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Terminated employee claims bias against intelligent design
NASA's Cassini space probe snapped this photo of jets spewing from Saturn's moons.
March 13th, 2012
10:08 PM ET

Terminated employee claims bias against intelligent design

By Stan Wilson, CNN

Los Angeles (CNN) - A former veteran systems administrator for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory claimed during opening arguments in a civil lawsuit Tuesday that he was wrongfully terminated for expressing his views on intelligent design.

David Coppedge, who spent 15 years on the Cassini Mission, one of NASA and JPL's most ambitious planetary space explorations, asserts that he was unlawfully fired under his employer's anti-harassment and ethics policies. JPL contends Coppedge created a hostile workplace while expressing his religious views with co-workers.

His suit also claims that supervisors wrongly admonished him for distributing DVD documentary films titled "Unlocking the Mystery of Life" and "The Privileged Planet," which present biological and cosmological explanations for intelligent design, according to the complaint.

Coppedge claims he never forcibly compelled colleagues to accept his idea of intelligent design in the workplace. Intelligent design is a conviction that life is too complex to have developed solely through evolution and that the universe was designed by an intelligent entity.

CNN's Belief Blog – all the faith angles to the day's top stories

JPL, based in Pasadena, California, is one of the world's most prestigious institutions for scientific research and development institutions. In Coppedge's civil lawsuit, he describes JPL's space missions as designed, in part, to explore the origin of the universe, uncover whether life exists elsewhere in the universe - or is improbably confined to earth - and whether conditions necessary for life to exist reside elsewhere in the universe.

Launched in October 1997, the Cassini mission to Saturn included a sophisticated robotic spacecraft that orbited the ringed planet and provided streams of data about its rings, magnetosphere, moon Titan and icy satellites. Cassini was the largest interplanetary mission ever launched, with the largest technical staff and participation of 18 countries.

In his role, Coppedge was responsible for making technical and scientific recommendations to management and developing presentations about various technical capabilities of new systems and upgrades, his attorney William Becker Jr. said during opening arguments. During his tenure, Coppedge developed a "sincere interest in the scientific evidence behind life's origin," which led to his conviction about "intelligent design."

Coppedge shared the view that life and the existence of the universe derived not from "undirected material processes," but from "intelligent cause," said attorney Becker.

In March 2009, Coppedge claims that his supervisor advised him that co-workers had complained that he was harassing them over debates about his religious views and coercing them in the workplace into watching DVD programs about intelligent design. During his opening statements Tuesday, attorney Becker Jr. told a judge hearing the case that Coppedge's supervisor threatened him with termination if he "pushed his religion" and ordered Coppedge to refrain from discussing politics or religion with anyone in the office.

During that 2009 meeting, Coppedge alleges, his supervisor became angry and belligerent asserting that "intelligent design is religion" and ordered him to stop. "The tone of the meeting and conduct were abusive and constituted harassment," his attorney said in court.

JPL spokeswoman Veronica McGregor said the lawsuit "is completely without merit, and we intend to vigorously fight the allegations raised by Mr. Coppedge."

In their response to the civil suit, attorneys for JPL stated in court documents that one of Coppedge's co-workers complained to his supervisor that Coppedge made her feel so uncomfortable in discussing "non work related topics" that it bordered on harassment. The supervisor encouraged Coppedge to limit his discussions about topics like religion and politics to periods like lunch breaks, according to the response.

The documents state that other co-workers complained they also felt harassed when Coppedge expressed views in favor of California Proposition 8, the ballot initiative in 2010 that defined marriage between and man and woman.

"David Coppedge alienated his co-workers by the way he acted with them, and blamed anyone who complained about those interactions," according to JPL in their response. "He accuses his former project supervisor and line manager of making discriminatory and retaliatory employment decision, when they had in fact protected him for years."

JPL alleged that Coppedge "was seen as stubborn, unwilling to listen and always having to do things his way, which frustrated project members and resulted in errors."

