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My Take: Contraception politics makes good works difficult
The author has struggled to get contraception coverage from her Catholic employer.
March 16th, 2012
12:12 PM ET

My Take: Contraception politics makes good works difficult

Editor’s note: The writer was granted anonymity because of concerns this piece could jeopardize her employment.

By Anonymous, Special to CNN

I love the good works my job at a Catholic nonprofit group enables me to do, advocating for the poor, hungry, sick and homeless.

My passion for these issues comes from Catholic social teaching. From my Catholic grammar school to my Catholic high school, I absorbed these teachings into my DNA. As I came into adulthood at a Catholic university, my commitment to social justice guided me.

The most profound declaration of faith I can make is practicing the Catholic teachings about human dignity and about what my faith calls the “preferential option for the poor” in my everyday life.

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My work brings attention to people who don’t have corporate lobbyists representing them in government. I advocate for people too often talked at or about, not to, and never with, by the elite and powerful.

But I’ve come to realize that women are excluded from the Catholic notion of social justice, specifically the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ understanding of social justice.

The bishops don’t understand women or biology. They understand power and control. They have become lobbyists in robes exerting influence in Washington and every state capital.

They are detached from the real life challenges facing women who sit faithfully in their pews, serving their churches, and millions like me who’ve rejected their power and control in order to keep the most important parts of our faith.

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The politically powerful bishops want to control access to contraception, portraying themselves as victims of the new federal healthcare law’s policy that provides free birth control coverage to women.

My work brings me in touch with people for whom the word “victim” has real meaning. The bishops aren’t victims. They’ve created a political charade based on invented threats to religious liberty.

What about my religious liberty and that of my co-workers? Real religious liberty gives everyone the right to make personal decisions, including whether to use birth control, based on our own beliefs.

And what about our health? When a colleague with a cancer-causing condition at my Catholic nonprofit needed contraception for her treatment last year, she didn’t know where to turn. Our employer doesn’t provide access to contraception, and she couldn’t afford the medication. Her condition got worse.

After months of waiting for permission from our employer, she was finally granted contraception coverage, and her condition improved. But she suffered needlessly in the interim.

Another co-worker, we learned, was paying $90 a month out-of-pocket for the contraception she needs to treat her polycystic fibrosis. That’s a significant monthly expense, especially considering “the pill” is the most commonly prescribed drug for women.

HR told us we had to ask permission of the agency’s CEO on a case-by-case basis. It reminded me of when I first got my period at age 12. My cramps were so bad that my pediatrician recommended contraception.

I had to ask my father’s permission. The only difference today is my colleagues and I aren’t young girls; the CEO isn’t our father.

Recently, I learned that I needed contraception for dysmenorrhea, and I thought my work helping my colleagues get contraception coverage meant I would have an easier time.

Instead, I had to explain my personal medical situation to a man in HR, which is embarrassing for any woman.

When I received special permission from the men in control to get medication to take care of my health – to live according to my beliefs – I requested that the agency develop protocols so no one else would have to go through the same humiliating process. The powers that be refused.

In rejecting the Obama administration’s compromise on contraception coverage – which mandates that insurance companies, not religiously affiliated employers, provide free contraception coverage – the church and the bishops find themselves out on a limb politically.

They have twisted religious liberty to mean they can impose their beliefs on others, and it’s taking a toll. The bishops’ rigid thinking caused me to leave the Catholic Church two years ago.

I could do the church’s good works advocating for others, but the only way I could advocate for myself was to leave the church.

I was no longer nourished spiritually. Instead, the spoken and unspoken messages about sexuality, the body and women – especially our inability to serve as clergy – forced me to leave.

Just like the people I advocate for, within the church hierarchy women are talked at and about, not to, and rarely with.

I’m deeply proud of my work representing the poor and dispossessed. I love my job, and the faith I’ve found through my work after leaving the church. I don’t like the thought of having to leave that behind, too.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Catholic Church • Opinion

soundoff (576 Responses)
  1. GIJoe

    How many Bishops, etc., take viagra - and WHY?

