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My Take: Why I’m a Catholic for contraception
February 10th, 2012
02:30 PM ET

My Take: Why I’m a Catholic for contraception

Editor's Note: Karalen L. Morthole is a senior majoring in political science at Catholic University of America.

By Karalen L. Morthole, Special to CNN

I have been a Catholic my whole life. Baptized as a baby and confirmed in the seventh grade, I attended weekly catechism classes and received a Jesuit education. Never once did the opinion of the church on a person's use of contraceptives surface.

In high school, I was prescribed birth control to balance my hormones. I suffered from terrible mood swings that had negative effects on my relationship with my family and got me into trouble with teachers. I also experienced menstrual cramps so painful as to be debilitating; sometimes, they left me unable to move.

My mother, a devout Catholic, had no problem with my taking birth control, because she recognized the dramatic effects this simple medication had on my life. Birth control gave me a new, healthy and balanced way to live. As a 22-year-old woman, I am able to think more rationally because of birth control.

Teachers at the Jesuit high school I attended urged students to protect themselves when they became sexually active, to use condoms to stamp out the risk of contracting a viral sexually transmitted disease that would affect the rest of their lives. Some would criticize my teachers for that, but I thank them. My peers and I were taught by caring and realistic teachers with experience making decisions to promote their own health. Some had seen the horrors of sexually transmitted diseases.

CNN's Belief Blog – all the faith angles to the day's top stories

Birth control, condoms and emergency contraception have all served their purpose in my life, because each work in different preventative ways. Birth control has aided my mental health, giving me a clearer head; condoms have protected me from contracting diseases from sexual partners. Emergency contraceptives were there when I was uncertain about whether I’d become pregnant and needed reassurance. I’m not ready to raise a child on my own.

Even though the official Catholic Church teaches against contraceptives, I do not feel immoral using them. They’ve allowed me to live my life without the fear of unwanted pregnancies or deadly diseases.

My religion has played a large part of my life, laying the groundwork for my personal relationship with God. It has taught me how to respect others, be a human with integrity and help those in need. Catholicism is a beautiful religion that supports family values and tolerance of others and leads us to serve others, a teaching I’ve adapted into my everyday living. The Catholic Church does an exceptional job standing up for those who live in poverty and suffer injustices.

But on contraception, the Catholic bishops have taken a stance that violates the basic rights that affect millions of Catholics across the country and shows a lack of concern for women's health.

It is disheartening that the Catholic bishops were so opposed to the Obama administration's decision to require religious institutions like hospitals and colleges to provide their faculty, staff and students with access to reproductive health care, which includes birth control, emergency contraceptives and condoms. Even after the White House announced a revised policy Friday that exempts religious institutions from having to pay for the contraception coverage, at least one bishop voiced disgust. The U.S. bishops said in a statement Friday that it's "too soon to tell whether and how much improvement (there's been) on core concerns."

The bishops have gone so far as to threaten to cease health care coverage to the faculty and staff at my college if it’s forced to comply with the Affordable Health Care Act.

Even though the church will not support women's health needs and denies them opportunities to care for their physical and mental health, it does apparently condone other uses for condoms. In 2010, Pope Benedict XVI endorsed the use of condoms for male prostitutes, saying condoms “can be a first step in the direction of a moralization, a first assumption of responsibility,” and could help “in the intention of reducing the risk of infection.”

In my view, any sexual activity that spreads deadly diseases is sinful because it shows complete disregard for human health and human life. The Catholic Church believes that condoms negatively impact the sexual lives of men and women, preventing reproduction and the creation of life.

I believe that condoms are, in fact, pro-life. They help women and men act responsibly in regards to the spread of HIV/AIDS. Condoms also prevent unintended pregnancies that could result in abortions, another issue that the Catholic Church has strong views about.

As a Catholic, I stand with President Obama's decision to require religious institutions to provide access to contraceptives. I believe that birth control can be used by religious people without having a negative effect on someone’s faith. Catholics value human life. I believe that includes acknowledging the rights of women to take care of our bodies.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Karalen L. Morthole.

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Uncategorized

soundoff (1,826 Responses)
  1. George

    The church is not run as a democracy, and its members chose to follow the doctrine or not – or pick and chose as this young lady has chosen to do.

    February 11, 2012 at 10:36 am |
    • Concerned Lutheran

      You're right George, it is not a democracy. Christians are supposed to be servants of one another. The hierarchy is failing to serve and requiring others to serve its dictates.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:43 am |
    • HotAirAce

      Or as the very high percentage of catholics that use birth control do, or as the 300,000+ Catholics that get abortions each year in the USA do.

      This woman is not alone!

      February 11, 2012 at 10:44 am |
    • Flinders, the butler

      It used to be a democracy. Only when the RC's adopted the early Medieval Italian authority paradigm, did it become what it is today. o you know why "cardinals" dress like they do ?

