPLE... LOL HOLOCAUST

    December 25, 2011 at 9:46 am |
  13. Truthz

    IF AT FIRST YOU DON'T SUCCEED... KILL EVERYONE

    December 25, 2011 at 9:45 am |
    • +

      It's Christmas morning and all you have is bitterness?

      December 25, 2011 at 9:59 am |
  14. JohnR

    Any and all, today I will celebrate Xmas by having Chinese food with my sis and mom and possibly my older brother's wife's brother at a buffet. And it'll be grand. My dogs aren't doing anything special today, but they each got a hard boiled egg yesterday!

    December 25, 2011 at 9:44 am |
  15. kr

    The truth is for Catholic Christians, the resurrection is the most important event in the Jesus story. The birth of Jesus was not too important in early Universal (Catholic) Christianity (there were no Protestants and Evangelicals then and those small Christians sects now) when they were still persecuted in the Roman Empire. Early Christians forgot and did not know the exact date of Jesus birth so they decided to choose 25 December. It is better to celebrate Jesus birth on a certain day than not to celebate at all even when do not know the exact date.

    December 25, 2011 at 9:44 am |
  16. Truthz

    PERFORM INCREDIBLE MIRACLES INFRONT OF IGNORANT ANCIENT FARMERS... WORK IN 'MYSTERIOUS WAYS' WHEN SCIENCE COMES ALONG

    December 25, 2011 at 9:44 am |
    • JohnR

      Hit the eggnog early, Truthz?

      December 25, 2011 at 9:46 am |
  17. Truthz

    I MADE YOU THAT WAY... I HATE YOU BECAUSE OF IT

    December 25, 2011 at 9:43 am |
  18. Truthz

    EGYPT DOESN'T RELEASE JEWS, SEND PLAGUE... HITLER KILLS MILLIONS, DO NOTHING

    December 25, 2011 at 9:42 am |
  19. Truthz

    GIVE FREEWILL... PUNISH FOR EATING APPLES

    December 25, 2011 at 9:41 am |
  20. Paul

    Christmas is about peace on Earth and goodwill towards all. I'm glad so many people participate from many backgrounds.

    December 25, 2011 at 9:41 am |
    • +

      Merry Christmas, Paul!

      December 25, 2011 at 9:58 am |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.