    March 17, 2012 at 2:38 pm |
    • kcfq58

      where is your proof

      March 17, 2012 at 2:42 pm |
    • Dubious

      He's asking a question, not making a statement. Learn to read.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:49 pm |
  2. Alan

    For those that hate the Catholic church and continuosly attack – have at it but understand a lot of us are tired of listening to you complain. If you don't like your church or your employer get a new one but quit whinning that they didn't change to satisfy your personal preferences. We live in a country where no one make you work anywhere or attend a specific church ( at least not yet). I have more of a problem leaving my grandchildren with teachers, coaches or a protestant minister than I do a catholic priest. Read the news every day and check the ACCURATE facts and statisticaly they are in more danger in those 3 places than in the Catholic church. The church is not anti-women or anti-man, it has a doctrine that it has been faithful to for 2000 years. If you disagree with or don't understand the Catholic church it is unfortunate but quit making blind baseless attacks based on false information and your belief that somebody has a responsibility to pay for everything you want in life. Start being thankful that you even have an employer that is willing to provide you with insurance!

    March 17, 2012 at 2:29 pm |
    • kcfq58

      Well said my friend

      March 17, 2012 at 2:31 pm |
    • karen

      Well said

      March 17, 2012 at 2:31 pm |
    • Say what?

      I'm catholic, male and proud of most of the church's teachings. But things change, and we the faithful are the driving force behind the change. If you are ignorant enough to believe the Catholic Church has not changed in 2000 years, you have my sympathy. In the last 100 years there have been two Vatican councils that have dramatically changed the role of the laity, Mass and countless other beliefs. A catholic from 200 years ago would not recognize Catholicism today, and we will not recognize it 100 years from now. That’s a good thing, God wants us to grow in faith and understanding, not stagnate in some backward belief system.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:46 pm |
    • Dubious

      You should not have to leave your employer because they won't provide standard health care. Contraceptives are a normal part of health care and have been for a long long time. If you don't believe me, look it up. This is a fabricated political issue, created to wind people like you up before the election.

      If you'd like to go back to the time period that employers could decide what was appropriate and what wasn't for their employees welfare – jump in a time machine and dial it to the mid 1800s. I can hardly believe that our country is having this asinine conversation.

      Finally, the author of this article has a valid point, which you fail to understand. Religious freedom doesn't extend past people's right to health care. Religious freedom doesn't mean you get everything you want. We all pay for things we don't agree with... GROW UP!

      March 17, 2012 at 2:47 pm |
    • Jadugara

      Are you all n.u.t.s?!?!? This was not "well said" at all!

      Alan's "point" had nothing to do with discussion about this article, since the article itself was by no means a "baseless attack" against Catholocism based on "false information"... Instead, it was an informed set of concerns (based on very personal experience in the Catholic Church as a member and as someone who has been through issues derived from current doctrine) about how this recent trend made her lose her ability to remain a Catholic under the c.i.rc.u.m.s.tance that exist today.

      The Catholic Church should listen up, for its own good...and for the good of those who might begin to find that they are less likely to be helped by it than hindered, if this type of stagnant d.o.g.m.a doesn't eventually change.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:48 pm |
    • Joseph

      alan you sure do not sound like the teachings of Jesus....You are probably a Ditto Head.....maybe we should just go back to burning woman like the CC did a few 100 years....what do say Mr. Sunday Catholic!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      March 17, 2012 at 2:54 pm |
  3. JM

    Well-stated.

    March 17, 2012 at 2:22 pm |
  4. pastafaria

    Catholic Bishops do not understand the importance of contraception b/c it is impossible for an adolescent boy to conceive, it's that simple.

    March 17, 2012 at 2:22 pm |
    • Jeb

      pastafaria It really is that simple.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:23 pm |
    • kcfq58

      What happened to Thou shalt not commit adultry ?

      March 17, 2012 at 2:33 pm |
    • AGuest9

      It seems that many priests have forgotten that one.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:54 pm |
  5. Agapatos

    Grumble, grumble.
    You all are the most conceited crowd I've seen around in awhile....
    Who's all about power? Who are the ones that really don't understand? Who's detached from the reality of our faith? Not the bishops. If you had ever taken the time to read the REASONS behind why the church bans contraception, you'd probably admit that they're pretty weighty, meaty arguments. (You can start with, for instance, JPII's book, Love and Responsibility.) You see all you want is quick results . . . fast food . . . But now your spiritual parents are telling you that No, you need REAL food, food like self-control, the natural way, and temperance, which is the only really HEALTHY way.