      February 11, 2012 at 10:45 am |
    • El Flaco

      Catholicism is a buffet of contradictory beliefs. Each Catholic selects from the buffet whatever he or she prefers to believe. There is no obligation to adhere to a particular one of the many dogmas that Catholics espouse.

      It was thought by Church scholars in the Middle Ages that when a good woman died she would be transformed into a man as she entered Heaven. This is because imperfection could not be tolerated in Heaven. Do you subscribe to this traditional Catholic teaching?

      February 11, 2012 at 11:13 am |
    • WRP

      El Flaco, technically this was not the teaching of the Church scholars but gnostic writings from first centuries of Christianity. If I remember correctly apocryphal “Gospel of Thomas” refers to woman being changed to a man to make her worthy of heaven. Nevertheless, these writings were never accepted but the Catholics and Protestants together.

      February 11, 2012 at 11:20 am |
    • visitor

      That's right, and anyone who voted for Bush Jr voted for someone Pope John himself decried.

      ³A war would be a defeat for humanity and would be neither morally nor
      legally justified,² the Pope told Bush in a papal message delivered last
      week by a special envoy. ³It is an unjust war.²

      February 11, 2012 at 12:42 pm |
  2. George

    Is this article suggesting since one person in the Catholic church uses birth control, the hierarchy should capitulate to the pressures of the Obama administration?

    February 11, 2012 at 10:35 am |
    • Prayer is not healthy for children and other living things

      Prayer takes people away from actually working on real solutions to their problems.
      Prayer makes you kneel to sicko guys who wear expensive dresses and abuse kids.
      George capitulates daily to his boyfriends.
      Prayer wears out your clothes prematurely.
      Prayer contributes to global warming through excess CO2 emissions.
      Prayer fucks up your knees and your neck and your back.
      Prayer can cause heart attacks, especially among the elderly.
      Prayer reveals how stupid you are to the world.
      Prayer exposes your backside to pervert priests.
      Prayer makes you think doilies are exciting.
      Prayer makes your kids avoid spending time with you.
      Prayer prevents you from getting badly needed exercise.
      Prayer makes you frothy like Rick Santorum. Just google him to find out.
      Prayer dulls your senses and prevents you from thinking.
      Prayer makes you even more fat than you already were.
      Prayer makes you post really stupid shit.
      Prayer makes you hoard cats.
      Prayer makes you smell like shitty kitty litter and leads you on to harder drugs.
      Prayer wastes time.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:37 am |
    • HotAirAce

      George, she's merely offering her opinion, but perhaps she forgot opinions, especially from women, are not welcome by most cult's male dominated power structures.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:40 am |
    • Concerned Lutheran

      Karalen is representative of Catholics of her generation. The Catholic hierarchy fails to serve her generation in an important regard: to provide an acceptable moral standard that supports reproductive freedom.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:40 am |
    • kendallpeak

      Concerned Luthern, each generation should serve the Lord, not demand that His Church serve them.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:43 am |
    • HotAirAce

      No generation has an obligation to propagate the jesus, or any other, myth. Each generation naturally evaluates the myths of prior generations and sheds them, continues with them, or invents their own. Fortunately the trend is away from supernatural Sky Daddies.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:51 am |
    • Floretta

      No. She is not one person. But she is representative of the 98% of women (including Catholic women) who use, will use, or have used contraception during their reproductive years. And, I would remind you, that MANY women use birth control pills for NON-contraceptive reasons. But the church makes no accommodation for them, does it? Or for non-Catholics among their employees? The church can feel free to stick to its guns but it cannot flaunt labor laws and EEOC regulations. No one is stopping them from giving up all federal and state monies if they choose to go that root, I think it's high time all religious tax exemptions be removed. American Catholic bishops, at least, seem to have gotten confused about separation of church and state. They are free to practice their beliefs up to the point when they begin to impose their beliefs on non-Catholics.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:58 am |
  3. WRP

    Although I am not a Catholic I understand why the Church is against artificial contraception. I am surprised that Karalen growing up in a Catholic family and going to Catholic school would never learn the rational behind why the Church is against contraception. It goes back to Thomas Aquinas and the natural theology of the Church. To be a devout Catholic someone should better understand the teaching of its church. Karalen approached the issue from a pragmatic standpoint which so happen I support. Unfortunately, her view can not be defended based on a Catholic tradition and theology.

    February 11, 2012 at 10:35 am |
    • Flinders, the butler

      It's not "unnatural" because they went to the drug store to get it. The artificial distinction between "natural" and "unnatural" is illogical. Why is it "natural" to make a plan, (NFP), and unnatural to take a pill ? Every observed human behavior is "natural".

      February 11, 2012 at 10:48 am |
    • El Flaco

      No Catholic has an obligation to be 'devout' by your standards. Most Catholics are not thinking about Thomas Aquinas during Mass; they are thinking about lunch. Each individual Catholic believes whatever he or she wants to believe – just as you do.

