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My Take: Dear God: How to pray on National Day of Prayer?
President Barack Obama praying at a White House Easter event in April.
May 3rd, 2012
09:51 AM ET

My Take: Dear God: How to pray on National Day of Prayer?

Editor's Note: Stephen Prothero, a Boston University religion scholar and author of "God is Not One: The Eight Rival Religions that Run the World," is a regular CNN Belief Blog contributor.

By Stephen Prothero, Special to CNN

Dear Deity,

In the Milky Way, on planet Earth, in the United States of America, Thursday is our National Day of Prayer, so I am writing to ask You how to pray.

Seventy eight percent or so of U.S. citizens are Christians, so should we pray today to the Christian God? This seems to be the conviction of the folks at the National Day of Prayer Task Force, which pops up first if you Google “National Day of Prayer.” (By the way, do You Google, God? And if so do you ever Google "God"?)

The NDP Task Force refers to itself as “Judeo-Christian,” but it sure looks evangelical to me. It has been chaired since 1991 by Shirley Dobson, the wife of Focus on the Family founder (and evangelical stalwart) James Dobson. Its site quotes liberally from the New Testament, and one of its goals is to “foster unity within the Christian Church.”

A NDP Task Force press release begins: “Americans to Unite and Pray on Thursday, May 3rd, for the 61st Annual Observance of the National Day of Prayer." But will their sort of prayer really unite our nation?

Twenty four percent of Americans are Catholics, and God knows they don’t pray the way evangelicals do. Nearly 2% are Mormons and another 2% are Jews. And neither of those groups talks to You with the easy familiarity of born-again Christians.

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And what about American Hindus and Muslims and Buddhists?  Muslims agree with their Jewish and Christian neighbors that there is one God. But how to pray as a nation when some believers affirm more than one God and some affirm fewer?

As You obviously know, the 1.6% of Americans who call themselves atheists and the 2.4% who call themselves agnostics refer to today as the National Day of Reason. On their web site, they argue that our National Day of Prayer represents an unwanted and unconstitutional intrusion of religion into the workings of the U.S. government.

In his various proclamations of the National Day of Prayer, including this year's, President Obama has referred to prayer as an important part of U.S. history. He speaks of the Continental Congress and Abraham Lincoln and Martin Luther King, Jr. being driven to their knees by the force of the tasks set before them.

But when our national icons have prayed on our behalf, they have done so in generic terms. Washington addressed “the Almighty”; Jefferson called on “that Infinite Power.” They did so because they wanted prayer to unite us, not to divide us, and they knew from the start that different Americans call You by different names.

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But addressing “Providence” in vague pieties will not satisfy everyone either. The evangelicals at the NPD Task Force reject efforts to “homogenize” America’s many different ways of praying into one common prayer.

I see their point. Like language, religion is a specific sort of thing. If you are going to speak, you need to choose a language. If you are going to pray, you need to choose a religion (and a god). So if they want to pray to the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, more power to them.

But what happens when that particular prayer language is put forth as our collective national language? What happens when we pray, as Rick Warren did at President Obama’s inaugural, “in the name of the one who changed my life, Yeshua, Isa, Jesus”? Then prayer turns into a wedge, dividing those who call you Christ from those who call You Krishna (or do not call on You at all).

So I return to my original question: How should we pray on this National Day of Prayer?

But while I have Your attention (do I?) I have one more.

This year the NDP Task Force has chosen for its theme “One Nation Under God” and its Bible quote is: “Blessed is the nation whose God is the Lord” (Psalms 33:12). Is our god You? Since 1954 we have bragged in our Pledge of Allegiance that we are "one nation under God." Are we?

All too often, it seems to me, we use You rather than following You. Democrats ask You to shill for them on tax policy and immigration. Republicans claim to speak in Your name on abortion and gay marriage. Does this annoy You — playing the pawn in our political chess games? Don't You sometimes just want to smite us?

Finally, before I let you go, I must ask You about the marginal tax rate for the wealthiest Americans. Perhaps You have more important things on your plate, but while I have Your attention (do I?) I must ask: What portion of their income should millionaires pay to the U.S. government? When President Kennedy came into office the highest income tax rate was 91%. Was that too high? Today it is 35%. Is that too low? (Just curious.)

This prayer is already too long, so I should stop. But if You are still there (are You?) maybe you could just tell me whether You follow the Roman Catholic Church. If so, could you comment on the recent fight the Vatican has been picking with American nuns? Do you think our nuns should be spending more time fighting contraception and less time caring for the poor and the sick?

And do get back to me on that how to pray thing. We’re all supposed to do it on Thursday, together.

Sincerely,

Steve

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Stephen Prothero.

- CNN Belief Blog contributor

Filed under: Barack Obama • Catholic Church • Christianity • Politics • Prayer • Uncategorized • United States

soundoff (4,673 Responses)
  1. R Burns

    The great majority of Americans identify as Christian, but that doesn't put them all on the same "page." The National Day of Prayer is meant to encourage citizens to pray – as Christians, as Muslims, as Jews, as members of other philosophies, but to pray nevertheless. Even atheists practise their own form of "religion" by being so adamant about their doctrine of non-belief. Maybe they will just meditate. Nothing about a National Day of Prayer violates anyboday's religious freedom, in fact it encourages us all to focus and exercise that right.