    (My condolences, though, to the author who wasn't able to obtain contraceptive medications for perfectly legitimate, non-contraceptive purposes. Yes, I agree that she was mistreated.)

    March 17, 2012 at 2:17 pm |
    • Jeb

      Birth control has been the standard of care for many medical conditions and has been included in most health care plans for over 60 years!

      Welcome to the 21st century where you go to a doctor for health care and not your priest.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:19 pm |
    • kcfq58

      Well said

      March 17, 2012 at 2:43 pm |
    • Dubious

      I can't tell if you're trolling or have a learning disability.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:57 pm |
  6. Pha-Q

    @Larvadog: It was never about the taxpayers footing the bill. It was employer mandated health care NOT taxpayer. You're uniformed and therefore your comment is irrelavant.

    March 17, 2012 at 2:16 pm |
  7. Ken

    This debate is a farce and both sides know it. There is zero limitation to The Pill if it is medically necessary and there are plenty of sources to free Pills. This is being used as a war on the Catholic Church and as a way to express hate toward it. If you disagree with the Church and its tenets, leave and go form your own church and cease this foolish diatribe. Moreover, I have a need for regular ongoing necessary medication to keep me alive. I have to pay a co-pay for it yet I'm not demanding that I deserve it for free, this is the hand I was dealt and I handle it like and adult rather than throwing childish tantrums and shrieking about fairness, evil men and the horrible church. It is YOUR life and YOUR responsibility.

    March 17, 2012 at 2:15 pm |
    • Anthony

      @Ken, you have to pay a copay because that's how your insurance coverage works. If not for what the insurance covers, you'd be paying the whole thing. That's what this author, and others, are arguing for: coverage for contraceptives under an insurance plan (which would probably include a copay or deductible, depending on the plan), rather than having to pay the entire cost out of pocket.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:34 pm |
    • kk

      Please state where you can get these free pills. Birth control is not all the same and there is a wide range of cost. So while it is possible that some methods are quite affordable, many are not. And you're not the one being forced to explain your need for medication to your employer. Maybe you're on high blood pressure meds. Tomorrow your employer could decide not to cover those meds because it's against his religious beliefs. Ridiculous? Yes. Improbable? Yes. Impossible? No. The line has to be drawn someplace.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:43 pm |
    • kcfq58

      Amen to that Ken...

      March 17, 2012 at 2:45 pm |
    • AGuest9

      I'm somewhat curious. WHAT health insurance plan DOESN'T cover BC? This seems to a congressional panel looking for a witch hunt to conduct.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:47 pm |
    • Dubious

      Your post is fallacious. The limitations are stated CLEARLY in the article above. Furthermore, they're not the only examples you'll find.

      No one is attacking the Church. They're asking organizations that serve the public good to offer BC as a covered part of health insurance. In the words of the Rolling Stones, "You don't always get what you want." Deal with it.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:53 pm |
    • AGuest9

      kk – try Planned Parenthood (it's been a LONG time since I was in college, but that was the first stop – just don't trust their condoms, unless they've changed suppliers). My family doctor's practice sells several forms of BC pills for $20/month, no insurance.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:58 pm |
    • Ken

      Anthony, thanks for stating the obvious and the instruction about how insurance works. However, the debate, and especially Ms. Fluke who thrust herself into the center of it, is about free contraception. This should point to the foolishness of this topic and all things liberal.

      March 17, 2012 at 6:49 pm |
  8. Jeb

    Your priest is no more qualified to make your health care decisions than your garbage man.

    Birth control has been the standard of care for a variety of health problems and has been included in most health plans for over 60 years now!

    Welcome to the 21st century!

    March 17, 2012 at 2:13 pm |
    • karen

      It is about religious liberty.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:15 pm |
    • Jeb

      karen The majority of people who work for these church owned businesses are not Catholic. They deserve the religious freedom to make choices based on their values and beliefs.