Coppedge was demoted after eight years as lead systems administrator and terminated last year. He cited those actions as a factor in basis for his suit claiming religious discrimination, retaliation, harassment and wrongful demotion.

JPL has denied Coppedge's termination complaint, contending he was among 246 employees laid off as part of a downsizing plan that affected 300 staffers.

"JPL complies with all applicable state and federal employment laws including laws governing freedom of expression," said JPL spokeswoman McGregor.

California Institute of Technology operates JPL, which is federally funded under a contract with NASA. Scientists are employed by the Caltech.

The case has generated interest among advocates of intelligent design. The Alliance Defense Fund, a Christian civil rights group, and the Discovery Institute, a proponent of intelligent design, are supporting Coppedge's lawsuit. The National Center for Science Education, which supports the teaching of evolution in public education, is closely monitoring the case.

Coppedge is seeking damages for wrongful termination, including attorney fees. The nonjury trial is expected to last four weeks.

*An earlier headline for this article identified David Coppedge as a scientist. His attorney later said that despite his technical work with computers, he is not a scientist.

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Belief • Christianity • Culture & Science • Science

soundoff (2,244 Responses)
  1. m derosa

    I find it hard to believe that Nature created mathematics. Math can and is used to explain much of what we see and experience in our universe. I cannot see how the random chaos of the last 13.7 billion years has spawned mathematics.

    March 14, 2012 at 9:52 am |
    • ohnugget001

      Human beings created mathmatics. If there is something more profound to learn from your post, please specify.

      March 14, 2012 at 10:03 am |
    • tacc2

      Huh? Nature did not create mathematics (except for maybe in a round about sort of way), man did. Math is simply a way for humans to describe and predict things and events in the natural universe.

      March 14, 2012 at 10:23 am |
  2. Mennoknight

    The religion of Atheism Speaks.
    Oh wait did you know that Isaac Newton was a believer too who wrote lots of Christianity. Lets kick him out.

    March 14, 2012 at 9:52 am |
    • Bob

      Menno,

      Atheism is no more a religion than not collecting stamps is a hobby.
      Atheism is no more a religion than bald is a hair color.

      And as for "wrote lots of Christianity", actually, more not just "lots". Humans wrote ALL of Christianity. The whole silly religion is plainly man-made as is its sky fairy. This is plainly obvious when you look at all the absurdities of the bible, including your "loving" god's demands for animal sacrifice, and guidances to do rape and murder, along with all the round-flat earth contradictions.

      Ask the questions. Break the chains. Be free of religion in 2012.
      http://whywontgodhealamputees.com/

      March 14, 2012 at 10:01 am |
    • Mennoknight

      Hey Bob, they why do you act like you guys are religious nuts then?

      March 14, 2012 at 10:28 am |
  3. Just me

    seems to me he was fired for not wanting education materials pertaining to his job.

    March 14, 2012 at 9:52 am |
  4. TiredODaCrap

    So cute to see all the love and acceptance on the posts here bashing God and religion. Good to know that you all are the intelligent, understanding, and tolerant people of the world. If anything, it just shows how each side on this issue fears the very thought of possiblyl being wrong.
    I do find it funny that the "intelligent" people think that little green men definitely exist, but there is no way that there is no possible way that a creator could.

    March 14, 2012 at 9:52 am |
    • Fallacy Spotting 101

      Root post represents both a False Analogy fallacy and a Straw Man argument.

      http://www.iep.utm.edu/fallacy/#H6

      March 14, 2012 at 9:55 am |
    • Grampa

      That's okay, Tired. We find you kind of funny too.

      March 14, 2012 at 9:57 am |
  5. JoeT

    Our civic duty is to remember that no employer (outside a religious order) should be able to terminate an employment based on an individual's belief, except where those beliefs consistently prevent that person from doing his job. It is also unlikely that in this case, the employee's beliefs created conflict in his work– i.e., calculating vectors of thrust or making engineering decisions on a device are usually quite separate from ascribing to a particular creation myth. If this person's job required expertise in xenobiology, then perhaps it would be a case where religious belief would conflict with job performance, but that doesn't seem to hold.