      Catholicism is a buffet of contradictory beliefs. Each Catholic selects from the buffet whatever he or she prefers to believe. There is no obligation to adhere to a particular one of the many dogmas that Catholics espouse.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:58 am |
    • WRP

      Well stated El Flaco. I think you expressed exactly how the Catholicism is played out in US. Unfortunately, your view is in opposition to the teaching of the Church. You are not allowed to pick and chose what to belief or not. Your thinking is influenced by western democracy more than the teaching of the Church. (Again, I am not a Catholic)

      February 11, 2012 at 11:10 am |
    • visitor

      Aquinas considered women subhumans. Not a great example there.

      February 11, 2012 at 1:47 pm |
    • Concerned Catholic

      El Faco, You are just plain wrong. Without being a catholic, how can you know what Catholics are thinking? And, I would like to know what these contradicting buffets of beliefs are? I have been to churches all over the country, and it seems that the teachings in those churches have always been the same. In fact, one of the greatest things about the church is that it teaches a unified message to everyone.

      February 12, 2012 at 10:47 am |
  4. Mball572

    The catholic church needs to wake up, join the 21st century and acknowledge contraception is a normal and necessary part of modern life. They continue to stand behind a contrived and quite frankly, stupid policy. Complaining that the policy is a challenge to religious freedom is a joke. They should spend their time adressing the child molesters they've been breaking the law to hide before making any complaints about anything else.

    February 11, 2012 at 10:34 am |
    • mduerler

      No you need to wake up this isn't a religous issue. Pay for your own birth control.Why is it a health issue. I guess next if you can't afford the booze the tax payers will have to pick that up to.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:37 am |
    • Mball572

      If this is a health issue then I guess the church can convene a death panel and those who aren't catholic don't get treatment.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:46 am |
    • Concerned Catholic

      Really? So, basically you are saying that anytime our socially acceptable rules change, the catholic church should also change their rules to conform?

      February 12, 2012 at 10:39 am |
  5. El Flaco

    "Doctor, I have a terrible emotional problem. I'm terrified of getting pregnant because I can't afford another child right now."

    "My dear, I am diagnosing you with Pregnantophobia – an irrational fear of pregnancy. I'm prescribing birth control pills. It has been proven that birth control pills dramatically reduce the symptoms of Pregnantophobia."

    "Thank you, Doctor."

    February 11, 2012 at 10:34 am |
  6. jared

    Government is trying everything they can to drive up premiums until no one can afford it anymore. so counterproductive, another example of government waist.

    February 11, 2012 at 10:33 am |
    • Liz M

      waste

      February 11, 2012 at 10:38 am |
    • Ron D-

      What nonsense, jared! The whole program is dramatically reducing costs to all of us. Do a little research on your own instead of listening to the self-serving media heads who are making millions off of the ignorance of their listeners.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:43 am |
    • nolapearl

      1. Learn to spell. 2. Your argument lacks common sense.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:44 am |
    • mduerler

      Name one cost cutting measure in Obama care. Insurance rates have doubled because they have to cover all this nonsense stuff. They have increased taxes and fees. hey have created a new goverment ageny inside the IRS to make sure everyone is paying. Where is the savings Ron?

      February 11, 2012 at 10:51 am |
  7. Ed

    McCatholocism. Stand at a menu and pick what you want. You can write anything you want to justify hypocrosy, it's still hypocrosy. Either have the guts to stand up for the faith, or don't but admit it and move on....

    February 11, 2012 at 10:31 am |
  8. Prayer is not healthy for children and other living things

    Prayer takes people away from actually working on real solutions to their problems.
    Prayer makes you kneel to sicko guys who wear expensive dresses and abuse kids.
    Prayer wears out your clothes prematurely.
    Prayer contributes to global warming through excess CO2 emissions.
    Prayer fucks up your knees and your neck and your back.
    Prayer can cause heart attacks, especially among the elderly.
    Prayer reveals how stupid you are to the world.
    Prayer exposes your backside to pervert priests.
    Prayer makes you think doilies are exciting.
    Prayer makes your kids avoid spending time with you.
    Prayer prevents you from getting badly needed exercise.
    Prayer makes you frothy like Rick Santorum. Just google him to find out.
    Prayer dulls your senses and prevents you from thinking.
    Prayer makes you even more fat than you already were.
    Prayer makes you post really stupid shit.
    Prayer makes you hoard cats.
    Prayer makes you smell like shitty kitty litter and leads you on to harder drugs.
    Prayer wastes time.

    February 11, 2012 at 10:30 am |
    • cmonyall

      stop playing with the computer and go clean your room.

      February 11, 2012 at 11:15 am |
  9. M. Holmes

    http://www.catholicleague.org/birth-control-is-not-the-issue/

    February 11, 2012 at 10:28 am |
    • Peter Metz

      ^^^^New Republican talking point ^^^^^

      February 11, 2012 at 10:32 am |
    • mduerler

      This not any ones talking point. Bisrth control is your business. If you want it pay for it. Why should I pay for yours?

