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May 2nd, 2012
04:28 AM ET

Belief Blog's Morning Speed Read for Wednesday, May 2

By Laura Koran, CNN

Here's the Belief Blog’s morning rundown of the top faith-angle stories from around the United States and around the world. Click the headlines for the full stories.

From the Blog:

CNN: House candidate and rising GOP star is black, female – and Mormon
To call Mia Love a minority is an understatement. She’s a black woman who won an upset primary race to become the Republican candidate in Utah’s 4th Congressional District. If elected, she’d be the first black Republican congresswoman in the House of Representatives. Love, who has attracted lots of national Republican support, also stands out because of her religion: She’s a Mormon.

Tweet of the Day:

From @EWTN: Residue of 2,000 year-old ointments found on Shroud of Turin: Valencia, Spain, May 1, 2012 / 05:02 pm ... http://bit.ly/KGwdq4 #Catholic
Belief on TV:

Enlightening Reads:

Religion News Service: Study shows Mormonism is fastest-growing faith in half of U.S. states
Mitt Romney may or may not become the first Mormon to move into the White House next year, but a new study shows that Mormonism is moving into more parts of the country than any other religious group, making it the fastest-growing faith in more than half of U.S. states.

National Catholic Reporter: ‘Loose canon’ on annulments may get tighter
A Rome conference in late April hinted that the Vatican may be moving towards a more restrictive posture on annulments, the procedure in church law for declaring a marriage null and void, which some critics refer to as “Catholic divorce.” If so, the fallout could have special significance for the United States, home to just 6 percent of the world’s Catholic population but accounting for roughly two-thirds of the 60,000 annulments issued by church courts each year.

Religion News Service: United Methodists vote to end guaranteed clergy appointments
In a move that will give bishops more flexibility to remove ineffective pastors, the United Methodist Church voted on Tuesday (May 1) to end guaranteed clergy appointments. Clergy appointments have been guaranteed since the 1950s, when they were instituted to protect ministers from discrimination or arbitrary abuse, supporters say. But critics say those original goals have helped mediocre clergy retain their posts. A commission studying the appointments said a more “nimble” process was necessary.

The Christian Post: Atheists Motivated by Compassion, Believers by Doctrine When It Comes to Giving?
A new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley suggests that compassion motivates the non-religious more so than people of faith when it comes to helping others in need, and that religious people may instead be compelled to action by doctrinal beliefs.

Excerpt of the Day:

The National Day of Reason celebrates the application of reason and the positive impact it has had on humanity. It is also an opportunity to reaffirm the Constitutional separation of religion and government […] I encourage everyone to join in observing this day and focusing upon the employment of reason, critical thinking, the scientific method, and free inquiry to improve our world and our nation.

Rep. Pete Stark, the only member of the U.S. Congress who has publicly stated that he does not believe in a supreme being, on Thursday’s National Day of Reason. The National Day of Reason is the secular community’s response to the National Day of Prayer, which also takes place on May 3rd. Read Rep. Stark’s full statement here.

Join the conversation…

CNN: Columnist Dan Savage stands by comments on 'bulls**t in the Bible'
Columnist and gay-rights advocate Dan Savage is standing by his comment that “we can learn to ignore the bulls**t in the Bible about gay people” at a recent conference for high school students, a line that prompted some to walk out and spurred intense online debate.

- CNN's Laura Koran

Filed under: Uncategorized

soundoff (20 Responses)
  1. Atheism is not healthy for children and other living things

    Prayer changes things.

    May 2, 2012 at 6:38 pm |
    • Jesus

      -Prayer doesn’t not; you are such a LIAR. You have NO proof it changes anything! A great example of prayer proven not to work is the Christians in jail because prayer didn't work and their children died. For example: Susan Grady, who relied on prayer to heal her son. Nine-year-old Aaron Grady died and Susan Grady was arrested.

      An article in the Journal of Pediatrics examined the deaths of 172 children from families who relied upon faith healing from 1975 to 1995. They concluded that four out of five ill children, who died under the care of faith healers or being left to prayer only, would most likely have survived if they had received medical care.

      The statistical studies from the nineteenth century and the three CCU studies on prayer are quite consistent with the fact that humanity is wasting a huge amount of time on a procedure that simply doesn’t work. Nonetheless, faith in prayer is so pervasive and deeply rooted, you can be sure believers will continue to devise future studies in a desperate effort to confirm their beliefs!-

      May 3, 2012 at 11:18 am |
  2. AGuest9

    "compassion motivates the non-religious more so than people of faith"

    Of course it does! The carrot ALWAYS works better than the stick, or as the wise old saying goes, "You will catch more flies with honey than vinegar."