    Now.. that being said - no one likes working with a crank, especially an angry and self-righteous crank. I have little doubt that NASA will show that this person created unnecessary stress in the work environment. It is also likely he was placed on the short list, i.e., if cuts had to be made, where would they be made. In a sense, he was targeted, but no more so than other people who are a burden on their coworkers, and not strictly for his religious beliefs– just his self-righteousness.

    At this point, the best outcome for this case would for it to drain the coffers of the religious reactionaries so that their assault on privacy and reproductive rights is blunted.

    March 14, 2012 at 9:51 am |
  6. denny

    President Santorum will put an end to the lies about evolution and aliens. The only true science is in the Bible.

    March 14, 2012 at 9:51 am |
    • Bob

      /s.

      There, denny, added the sarcasm tag you forgot.

      March 14, 2012 at 9:52 am |
    • Bobs your uncle

      Im going to take that as you making a joke since you cant be serious.

      March 14, 2012 at 9:52 am |
    • intothemoonbeam

      Hey Denny, those who don't value science value ignorance, that includes Santorum.

      March 14, 2012 at 10:07 am |
    • Grampa

      Now let's just be clear. This is the same Bible that smugly tells us that the sun goes around the Earth (Joshua 10:12-14), that the value of Pi is 3 (I Kings 7:23), that rabbits chew their cud (Leviticus 11:5-6), that the Earth doesn't move (Psalms 93:1), and that the Earth is flat and has "ends" (various verses in Deuteronomy and others)?

      Believe whatever myths you want to, Denny. The rest of us will learn our science from books by authors who actually knew what they were talking about.

      March 14, 2012 at 12:32 pm |
  7. John D

    Well, this sounds like it'll turn on the facts.

    He's saying they terminated him for his religious beliefs, they're saying he was harassing people.
    I haven't seen his employment contract, obviously, but harassment is likely "cause," and "religious beliefs"... Well, probably aren't.

    So there isn't really an interesting legal issue here.
    It'll all come down to whose factual allegations the judge chooses to believe.

    March 14, 2012 at 9:50 am |
  8. willy

    So, if someone believes something different then the generally accepted beliefs then he or she has to be wrong. Man, I'm glad the earth isn't flat anymore. I'd worry about falling off.

    March 14, 2012 at 9:50 am |
  9. Ethan

    I am a Christian and I have worked with many people of belief, including other Christians. Most of us keep our beliefs to ourselves. However i have worked with a few Christians who felt they had to convince everyone around them of their belief. Further, they judged everyone by how 'holy' they were. You cannot believe how annoying and unproductive that makes someone. For me, as a Christian, it was especially irritating because it wasn't even a case of 'try this', it was a case of 'you not doing this as good as me.' Everyone cut a wide path around these guys (two of them, seperate situations) and no one wanted to work with them, even though, when they shut up, they were actually quite capable workers.

    March 14, 2012 at 9:50 am |
  10. tacc2

    I'd fire this guy too. Any "scientist" that would buy the intelligent design argument is obviously lacking some critical analytic skills. It also sounds like, on top of being unable to reason, this guy was really annoying with trying to push his ideas on others. Good for the JPL.

    March 14, 2012 at 9:49 am |
    • John D

      Well, in fairness, they're not saying they fired him because of his beliefs; they're saying they fired him for harassment.

      ...At any rate, given the nature of the JPL's work, it's unlikely that his views on intellegent design actually impacted his job.

      March 14, 2012 at 9:52 am |
    • bhoffman6

      Amen

      March 14, 2012 at 10:09 am |
  11. Bob Hands

    Einstein believed in God. Do some research, you'll find what I say to be true. He publicly wrote about it in articles. What say you now?

    March 14, 2012 at 9:48 am |
    • tacc2

      If you read Einstein's writings, you'll find the god he believed in is vastly different from the invisible man in the sky god most religious people believe in.