      February 11, 2012 at 10:34 am |
    • Floretta

      @mduerler – would you prefer your tax dollars go to support more unwanted children, families in need, etc.?

      February 11, 2012 at 11:01 am |
  10. chrism

    Well once again the media is unbalanced and panders to what they perceive as what is popular. Congrats CNN you get a college major to give her opinion, feature it on the front page, and why bother indeed getting a bishop or someone to clarify the church 's position. First of all Karalen is just confused. Hormones can be prescribed for medical indications, such as for endometriosis or hormone replacement therapy in the elderly, or in Karalen's case to treat perhaps it sounds something like bipolar disorder. This is medical use and the church is not opposed to prescribing hormones to treat illness. Karalen you ought to realize you have an illness. Normal people don't need pills to feel normal. So the church was never opposed to your use. But then you throw in STDs. Well there are many ways to prevent those, including being careful about what you do and who you do it with. Abstinence can avoid STDs also. When you boil it down, what you're really saying is you don't think promiscuity is a sin. That may be a popular position to take, Karalen. You may get many woohoos and right on. Because that's what many want. Just like when people shouted Give us Barabbas instead of Jesus. You see Jesus didn't say things just to be popular. To the contrary, He spoke the Truth even when it is unpopular.

    Now an article like this is almost bait. Because if you disagree you can sound like you're judging. Well no one here is judging you, Karalen. I didn't even know you and your choices for your life are between you and God. But when you write an article about what's right and wrong, well Karalen, it's no longer just about your life. Your talking about other people's lives. And then people have every right to speak up in disagreement.

    February 11, 2012 at 10:28 am |
    • Ed

      VERY well stated. Thank you.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:33 am |
    • chrism

      Humane Vitae came out in 1968 but it reaffirmed what was in the Didache or teachings of the apostles and also in the bible. There is a reference in St. Paul's letters in the original Latin to Parmakopaeia. He was referring to just that. Yes 2000 years ago there were contraceptives. And people used them then just as now – to avoid responsibility and live a promiscuous lifestyle. The church is right. Taking responsibility is important. Today many dads are just a child support check to their ex wives and kids. Today s3x without possibility of pregnancy is looked at as a natural right, and children are looked at as an accidental inconvenience. In the past 40 years rates of unmarried cohabitators has gone way up. The ones to suffer are not just ourselves but the children. The pill gives many a false sense of who they are and how God made them, it distorts their understanding of their purpose in life. Again, as a medication to treat endometriosis or these "mood swings" (again maybe bipolar disorder but certainly something wrong) there is no issue in the church,.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:33 am |
    • George

      spot on... CNN is filtering my posts this AM. Not sure why but I do agree.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:35 am |
    • chrism

      And what of this being right. All too often people act like if you don't do something the church says you're going to you know where. Come on. If there's any outdated antiquated notion to get past lets let it be that one, that's not what the church says. We're all sinners. And the church affirms God's great love and mercy for each of us, God is so loving and merciful. Shut that doesn't mean a sin isn't a sin. Do you remember what Jesus said to the woman caught in adultery? Neither do I condemn you. Go and what? Right. Go and sin no more. You see God doesn't say we don't sin. He says He forgives us for our sins, and again no one here is judging you, Karalen. If you engage in promiscuity and contraception it's your choice it's none of my business and you won't here me say anything. But if you write an editorial saying promiscuity and contraception are "not sin" then well just as here, I wrote my editorial comment that you are wrong, There are sins and sin is a real thng. There are some sins worse than others. We are all sinners. We are not to judge anyone else's sins. And thank God for His forgiveness of our sins. But no, I and others need not agree with you that there is no sin. I listen to the timeless wisdom of God, not the human opinion of the times. God bless you.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:35 am |
    • Prayer is not healthy for children and other living things

      Prayer takes people away from actually working on real solutions to their problems.
      Prayer makes you kneel to sicko guys who wear expensive dresses and abuse kids.
      Catholics are very stupid people.
      Prayer wears out your clothes prematurely.
      Prayer contributes to global warming through excess CO2 emissions.
      Prayer fucks up your knees and your neck and your back.
      Prayer can cause heart attacks, especially among the elderly.
      Prayer reveals how stupid you are to the world.
      Prayer exposes your backside to pervert priests.
      Prayer makes you think doilies are exciting.
      Prayer makes your kids avoid spending time with you.
      Prayer prevents you from getting badly needed exercise.
      Prayer makes you frothy like Rick Santorum. Just google him to find out.
      Prayer dulls your senses and prevents you from thinking.
      Prayer makes you even more fat than you already were.
      Prayer makes you post really stupid shit.
      Prayer makes you hoard cats.
      Prayer makes you smell like shitty kitty litter and leads you on to harder drugs.
      Prayer wastes time.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:35 am |
    • sparknut