    May 2, 2012 at 10:01 am |
    • KRAKIN

      & your points are?

      May 2, 2012 at 11:24 am |
    • momoya

      @Krakin

      I'm guessing it was that whole "carrot works better than stick" point, seeing as it was the only one in the post.

      May 2, 2012 at 11:34 am |
    • Qwerty Elemeno

      Yes. That is because atheist morality is based on the world around us, and not obedience to some abstract ideology.

      Think about it: Is it better to help someone because you feel compassion for them and do it for no reason than the satisfaction of making the world a slightly better place, or is it better to do it because God wants you to and you expect it to help yo get into heaven?

      May 2, 2012 at 11:54 am |
    • J.W

      Nobody actually helps people because they think it will help them get into heaven. That is a myth.

      May 2, 2012 at 1:07 pm |
    • Freenow

      J.W , I'm calling bs on you. You can't say brainless crap like that and expect to get away with it!
      You don't know why everyone does every little thing!
      Retract that or not. Your choice.

      May 2, 2012 at 1:42 pm |
    • lunchbreaker

      @ J.W, I wouldn't go so far as to say "nobody", but most Christians I know do believe you are saved by accepting Jesus, and after salvation your "works" have no bearing on your entrance into heaven. BUt the Bible says they will have to account for said works, so it still boils down to fear of reproach. Maybe you don't burn forever, but no body wants God to shake that finger at them.

      May 2, 2012 at 1:47 pm |
    • God's Oldest Dreamer

      J.W,,,,,,,,,,,, ,

      Nobody's anybody may never be anybody's nobody! The straw least drawnd upon is the one that is least bent!

      May 2, 2012 at 2:05 pm |
  3. Critical Thinking

    Can't be found in that old Book.

    May 2, 2012 at 9:56 am |
  4. Glimmer

    I hereby nominate Rep. Stark for President!

    May 2, 2012 at 7:21 am |
  5. Atheism is not healthy for children and other living things

    Prayer changes things

    May 2, 2012 at 5:33 am |
    • TruthPrevails :-)

      All it changes is your ability to solve issues on your own.

      May 2, 2012 at 6:10 am |
    • Landlubber

      @TruthPrevails

      Oooh! Good one! Use that one more often! Shout it from the rooftops! You've hit the nail on the goddm head!

      May 2, 2012 at 10:30 am |
    • Jesus

      Prayer doesn’t not; you are such a LIAR. You have NO proof it changes anything! A great example of prayer proven not to work is the Christians in jail because prayer didn't work and their children died. For example: Susan Grady, who relied on prayer to heal her son. Nine-year-old Aaron Grady died and Susan Grady was arrested.

      An article in the Journal of Pediatrics examined the deaths of 172 children from families who relied upon faith healing from 1975 to 1995. They concluded that four out of five ill children, who died under the care of faith healers or being left to prayer only, would most likely have survived if they had received medical care.

      The statistical studies from the nineteenth century and the three CCU studies on prayer are quite consistent with the fact that humanity is wasting a huge amount of time on a procedure that simply doesn’t work. Nonetheless, faith in prayer is so pervasive and deeply rooted, you can be sure believers will continue to devise future studies in a desperate effort to confirm their beliefs!

      May 2, 2012 at 10:39 am |
    • Mog-ur

      Prayer is the murmuring of billions of delusional primates as they seek to speak with their delusions.

      May 2, 2012 at 1:48 pm |
    • Mog-ur

      Oops! Mog-ur not want to speak hard! Here I say again. Better.

      Prayers give nothing! No one is there! You are like a rabid skunk that chatters at a tree!

      May 2, 2012 at 2:05 pm |
    • Atheism is not healthy for children and other living things

      Prayer changes things
      Proven

      May 2, 2012 at 6:37 pm |
    • Jesus

      No, you're a proven LIAR! Prayer doesn’t not You have NO proof it changes anything! A great example of prayer proven not to work is the Christians in jail because prayer didn't work and their children died. For example: Susan Grady, who relied on prayer to heal her son. Nine-year-old Aaron Grady died and Susan Grady was arrested.

      An article in the Journal of Pediatrics examined the deaths of 172 children from families who relied upon faith healing from 1975 to 1995. They concluded that four out of five ill children, who died under the care of faith healers or being left to prayer only, would most likely have survived if they had received medical care.

      The statistical studies from the nineteenth century and the three CCU studies on prayer are quite consistent with the fact that humanity is wasting a huge amount of time on a procedure that simply doesn’t work. Nonetheless, faith in prayer is so pervasive and deeply rooted, you can be sure believers will continue to devise future studies in a desperate effort to confirm their beliefs!-

      May 3, 2012 at 11:18 am |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.