      March 14, 2012 at 9:51 am |
    • Peter

      I'd say that believing in a God has nothing whatsoever to do with Intelligent Design. And the God you somehow think Einstein believed in had no resemblance whatsoever to the christian God.

      March 14, 2012 at 9:53 am |
    • DrJStrangepork

      I don't care what he believed, what you believe, or what this guy believes. You may be right. You may not be right. We would all be better off if people could just keep this part of themselves to themselves. I am sure you don't care what I believe...

      March 14, 2012 at 9:53 am |
    • firewall30

      He didnt believe in god, in fact he once stated... "It was, of course, a lie what you read about my religious convictions, a lie which is being systematically repeated. I do not believe in a personal God and I have never denied this but have expressed it clearly." What say you now?

      March 14, 2012 at 9:54 am |
    • Steve Thomas

      Einstein was not religious; this is an out-and-out fabrication. How many times does this nonsense have to be debunked before people stop telling this lie? In a not-so-well-known letter, Einstein had this to say:

      "The word god is for me nothing more than the expression and product of human weaknesses, the Bible a collection of honourable, but still primitive legends which are nevertheless pretty childish. No interpretation no matter how subtle can (for me) change this."

      So, please stop perpetuating this lie.

      March 14, 2012 at 9:54 am |
    • prufrock

      Yes, Einstein did believe in God. But he read Spinoza, and thought Spinoza's concept of God the correct approach. I suggest you read Spinoza.

      March 14, 2012 at 9:55 am |
    • ohnugget001

      Eisnstein's god was not the "god" people think of when that term is used. To him, and many scientists, the term"god" merely reflects the notion that the universe is governed by laws that we can understand. For example, see "God does not play dice".

      March 14, 2012 at 9:55 am |
    • Hi

      Einstein believed in a pantheistic god. That is a far cry from judeo-christian theistic believes.

      March 14, 2012 at 9:56 am |
    • JohnQuest

      "About God, I cannot accept any concept based on the authority of the Church. As long as I can remember, I have resented mass indocrination. I do not believe in the fear of life, in the fear of death, in blind faith. I cannot prove to you that there is no personal God, but if I were to speak of him, I would be a liar. I do not believe in the God of theology who rewards good and punishes evil. My God created laws that take care of that. His universe is not ruled by wishful thinking, but by immutable laws."

      —W. Hermanns, Einstein and the Poet—In Search of the Cosmic Man (Branden Press, Brookline Village, Mass., 1983), p.132, quoted in Jammer, p.123.

      March 14, 2012 at 9:57 am |
    • Corey

      "It was, of course, a lie what you read about my religious convictions, a lie which is being systematically repeated. I do not believe in a personal God and I have never denied this but have expressed it clearly. If something is in me which can be called religious then it is the unbounded admiration for the structure of the world so far as our science can reveal it. ." – Albert Einstein 1954

      Please be more informed before making blanket statements. If you have a personal faith and it compels you to lead a just, compassionate and accepting life then I admire and respect you for it. Einstein used "God" as a metaphor, and did not accept the existence of the personal, anthropomorphic God of Western Judeochristian-Islamic traditions.

      March 14, 2012 at 10:00 am |
    • JJC

      First, Einstein clearly stated that he did not believe in a personal god. Second, even if he did, just because someone is smart in one area does not make him an authority in all areas. Quit trying to use Einstein to prove your views. You are incorrect with your assertion and it would not matter either way regardless of his views on anything outside of physics.

      March 14, 2012 at 10:00 am |
    • Steve Thomas

      Prufrock,

      I am well familiar with Spinoza. In a 1947 letter, Einstein wrote "IIt seems to me that the idea of a personal God is an anthropomorphic concept which I cannot take seriously. I feel also not able to imagine some will or goal outside the human sphere. My views are near to those of Spinoza: admiration for the beauty of and belief in the logical simplicity of the order and harmony which we can grasp humbly and only imperfectly. I believe that we have to content ourselves with our imperfect knowledge and understanding and treat values and moral obligations as a purely human problem — the most important of all human problems. "

      Christians have now been forced to lie to maintain their dying worldview.