      I find it amusing that you say, "And then people have every right to speak up in disagreement." But when Catholics speak up in disagreement with the Roman Catholic hierarchy, they are told to be quiet, to be good Catholics and submit to the authority of the church.
      In fact, there are many views of contraception. I believe that it is my Christian duty to use contraception in a world that is over populated.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:36 am |
    • tffl

      Just like others have a right to speak up when the Church holds positions (that the Church wants to impose on non-Catholics) that the others disagree with. Or even when the Church argues against contraceptive use by Catholics, as that is effectively arguing for overpopulation.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:36 am |
    • chrism

      Ed and George thank you. Sorry I had to break up something I was writing to 3 parts it wouldn't let me post it at first. Also "Shut"shout be "But" typo sorry. Thank you both though. I get continuously struck by the tactics used in these culture wars. Now we've literally got our featur front page pieces on one of the most timely topics of the day coming from a 20 year old with a pretty face. No balance no article from the church. It's nothing short of an outrageous attack on the church all glossied up behind a young pretty smile. Makes me sick.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:41 am |
    • WRP

      Well said

      February 11, 2012 at 10:43 am |
    • science

      What you are writing shows the complete lack of knowledge and why you shouldn't have an opinion on that.
      Since you are for sure one of the "impossible to convince people" just two facts you should know:
      birth control pills are hormones and prescribed for the reasons she described and women on birth control have a far lower risk for ovarian cancer then women not taking it.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:47 am |
    • Neo-Platonism

      chrism: St. Paul didn't write in Latin. He wrote in Greek.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:47 am |
    • Flinders, the butler

      George an chrism's god is a stupid god. They proclaim in Moral Theology the crux of a moral act is INTENTION. Then they make PLANs. Natural Family PLANning. They make charts, take temperatures, abstain, and do everything they can think of to prevent a pregnancy, (except take a pill), and they think their god is too dumb to notice what they are up to.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:52 am |
    • chrism

      Thank you for the correction, Pharmakopaiae is a Greek word. The point is still entirely correct I should have just said Greek not Latin.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:53 am |
    • chrism

      Science, lol, practice what you preach, if opinions are bad don't have any. As for me I'll continue to seek truth and have and express my beliefs and opinions according to what I feel called to, and your opinion on that plus 10 cents couldn't buy a gum ball. As far as knowledge, Einsttein, I'll stake mine against yours any day of the week. Of your two points the first is exactly what I already wrote, thanks for parroting. The second would be a medical use, and it needs to be balanced against the risk of increased breast, cervical and liver cancer. It may also be obtainable without blocking pregnancy. See ya, doc.

      February 11, 2012 at 11:11 am |
  11. Mort C

    I agree with Ms. Morthole. The problem is that the Catholic Church keeps telling it's members that they can't be 'cafeteria catholics'. They have to buy into the entire package. That is the reason the I left the Catholic Church for another religion.

    February 11, 2012 at 10:27 am |
  12. yikes

    Karalen – what you say is extremely valid but what you don't realize is that people in your parish and your priest will call for your excommunication – you are willfully telling them that you commit a sin (in their eyes) that you are not sorry for. The catholic church has been interfering in the personal lives of others for centuries. They make up new laws all of the time and say Jesus made that law. In the past few decades they have gone from what I was taught to a new type of God – from a loving God to one that we should fear. All of the these laws are made for a purposeful agenda of the church. It is difficult for me personally when a church so fervently believes that contraception is morally wrong when that same church allows their priests to molest children and knowingly have let them hide behind their frocks.

    February 11, 2012 at 10:26 am |
    • Floretta

      @yikes – if the Catholic Church excommunicated every parishioner who used birth control there'd be nobody left but the clergy, some sisters (even they use hormones to control fibroids and menstrual cramps), and a handful of virgins and exhausted mothers.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:47 am |
  13. pct

    if you–Catholic or not- have a problem with the Church's position regarding birth control, leave the church or write to the Pope. This has NOTHING to do with GOVERNMENT policy!

    February 11, 2012 at 10:25 am |
    • tffl

      But the Church wants to _make_ it part of government policy, affecting not just Catholics...

      February 11, 2012 at 10:30 am |
  14. Aucausin

    "As a 22-year-old woman, I am able to think more rationally because of birth control." ~ Karalen L. Morthole
    If you were thinking rationally you wouldn't be Catholic.

    This lady is disgusting. She's willing to ignore the parts of her faith she doesn't like and that damage her own life and well-being. But I'm sure when it comes to gay marriage she'll vote no cause it's immoral.

    "Catholicism is a beautiful religion that supports family values and tolerance of others and leads us to serve others a teaching I’ve adapted into my everyday living." ~ Karalen L. Morthole
    I'm sure "family values" mean hate the gays and try and ban gay marriage. Since when does tolerance mean hate? Disgusting, immoral, irrational, hypocritical jerk.