    May 3, 2012 at 4:27 pm |
  2. Suzie

    The world has soo many old religions and the core of them is the same.. do onto others what you will want done to you, there are a guidelines to live your life being the best possible person you can be. Now we can choose to focus of the positives and similarities and live by loving one another.. or to focus on the differences and make political issues and agendas to pursue what our own egos dictate of us.

    I'd rather focus on the positive, I have lived in many countries, have friends who have become family and follow different religions.. and there is soo much love, compassion and generosity of spirit there... that I cannot imagine my life without them. How can we continue to propagate this egotistical diatribe... beats me!

    Btw the US is a nation of immigrants.. and if you still continue to push hatred against others in your heart.. that is a bad choice you are making.

    May 3, 2012 at 4:27 pm |
  3. QuietPatriot

    There is nothing that CNN likes more than a self impressed athiest smart aleck stirring up anti-christian blog prattle.

    No one says you have to be a Christian, the religion is founded on the principal that you choose to be one, and if you don't so choose, not my issue.

    People like Steve are confused about the difference between Christianity and Christian organizations. The former is the religion, the latter are people trying to put their stamp on religion. To be a Christian you don't need an organization, or a church, or anyone else's approval. The National Day of Prayer is about the individual, and their personal relationship with a greater power that plays a central role in their life. If you don't care to pray, don't, but why purposely denigrate those that do? Steve, why don't you go give people a hard time about planting trees on Arbor Day?

    May 3, 2012 at 4:27 pm |
    • Brian

      Thank you! Please explain this to the author of this article and to the CNN doooshh bag crew.

      May 3, 2012 at 4:28 pm |
    • Alverant

      "No one says you have to be a Christian"
      A lot of christians do like HW Bush.
      "the religion is founded on the principal that you choose to be one, and if you don't so choose"
      And if you choose not to you're punished. That's a mugger's choice: "You can choose to give me your wallet or you can choose to get shot by this gun I'm holding"

      May 3, 2012 at 4:35 pm |
  4. CJ

    Well, Steve. I am sure that voice in your head you think is god will get back to you. And it will pretty much agree with what you already believe and tell you that you are wise in such matters and that 'if only others understood Me like you do..etc, etc'. Rest assured, all the other believers, many of whom will disagree with you, will think the same thing. Which is exactly what you expect for a god that is entirely man made and for which there exists no more evidence than that of alien abduction or magic unicorns. And for whom the literature we are told to revere as sacred and revealing of god's plan on earth was written by people who did not understand a simple bladder infection amongst many other things. The bronze age is very much alive and well within the prayers of the faithful.

    May 3, 2012 at 4:26 pm |
  5. jbmar1312

    As a religion Christianity is the majority in this country. Therefore it stands to reason that those religious beliefs will impact society, and rightly so. As a faith, there are fewer Christians. You may ask, what is the difference? Glad you asked. Would you believe a doctor is sincere about being a doctor when they have no practice, patients or hardly go to their office? Can one really be a Christian with no evidence? First and foremost is believing what the Bible says about God. There is barely any debate amoung religious or secular scholars that the Bible is the greatest literary work that has ever been written. Yet, even those who call themselves Christians do not take the time to read it. Can I really call my self a Boy Scout if I do not go through the program and try to make the 12 points of the scout law part of my life? Hardly. I realize for some this seems like an empty argument and for others self rightous judging. I do mean to judge, we should judge (evaluate) intentions, actions, behaviors, etc. I read the Bible, attend church regularly, to love others more than myself and pray. Do I mess it up? All of the time. But I am trying to change by doing everything I can to allow change to take place in me. To be Christ like, after all that is what the meaning of Christian is, to be Christ like.

    May 3, 2012 at 4:26 pm |
    • SouthernCelt

      If you go to Church perhaps you have heard "Judge not lest ye be judged". Since we are all sinners I'd be careful with that.

      May 3, 2012 at 4:41 pm |
    • 60's man

      You do not need to have a God or the threat of eternal punishment to do the right thing in this life. All would be chaos if we didn't. I will not deny anyone their faith or belief in a supreme being as long as you do not try to force that belief on me or others who find it folly.

      May 3, 2012 at 4:46 pm |
    • BlueJay

      I'm feelin that 60's.....kinda hard to not appreciate the angle from which we see things.....in the equation

      May 3, 2012 at 8:40 pm |
  6. billy

    National get back to work day! Sorry, boss, I was just worshipping (trolling the CNN boards)! First ammendment biaatches

    May 3, 2012 at 4:26 pm |
  7. Shawn

    I find it interesting that Atheists come here to fight with Christians... Why are you so concerned with convincing us to believe in NOTHING? Why come here to fight, argue, insight anger and hatred? If you don't believe in anything so be it, go away and take your verbal attacks with you. Stay away from us we don't want to discuss anything with you. You believe in what you believe in (nothing) and we believe in God. There is no more to the story. Unless maybe... just maybe... you do believe in something but will not admit it. Maybe you actually hate God with all your heart and enjoy spewing your evil poison onto his people?