      March 14, 2012 at 10:38 am |
  12. GLM

    Sounds to me like he was canned for being hard to work with and genuinely disruptive, not because of his views.

    March 14, 2012 at 9:48 am |
  13. SANJOSEMIKE

    During my surgical residency at a VA hospital many years ago during the Vietnam War, one of our anesthesiologists was actively against the War and even joined protests. He was highly vocal and critical of the US and its policies and never made a secret of it at work. Even as a surgical resident, he bombarded me with reading materials against the war and even against the US itself. There wasn't much I could do about it, whether I agreed with him or not. Nobody could sit with him for lunch without hearing a tirade.

    He was NEVER disciplined for fired for it. He seemed to revel in his freedom of speech. I am much older now. I can understand why this scientist wanted HIS freedom of speech too. Even as an atheist myself, I tend to gravitate to freedom of speech, even if it offends my atheism.

    Freedom of speech is a bit like religion itself. There is no half-way. Either you believe in it or not.

    sanjosemike

    March 14, 2012 at 9:48 am |
    • phalanx

      Valid point, I believe the underlying issue behind the dismissal was not so much his freedom of speech, but where he chose to express it, disruptive behaviour at work hampering productivity and other people's focus is punishable in just about every place I have worked out. Scientist or not.

      March 14, 2012 at 9:58 am |
  14. Greg s

    Yep Im afraid this fella is doing or in this case was doing, What so many Atheists cant stand and that's peddling his religion at the workplace.

    March 14, 2012 at 9:47 am |
    • Bobs your uncle

      Yeah? Because its work. He should be doing that. Which in this case is science, not religion.

      March 14, 2012 at 9:55 am |
    • ohnugget001

      He was doing what so many people in general can't stand. Don't single us atheist's out as the only harmed party.

      March 14, 2012 at 9:58 am |
    • I'm The Best!

      Not just atheists. Would you care if a Muslim was peddling his religion at your work place? Or a Christian if you're Muslim?

      March 14, 2012 at 10:14 am |
  15. TAK

    Belief in creationism makes him a terrible scientist. Ergo, he's unqualified to work at NASA.

    March 14, 2012 at 9:47 am |
    • Greg s

      He was wrong to push his religious beliefs on his colleagues, That's his mistake as for His belief in God Disqualifying him as a scientists well your ignorant.

      March 14, 2012 at 9:51 am |
    • MrId

      Burn the witch!!!!

      March 14, 2012 at 9:51 am |
  16. fastball

    "Scientist" and "intelligent design" are oxymorons, mutually exclusive, and should never be used in the same sentence.

    March 14, 2012 at 9:45 am |
    • tacc2

      Except maybe the sentence, "No scientist, taking into account all of the facts and applying logical reasoning, could ever conclude that intelligent design is a sound theory."

      March 14, 2012 at 9:54 am |
  17. DeeNYC

    He was pushing his religion around and harassing co-workers he deserved to be fired.

    March 14, 2012 at 9:42 am |
    • TiredODaCrap

      If they are firing those pushing their gay marriage agenda, liberal political agenda, etc, etc, then I agree with you. If others are allowed to live out their beliefs at work, he deserves anything he gets in court.

      March 14, 2012 at 9:45 am |
    • Scott

      100% agreed.

      He can have what views he wants. He can express views. But his actions crossed the line of acceptable work behavior in continually pushing unwanted views on people in subordinate positions. That is a no-no.

      No story here. No case, either.

      March 14, 2012 at 9:48 am |
    • Richard

      Ha! Hypocrisy! NASA is in dire straights and have latched onto the myth of man-made global warming to justify their existence to a science-ignortant administration. Net result is, if you don't tow the global warming line, you get fired. Now, is this any better than what that administrator did? In both cases the science to support it is either non-existent, or so sloppy it would never pass muster in any other scientific investigation.