    February 11, 2012 at 10:25 am |
    • Molly

      Sorry, but for a second there, it looked like you based your whole reply on something she didn't even address. It is completely unfair to her to assume what she believes or why she believes it and then insult her over YOUR projections.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:52 am |
  15. M. Holmes

    Please check in with 'The Catholic League for Religious and Civil Rights'. This is not about birth control.

    February 11, 2012 at 10:21 am |
    • rlowens1

      Since when has the Catholic church concerned itself with any other civil rights besides the right of people to be deceived by religion?

      February 11, 2012 at 10:24 am |
    • Rideitout

      You're either part of the solution or you're part of the problem.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:25 am |
    • mduerler

      the problem with libs is they always won't to tell you what to do with your money. Why should anyone pay for anyone elses BIRTH CONTROL. That has nothing to do with health care. It is just another liberal give away that someone has to pay for.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:27 am |
    • kendallpeak

      rowens1, this article was about the author's theory that one can call oneself one thing yet believe a contrary belief. Perhaps you should improve your reading skills.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:33 am |
    • Flinders, the butler

      so mdulrer, I just bet you want childbirth paid for.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:34 am |
    • kendallpeak

      This is all a side issue. Here's a more important issue. When I joined the local swim club they wanted me to learn to swim. Those dictators. I told them I was a "swimmer" who never got in the water. They said I should join another group. They are intolerant and non progressive.

      February 11, 2012 at 12:38 pm |
  16. rlowens1

    Just say "no" to imaginary friends.

    February 11, 2012 at 10:16 am |
    • leeann

      Childish.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:25 am |
    • rlowens1

      Yes, any adult with an imaginary friend is childish.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:27 am |
    • kendallpeak

      Your atheism is not what this article was about. Perhaps you should read more to improve your reading comprehension.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:31 am |
    • rlowens1

      I don't care what this article is about. I'm here to laugh and point at adults with imaginary friends. Why? Because, reasoning with people who care nothing about reason is pointless.

      The entire position of the Catholic Church is that, by the Authority of God, they can tell their followers how to act, think, feel, and believe. Well, when they can prove that their "God" (whatever that is) exists and that He has given them that authority, I will stop laughing and pointing at them. Until then, I will show no respect for anyone so arrogant as to pretend to know the mind and will of God. Got it?

      February 11, 2012 at 10:46 am |
    • Concerned Catholic

      My wife and I are Catholic and follow the churches teachings on contraceptives. At one time, during her teens and early 20's, my wife used birth control to control hormones and ease cramping, just as this woman mentions is why she uses it. Before we married, we decided that she should stop taking birth control in order to be compliant with the church's teachings. Once she stopped the birth control, she found that her cramping pain and hormonal imbalance was not nearly as extreme as when she was younger.

      Also, instead of teaching contraception, this woman's teachers should have been teaching church-approved methods like abstinence until marriage and natural family planning. Natural family planning is church-approved and is a proven method that can be used to either avoid pregnancy or maximize the chance of pregnancy. Just because this woman uses contraceptives and her teachers condone the usage of contraceptives, it does not mean that it is approved by the church. I believe, just like the catholic church, that any form of contraceptive is indeed immoral since it does not promote life. In my opinion, I do not think this woman is a practicing catholic since she is ignoring this basic teaching of the catholic church. I hope she also understands that she should not be participating in communion until she begins following the church's teachings on this issue and gives a confession.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:57 am |
  17. Michele

    I'm so tired of people whining and complaining about contraceptives and their purposes...whether it be for family plannign issues OR to treat a "medical condition" for women that just an't suck it up and toughen up. Most are CLUELESS to how insurance works. For a fully insured plan, the money that you and your employer pay go to premiums which pay for EVERYONE'S care. Your premium paid by you and your employer is not "set aside" for just you and your family when needed. If that was the case, when you leave a job, all of the money left over from your premium would be returned to you. For self-funded plans, the insured usually pays through dues or a deduction from his/her paycheck, and the employer pays for the treatment/service. There IS a choice out there, and it appears that no one sees it!!! If your employer's plan doesn't meet your needs, you're always free to contact any insurance company and pick up your own private health coverage for you and/or your family, OR, you're free to change your job to find employment with an employer whose plan better suits your needs. Stop whining and complaining and pay for your crap yourself!

    February 11, 2012 at 10:15 am |
    • Irishcat

      AGREE!!!!!!!!!

      February 11, 2012 at 10:19 am |
    • Rideitout

      U.S. health-care mumbo-jumbo..Insurance companies are incapable of doing the right thing..