      These church owned businesses should be required to operate under the same rules that all other businesses operate.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:17 pm |
    • karen

      That does not mean that oral contraceptives, sterilizations, or abortifacients should be paid for by the Church. What are the major causes of mortality in the US. It is not painful periods or a desire to not get pregnant. If your desire is to impact healthcare, then direct the president's attention to efforts that will impact their health,...free mammograms, free pap smears, free colonoscopies.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:27 pm |
    • AGuest9

      As noble as they are, free mammograms, free pap smears and free colonoscopies won't stop unwanted children from being born and creating more debt from welfare.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:33 pm |
    • Jadugara

      No, Karen, it's not about "religious liberty" if that religion is trying to limit the liberties of another person...

      Sorry...

      March 17, 2012 at 2:52 pm |
    • karen

      Other persons are not being prohibited from buying their own contraceptives.

      March 18, 2012 at 12:18 pm |
  9. thes33k3r

    Religion is largely about power. If you are a catholic and female then you support a group that works against your own interests. Who else is to blame except for you? You don't have to support these monsters or believe fairy tales to make the world a better place. Leave the church. Vote with your feet.

    March 17, 2012 at 2:08 pm |
    • karen

      I love my Church

      March 17, 2012 at 2:09 pm |
    • Sue

      karen, it's just a crutch for you. You don't need it. Be strong: Let go of it and be free of tyranny of the church over our bodies.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:35 pm |
    • Peter

      You speak for yourself and assume everyone shares your perspective. The answer is each person has to search their soul for the right answer. No person can tell another what faith to follow. Underneath it all that is what this is about. A Catholic organization, Jewish, Hindu, etc has the right in this country to operate per the rules of their faith. America is about religious freedom not requiring by law to voilate your faith, it is absurd to force a Catholic organization to offer birth control.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:39 pm |
    • karen

      Sue, does it frighten you that I stand as a strong woman who makes her own choices and chooses to abide the Churches teachings?

      March 17, 2012 at 2:41 pm |
    • Jadugara

      Karen,...you can "love your church" as much as you wish, as long as no laws are created that force me to follow its dictates... Your church, and its dogma, should be for you and those like you ONLY, and NOT forced down the throats of those who don't love it, care about it, or want to follow its dictates... Working in a job that the church controls doesn't make that job "holy", nor does it make their money-making an endeavor that allows them to control another woman's decisions and body...

      March 17, 2012 at 2:57 pm |
    • Robert CS

      Karen rules!

      March 17, 2012 at 3:58 pm |
    • Ken

      Well that is about the most evil thing I've heard. Do you have horns?

      March 17, 2012 at 4:29 pm |
  10. karen

    You are right...contraception politics do make good works difficult. It is time the media stop portraying this as a contraception debate. And let the Church return to its good works.

    March 17, 2012 at 2:07 pm |
    • Jadugara

      Maybe, Karen, just maybe, it's not "the media" who are making an issue of it... Maybe, just maybe Karen, it's all the other non-brainwahsed women out there who are tired of being told what they can and cannot do WITH THEIR OWN BODIES, by a bunch of men who think they know better, and want to maintain control...

      Free your mind,...the rest will follow...

      March 17, 2012 at 3:00 pm |
    • Dubious

      IT IS A CONTRACEPTION DEBATE!

      I'm sure you'd rather call this a religious freedom debate, although you don't have any basis for that argument.

      March 17, 2012 at 3:00 pm |
    • Ken

      Really? The media portraying it as a contraception issue? Hardly, it is the media that seems to think it is a medical issue which it is not.

      March 17, 2012 at 4:24 pm |
  11. Jeb

    Would any woman go to her priest for a gynecological exam? Of course not! They're not trained or qualified to do that.

    They're also not qualified to make your health care decisions. That's between you and your doctor, not you an your priest.

    March 17, 2012 at 2:04 pm |
    • AGuest9

      In some churches, they do. They also go for legal advice.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:35 pm |
  12. karen

    Unfortunately, there are many organizations giving contraceptives at little or no cost already. So, I don't understand the basis for this article. This is about religious freedom. If you do not agree, find a different employer.