      March 14, 2012 at 9:51 am |
    • Authority Zero

      Agreed

      March 14, 2012 at 9:56 am |
    • tacc2

      TiredODaCrap: there's a difference between "living out your beliefs" at work and bothering your co-workers about them. I'm a firm supporter of gay rights and marriage. However, I'd fire a gay person if they constantly bothered their co-workers about it.

      March 14, 2012 at 9:58 am |
    • Slick8

      Were you there? Did he "push" his religious views on you? All you care to believe is what JPL lawyers say and if you believe in lawyers ....

      March 14, 2012 at 10:19 am |
    • Authority Zero

      @ Slick8
      Well the lawyers, the co-workers who complained and that fact he admitted to be warned in the past

      March 14, 2012 at 10:25 am |
  18. hippypoet

    look, this is very simple – the idea of a religious scientist is irony spelt out!

    you are biased towards the answers – if you seek the beginning of the universe and believe in god then you are going to look for certain things that prove your stance on the subject. A true scientist allows for any and all possibilities. The answer is always unknown until it is known! Inshort you will twist facts to suit theories instead of theories to suit facts!

    March 14, 2012 at 9:41 am |
    • TiredODaCrap

      And yet your argument implies that those who do not believe in God will be "unbiased" in looking for only the answers? Come on. To make this argument is ridiculus. If a true scientist can believe that there is a no God – and be trusted to investgate with not bias – why couldn't the same be true of one who does believe in God? Oh, I guess that wouldn't fit into your personal belief.

      March 14, 2012 at 9:48 am |
    • Reid

      Hate to break it to you, but that line goes for metaphysical naturalists as much as it does ID'ers....

      March 14, 2012 at 9:51 am |
    • hippypoet

      your a fool, i never said that a scientist shouldn't nor couldn't believe – belief does however make them biased – a non believe is willing to allow other answers in the door alongside the possibility of god...and any True Scientist would allow for the god possibility!

      March 14, 2012 at 9:52 am |
    • Bill

      CNN's Stan Wilson has deliberately misrepresented two key facts of this case in order to sensationalize this non-story, and CNN should be ashamed, not to mention immediately removing this story from publication. First of all, this individual was terminated because he aggressively proselytized about a fundamentally religious belief in the workplace, despite being repeatedly asked to stop. Secondly, this individual is NOT a "scientist" in ANY sense of the word. He was a computer network analyst (basically a glorified systems administrator). His job was to determine how large the computers had to be and how to connect them so they could receive data from one particular NASA spacecraft. He had ZERO scientific charter in his job description, another deliberate falsehood propagated by Stan Wilson to make it sound like NASA was somehow infringing on scientific thinking, which is completely false. These errors are so fundamental to the story that I question Mr. Wilson's journalism credentials and urge them to consider terminating his employment...this author clearly has zero journalistic credibility.

      March 14, 2012 at 9:53 am |
    • Greg s

      Your argument doesn't hold water because if your a Scientist who doesn't believe in god your suddenly UN-biased, Your somehow better, You mean to tell me your not going to ignore some fact that might lean toward the presence of a Higher power, Yea right. Scientists whether believers or not have agendas there Not gods and in some cases there intelligence is questionable. Climate scientists are the worst who claim to be able to tell us what the weather will be in 20 years but cant get what it will be next year, next month or even next week right.

      March 14, 2012 at 9:56 am |
    • hippypoet

      Greg s you must be an idiot... find out the difference between weather and climate!

      March 14, 2012 at 9:57 am |
    • Jen

      TiredODaCrap, which GOD are you talking about?

      March 14, 2012 at 9:58 am |
    • skip

      A true scientist should say they aren't sure about the origins of life. But should be able to say that certain theories are more plausible than others based on scientific evidence.