      February 11, 2012 at 10:19 am |
    • Todd Beaucoudray

      Michele, you don't pay for anything yourself if you use an insurance company. That's the stupidest argument ever. Why do you have insurance? Because you couldn't afford to pay for it yourself. It's a bailout system because the prices are so ridiculous. If you think it's so easy, maybe go break your neck, live life with an incurable condition and then come back and tell us how it is to pay for all the things you need.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:24 am |
    • Michele

      @ Todd..Sorry for your "condition". However, I work in the field, and I KNOW what insurance pays. They don't have a problem paying for stuff that is "medically necessary" and/or to "sustain life". However, your doctors are a bunch of whack jobs that come out with some "new and improved" treatment that hasn't been probperly tested, and they want everyone to pay for it. I KNOW what the bills rack up to...I see them every day. You are also misled...insurance isn't there to pay for all of your stuff...it's there to help subsidize the cost. You want to go throwing rocks???? Go throw them at the doctors and the rest of the medical whack jobs out there as well as the pscyological whack jobs that have a way of convincing people that they NEED everything under the sun. Don't even think of going there with me...you'll lose!

      February 11, 2012 at 10:29 am |
    • Tessa

      Here's the issue with the concept of buying another medical policy directly from the insurance company . . . many of them, including the big ones . . . are corrupt. The minute people get sick and really need insurance, the companies are looking for a loophole to get out of paying. I work for a self-insured company and have the luxury of having my medical bills paid fairly because it's not coming out of the insurer's pocket. My friends who buy from an insurance company are constantly battling to have their claims paid . . . Then there are the people who get dropped when they start costing the insurance companies too much. Through your employer you're protected from that. So just going out and buying a policy on your own is risky.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:31 am |
    • Flinders, the butler

      so Michele, you're going to pay for YOUR crap yourself...your childbirths.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:36 am |
    • Michele

      Let me clarify...when I said it pays for EVERYONE'S care, I mean everyone that is in your group...not the entire population.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:39 am |
    • Michele

      @ Flinder – Been there done that...paid for all of my contraceptives MYSELF. We didn't have "coverage" for it then, and I wouldn't have taken the pill if it was given to me for free. People are also clueless in how it works and what it does tot he body.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:41 am |
    • Michele

      @ Tessa...self-funded groups pay for me b/c they avoid the overhang from the insurance companies...the portions that go to paying employees to process claims and all the other administrative issues. Most people that go out and find their own plans through insurance companies are clueless to how insurance works, and they just take the salesperson's word as law. They don't bother to read anything and/or ask questions...they just hear that you have a $20 Copay for doctors visits and never bother to fully review the entire plan and what it offers. I constantly fight with sales people and tell them they CAN'T continue to BS people and tell them that this and/or that is covered and so on and so forth. The problem isn't the insurance carrier...it's the sales people. If people were to educate themselves a bit more about such an important topic as health coverage in the same manner in which they educate themselves about who is going to be the next American Idol, 9/10 of these problems wouldn't even exist.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:46 am |
    • Flinders, the butler

      Michele,
      You didn't answer the question. I asked if you used coverage for your deliveries. I bet you did. "Your crap" is ALL your lifestyle choices. Can't have it both ways.

      February 11, 2012 at 11:13 am |
    • Michele

      @ Flinders...didn't intentionally avoid any question you may have had. In additon to paying for my own contraceptives, YES I did pay for my delivery (I have one who is a grown.) I paid my premiums and my COPAYS when I went for my OB visits, and I paid my COPAY when I had testing done, and I paid my COPAY for the acutal labor and delivery charges. Point: I paid my share, and childbirth is the most natural thing in the world. NOW I'm expected to pay for everyone else's contraceptive use...they are now not to required to pay a single dime other than their premium which is going to go up anyway and cost more in the long run than if the were to have a COPAY. It's not rocket science, it's simple math. Take a $14 Copay for a 3 month supply of "the pill" through mail order. Now there 's no copay. In order to pay for everyone's copays, now premiums are going to go up...let's say just for argument sake $15-20/month. Your monthly cost with your copay would be $7...now it's $20...Not only are you paying for your copay, but now you're also dishing over an additional $13/month in premiums. Why should I have to pay an extra $20/month because some chick wants her pills AND what that chick isn't realizing is that she's going to be paying for it and then some...in one way, shape or form. Please don't argue with me until you know what you're talking about.

      February 11, 2012 at 11:43 am |
    • Michele

      Oops...make that 3 month supply $21, not $14.

      February 11, 2012 at 11:50 am |
    • visitor

      Yes Michele, so women won't become overly aggressive.

      February 11, 2012 at 12:47 pm |
  18. kendallpeak

    A pick and choose Catholic like the author should consider finding another faith, or even better, just becoming an "if it feels good do it' follower. She picks and chooses on contraception, the next person on adultry, and the next on wether they believe in that guy Jesus. It doesn't work that way. It's like being a boyscout who doesn't like that truthful, honest, and prepared stuff. If you can't follow the precepts of your faith, quit, but leave true Catholics to following the Lord.

    February 11, 2012 at 10:15 am |
    • rlowens1

      Yeah, I imagine she "picks and choose" when she decides whether or not to stone to death her unruly children, too. Your point?