    March 17, 2012 at 2:03 pm |
    • Jeb

      If the Church owns a business that competes against other businesses as is the case here, the church is required to follow the same rules as the businesses it competes against.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:07 pm |
    • Tom

      As long as the hypocrite church takes tax dollars via medicare ans medicaid, while enjoying tax free status, they need to shut their misogynistic mouths. This is really what it is about, the total control of women.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:08 pm |
    • karen

      Tom, this has nothing to do with the control of women. It us about Truth. Please see Humanae Vitae.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:12 pm |
    • Nicole

      Karen, you are delusional and part of the problem. If only people could easily "find another job" whenever some mess happens at work. Take the blinders off.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:16 pm |
    • karen

      Jobs are difficult to come by. I do not disagree. My belief that our First Amendment rights should not be violated does not make me "part of the problem". As I said before, there are plenty of places to get low or no cost contraceptions. This is an attempt of the government to control the Church. Very reminiscent of the Communists.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:21 pm |
    • DH

      What about the 99% of Catholic women who use BC throughout their lives (Guttmacher)? What about their freedom of religion? This is not just an attack on women, but families too. What about the health consequences of multiple births and those relating to our wives aging. This is about empowering our families to have control of their lives and caring for their families. How do you justify the other medical requirements that may or may not be against someone’s faith? This mandate does not require you to change your life or beliefs. This is a secular law voted on by our secular government to allow access to all who need it. It does not require you to use it. It does not require you to use it or change your beliefs.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:24 pm |
    • samantha

      karen, i think you're delusional. you keep rationalizing everything that's wrong with your church. that's exactly what the church leaders want to hear from the people, totally uncontested blind faith in them. you should read about the history of the church and see for yourself that there's nothing divine about the RCC, only a thirst for power and control. for once, please, open your mind and think outside the indoctrination that you are a part of.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:29 pm |
    • AGuest9

      I agree. It's almost creepy to hear stuff like that from several people, almost verbatim. Did they had out a script last Sunday?

      March 17, 2012 at 2:37 pm |
    • karen

      Samantha, I have read about the history of the Church. Unfortunately, people are fallible and there have been horrible atrocities committed by people of many faiths throughout history. I had the opportunity to learn why the Church has its teachings. I would refer you to Theology of the Body.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:37 pm |
    • gh

      @Karen – Come on, Humanae Vitae? This was the writing of a single man (read dictator) and was not generally supported by the church in 1968. It was very controversial by the church.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:41 pm |
    • kk

      The government isn't trying to control the church, the church is trying to control the government. Keep your beliefs off my body and off my choices.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:49 pm |
    • Jadugara

      Hey Karen,...let me give you a little clue about how the rest of the world works, compared to your tiny little world... In the real world, "TRUTH" is something that can be discovered overflowing the shelves of libraries around the globe, filling databases, and opening the minds of millions.... In your little, stunted world, what you think of as "truth" barely fills one little old book, most of which is nothing but myth and legend...

      Maybe you'll do better in your next life...

      March 17, 2012 at 3:05 pm |
    • karen

      Wow, you seem a little. Learning is a beautiful thing. TRUTH is and will be.

      March 17, 2012 at 3:12 pm |
    • Robert CS

      Just Google: Humanae Vitae, there will be many articles to come up. Also, several places that can help one understand this Encyclical Letter of Pope Paul VI, he was way ahead in understanding the relationship that was meant to be ‘in the beginning’ between a man and a woman. Read, understand, find much consolation. Also go to EWTN's home page and find much information.

      March 17, 2012 at 4:27 pm |
  13. SuperFanOf God

    That's because God wants you to suffer, if you pray harder then the diseases will go away.

    March 17, 2012 at 2:02 pm |
  14. Jeb

    Would anyone here leave their child alone with a Catholic priest?

    If you can't trust the church with your children, why would you trust them to make your health care decisions?

    March 17, 2012 at 2:00 pm |
    • karen

      I would.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:08 pm |
    • Jay

      Besides this being completely off topic and irrelevant, a few incidents do not make the whole church. I served in the Catholic Church under at least 8 different priests as a child never once to be harmed.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:24 pm |
    • AGuest9

      Not any more. When I was in grade school, we had one at our church, and at the church where my youngest sister attended grade school, there was another. Both are serving time.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:40 pm |
    • Peter

      I do and know the priest well enough so that as a perent I am comfortable and responsible to protect my child to the utmost.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:46 pm |
    • Dubious

      On this particular point, I'm going to agree with the crazies. You can't paint all priests with the same brush. Most religious leaders are wonderful people – despite my own personal reservations about their faith.