      March 14, 2012 at 10:03 am |
    • tacc2

      TiredODaCrap: Because belief in god, at least the one you're probably talking about, requires one to ignore the facts. If someone can be confronted with the facts about the non-existence of god and still conclude that god exists based purely on faith, that person's ability to reason can not be trusted.

      March 14, 2012 at 10:03 am |
    • Jim

      I'm not a very religious guy but being a scientist and believing in God are obviously not mutually exclusive. Why can't you have both, as so many scientists do? But believing in God does not mean you DON'T believe in things like evolution, only a small minority believe that (like this scientist, it would appear).

      March 14, 2012 at 10:07 am |
    • tacc2

      Greg s: I find your intelligence questionable, seeing as how you don't seem to know the difference between "there" and "their".

      March 14, 2012 at 10:08 am |
    • tacc2

      Greg s: I didn't even catch the misuse of "your" when you meant "you're". Are you kidding me? Is English not your first language or something?

      March 14, 2012 at 10:11 am |
    • TiredODaCrap

      Tacc(o) – and what "facts" do you have that God does not exist? Back to Hipp – Yet again your responses show the closed-mindedness of those you rail against! You are still saying that a non-believer can accept different conclusions, but a believer cannot?? How is that not exactly why the responses say your post is off????

      March 14, 2012 at 11:53 am |
    • hippypoet

      perhaps you missed a very foundamental part of believing in god... if you believe in god then you believe god created everything and therefore the only things you can seek without a preconceved notion of truth is how things work not why they work or how they got to be here...because you believe in an answer already that is not found in any truth...thats why its called faith – i call it hope!

      that makes a believer biased towards the origins of everything!!!! a.k.a. not a good scientist!

      March 14, 2012 at 12:22 pm |
  19. intothemoonbeam

    Those who don't value science value ignorance.

    March 14, 2012 at 9:40 am |
    • Godfrey

      Are yoo calling god ignorant he even created yoo so he's smart the fool say's in his hart theres no god

      March 14, 2012 at 9:50 am |
    • FactsRBad

      Very well said

      March 14, 2012 at 9:51 am |
    • Godfrey

      Thanks facts r bad we will enliten these fool's yet

      March 14, 2012 at 9:53 am |
    • Bob

      Godfrey, you are apparently ignorant of grammar, among your other mental deficiencies.

      March 14, 2012 at 10:06 am |
    • Godfrey

      Either that or I'm joking.

      March 14, 2012 at 1:11 pm |
  20. The 666

    The father, the Ho and the b@stard son is a psychotic fantasy. This guy was undoubtedly preaching his make believe pie in the sky god and people got fed up him. Belief in god would also make him a pretty lousy scientist. Good job NASA. An improvement would be to take him to outer space and see if his fake god comes to rescue him.

    March 14, 2012 at 9:39 am |
    • Bill

      He wasn't a scientist. He was a basically a computer network administrator. The CNN "reporter" is lying to make a story out of a non-story.

      March 14, 2012 at 9:54 am |
    • Reid

      Or honor his 1st Amendment right. It's funny to see the certainty people have about the falsity of ID, when they are the first to tout the openness of scientific investigation in comparison with the (supposed) biased starting point that Intelligent Design scientist begin with.

      March 14, 2012 at 9:55 am |
    • Authority Zero

      @ Reid
      The first amendment doesn’t apply to the work place Reid. When you are hired you SIGN an employee agreement to follow company rules. Similar to the terms of use for this blog. You have NO right to free speech here. The filter and can remove your post at will.

      March 14, 2012 at 10:04 am |
    • Jim

      Wow, man, such hate! I'm not real big on religion, either, but for anyone with any intelligence, belief in God, some Higher Power, whatever, doesn't mean you can't be a wonderful scientist in the least! Belief in God would NOT make him a "pretty lousy scientist". How do you figure? Lots of scientists in that position. But yeah, you have to make sure you're open to anything and everything.

      March 14, 2012 at 10:11 am |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.