      February 11, 2012 at 10:18 am |
    • Joseph

      i agree, a pick and choose catholic isnt a true catholic. it isnt a democracy, so either find a new faith or toughen up. i was born a catholic. raised a catholic, and i had enough respect for the church to stop claiming to be a catholic when i stopped living it.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:23 am |
    • kendallpeak

      riowens1, my point is clear. If you don't like the teachings of your faith, leave. We are such children in this age. Since we refuse to change, we demand entire faiths change to accomodate us. How immature.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:27 am |
    • Andrew

      Yeah, she should stop following ancient fairy tales about gods that don't exist and just live in the real world.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:28 am |
    • cindy

      I couldn't have said it better myself- I will go one step further; if she isn't following the precepts of the Church she ISN"T Catholic! These fake catholics should stop misrepresenting the TRUE catholic beliefs and the reasons behind them.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:29 am |
    • A.very.old.Catholic

      Like the author, I was raised a Catholic. Eight years of Dominican nuns and four years at a Jesuit high school, in the 50s and 60s when there were nuns and priests teaching at these schools. There is only one problem with your statement "leave true Catholics to following the Lord." There is a difference between biblical principles and church doctrines. The latter are made by humans, fallible humans despite their self-serving claims of being infallible. It is fascinating that the most ultra-conservative Christians constantly claim that they prayed to God for guidance in their bigoted, prejudiced actions but when someone else of faith prays and comes to a conclusion different from theirs, they are dismissed as the anti-Christ. How many people on this planet have AIDS because they believed the teachings about condoms; how many unwanted children have been abused because their parent(s) bought the argument about the evil of contraception. Until the churches of this world, Catholic included, actually start caring about people and not doctrine they will constantly face this push back from people who can think and reason.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:30 am |
    • rlowens1

      I don't demand that any particular religious faith change. I laugh and point at all of them – along with the sheep who apparently need their guidance.

      Religion is for those who would have others tell them how they should act, think, feel, and believe, That is counterfeit spirituality. True spirituality is figuring those things out for yourself.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:32 am |
    • sparknut

      "A.very.old.Catholic" is a very wise Catholic!

      February 11, 2012 at 10:41 am |
    • kendallpeak

      averyoldcatholic. The Church is older and wiser than you. But, once again, if you find their teachins unacceptable, simply quit calling yourself Catholic.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:48 am |
    • nolapearl

      A.very.old.catholic is a very wise man (or woman) indeed..

      February 11, 2012 at 10:51 am |
  19. Lorem

    Catholics. We are so busy keeping our children away from their priests, we quit listening long ago. They have made themselves socially irrelevant. Nobody cares what the Catholic point of view is about. Catholics themselves don't care what their point of view is about, but they mouth words and ask us to listen. Of course they have the right to say whatever they'd like. But nobody cares, really.

    February 11, 2012 at 10:15 am |
    • mduerler

      We are a lot busier keeping our kids away from the occupy wall street gang. The have committed more crimes in a week than all the priest put together.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:20 am |
    • George

      bigot

      February 11, 2012 at 10:24 am |
  20. Rideitout

    When all the rules were drafted by the church, how many women sat in on it?

    Worst religions for women:

    1. Islam (Taliban)
    2. Catholicism

    February 11, 2012 at 10:14 am |
    • Irishcat

      No one is forced into a religion....if it doesn't work for you, find one that does!

      February 11, 2012 at 10:17 am |
    • Connie

      I'm Catholic, a feminist, a woman and quite happy. I think you grouping Islam and the Taliban as the same shows how cultured you are. Get on a plane visit a few countries (take vacations other than to disney world). A little worldliness goes a long way.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:21 am |
    • rlowens1

      "God" is merely a power play. It is an attempt to steal the authority of an all powerful being. It matters not whether that being actually exists. What matters is that people believe He exists and that certain people speak/spoke for Him. Don't fall for it.

      As for myself, if there is such a thing as a "God" and He has anything to say to me, I have FAITH that He knows where I am and how to say it so I know it is really Him. Therefore, I ignore ALL the clowns who pretend to speak for Him – especially, if they lived and died thousands of years ago.

      And, religion is for those who would have others tell them how they should act, think, feel, and believe, That is counterfeit spirituality. True spirituality is figuring those things out for yourself.

      As long as there are those who would have others tell them how they should act, think, feel, and believe, there will be religions – and, those exploiting them for their own agendas.

      God believers fail to realize that, regardless of whether "God" (whatever that is) exists, or not, "it" will ALWAYS be a construct in their imagination that they created for themselves. And, "God" doesn't have to be anything like that. So, it's just an imaginary friend.

      February 11, 2012 at 10:21 am |
    • Nii Croffie

      Hmm so true religion for you is self-imposed selective ignorance. Very bright. Nobel Prize Award deserved.*clapping 4 u*

      February 11, 2012 at 10:26 am |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.