      March 17, 2012 at 3:04 pm |
  15. Thor_walk_the road

    I quit the Catholic church years ago because they do not value the female, and instead do all they can to repress, oppress and devalue us. I just decided that they could keep their repression and archaic rules. The same church that burned women at the stake has not made a whole lot of progress. Priests should not control your healthcare choices, period, end of story.

    March 17, 2012 at 1:57 pm |
  16. Sean

    Mind you I don't support the church or the right wing zealots at all on this topic, and fully support a woman's right regarding her own health care needs. why would anyone allow a co-worker to ('After months of waiting for permission from our employer, she was finally granted contraception coverage, and her condition improved. But she suffered needlessly in the interim)' suffer and not get together or as one help her as one to pay for her prescription if she desperately needed it for her medical condition. Regardless how tight my household budget might be, I would offer assistance and complain to the powers that be. I've had to work at companies that were owned by fundamentalists and had to tolerate prayers at company meetings, that went against my personal beliefs. In one case, I had to quit a job I made good money at, because it was non stop daily drone of religion. As a veteran from 45 years ago I no longer have the wherewithal to stand up to this non sense, but this country is definitely marching backwards in time. Soon, we'll relive the Scopes trials again!

    March 17, 2012 at 1:56 pm |
  17. Jem4016

    Employers make health care decisions all the time for their employees. Do they offer eye care insurance or leave it to the employee. Do they offer dental or leave it to their employee. They aren't saying you can't go to the dentist or the optometrist, they are saying that they just won't pay for it. These businesses make this type of decision on bottom line. The Catholic run businesses are making the decision upon religious beliefs.

    If you don't like the fact your employer doesn't offer dental, find one that does. If you don't like the fact your employer won't cover contraceptives find one that does.

    March 17, 2012 at 1:52 pm |
    • larvadog

      A perfect answer, Jem. I would only add that choice also does not obligate the taxpayers to foot the bill, either.

      March 17, 2012 at 1:58 pm |
    • Ed

      Right, because everyone knows that finding another job is a piece of cake.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:07 pm |
    • Ash

      It's completely different and I can only hope you are NOT a woman because that would be sad & pathetic. Any woman would know that going to the eye doctor and going to your gynecologist are TOTALLY DIFFERENT. Having to walk into your bosses office and explain things about your body that even your boyfriend may not know is completely ridiculous. It's also incredibly offensive that people out there will just say "Go find another job" OK, how about the men out there "go find another job" when they want things like their erectile dysfunction looked at? They should also be required to speak to their female bosses that they can't get it up and want a pill for it. Or perhaps we should just tell them..."Go find another job". It only seems fair.

      March 17, 2012 at 2:17 pm |
    • Dubious

      Confined to this particular issue, perhaps you can convince some people that you have some kind of wiggle room, but the logic you're advocating has terrible consequences for the public good. We cannot allow employers to ration out health care based on religious beliefs. Besides, did you even read the medically necessary reasons women need BC?

      Furthermore, saying the BC and dental insurance are the same is silly. But, if you want to go down this road, fine. Then do what employers do who deny coverage to vision and dental, expecting their employees to find it on the market – give them the money to do it. I'm sure this debate could be solved if the Church would create a generous BC stipend for women.

      March 17, 2012 at 3:08 pm |
  18. Arthur Paliden

    You know if Obama had just told the Catholic church to grow up and join the 21 C he would have gained more votes than he would have lost.

    March 17, 2012 at 1:49 pm |
  19. The way it is

    "The bishops don’t understand women... They understand power and control."

    You forgot to mention money.

    All of the above is true for any organized religious group.

    March 17, 2012 at 1:48 pm |
  20. Jeb

    GodsPeople What specific evidence to you have of your crazy accusations? Stop parroting liars and start thinking for yourself.

    March 17, 2012 at 1:46 pm |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.