    May 3, 2012 at 4:26 pm |
    • Wayne

      Shawn we believe in everything you do except God.

      May 3, 2012 at 4:30 pm |
    • Alverant

      First Shawn, if christians weren't obsessed with converting us, lying about us, and taking away our rights we wouldn't have to fight you. You don't see many Atheits argueing with buddhists do you? But then you don't see many buddhists insisting on special rights.

      Second, Atheists hate god the same way we hate Darth Vader. Both are fictional characters who commited acts of evil. What christians can't seem to understand is that a god who slaughters people (as he frequently did in the OT) is not worthy of worship even if he did exist.

      May 3, 2012 at 4:39 pm |
  8. TCS

    this author is a choad

    May 3, 2012 at 4:26 pm |
  9. einnor76

    Some pray, some meditate, some reflect....what is the difference....jeez

    May 3, 2012 at 4:25 pm |
  10. Jeff

    So much on here has been said so many times. What's the point? You're not going to change opinions or beliefs (or lack thereof) on a blog. That said, it's really silly of me to even comment, but I feel compelled to do so anyways.

    Do any of you take any time to really read, or are you just preparing your next blast to throw on here about an imaginary sky person or the archaic beliefs set forth years ago by man?

    For those of you not already responding to me in some snide way, I have two things...first, thank you. Second, what I hear so much from these posts that are critical of God is that they really aren't criticizing God in any way, shape, or form. The criticism is on those who do things "In the name of God." Your criticism is of man, not God. Guess what? I stand right there with you and would be the first in line to put those "Christians" in their place. They say/do things not according to God, but by their own misguided thoughts and feelings on a myriad of topics. Why do (some of) you choose to lump us all together and say we're dumb? What's the point?

    I'm happy to discuss any religious issue on here from the validity to the bible to the factual accounts of Christ. Are you? Or do you want to name call? I'm not interested in converting anyone...that's between you and God. I'll talk to you and explain to you why I believe what I do, but in the end it's on you to decide for yourself. With that sentiment in mind, please don't slam me because I believe what I believe.

    May 3, 2012 at 4:25 pm |
    • Bruce

      My meta-meta-comment is better than your meta-comment, Jeff!

      May 3, 2012 at 4:28 pm |
    • Jeff

      @Bruce...lol...it is what it is, right?

      May 3, 2012 at 4:32 pm |
    • HawaiiGuest

      @Jeff

      I have never seen any sort of evidence for the validity of the bible, or to think that Jesus was any more than a traveling preacher who had some radical thoughts for his time. Just wondering if you have anything new in support of these things.

      May 3, 2012 at 4:35 pm |
    • SouthernCelt

      @HawaiiGuest,
      Read Lives of the Saints, visit Lourdes, France, or investigate any of the factual events that have happened throughout the centuries that Science can't explain. Education broadens the mind, even all the closed ones here.

      May 3, 2012 at 4:46 pm |
    • Jeff

      @HawaiiGuest...it's a bit long, but if you'll allow me:

      Renowned Bible scholar F.F. Bruce declares:

      There is no body of ancient literature in the world which enjoys such a wealth of good textual attestation as the New Testament. 7

      Homer's Iliad, the most renowned book of ancient Greece, is the second best-preserved literary work of all antiquity, with 643 copies of manuscript support discovered to date. In those copies, there are 764 disputed lines of text, as compared to 40 lines in all the New Testament manuscripts. 8 In fact, many people are unaware that there are no surviving manuscripts of any of William Shakespeare's 37 plays (written in the 1600's), and scholars have been forced to fill some gaps in his works. 9 This pales in textual comparison with the over 5,600 copies and fragments of the New Testament in the original Greek that, together, assure us that nothing's been lost. In fact, all of the New Testament except eleven minor verses can be reconstructed outside the Bible from the writings of the early church leaders in the second and third centuries AD.

      The academic discipline of "textual criticism" assures us that the Bible translations we have today are essentially the same as the ancient Bible manuscripts, with the exception of a few inconsequential discrepancies that have been introduced over time through copyist error. We must remember that the Bible was hand-copied for hundreds of years before the invention of the first printing press. Nevertheless, the text is exceedingly well preserved. Again, I pondered this - of the approximately 20,000 lines that make up the entire New Testament, only 40 lines are in question. These 40 lines represent one quarter of one percent of the entire text and do not in any way affect the teaching and doctrine of the New Testament. I again compared this with Homer's Iliad. Of the approximately 15,600 lines that make up Homer's classic, 764 lines are in question. These 764 lines represent over 5% of the entire text, and yet nobody seems to question the general integrity of that ancient work.

      May 3, 2012 at 4:48 pm |
    • HawaiiGuest

      @SouthernCelt

      What factual events are you talking about? Specific examples instead of generalized statements would work better for your case. As for the Lives of Saints, what would that book prove, laced as it is with loaded language like St. Justin being bron of "heathen" parents?

      May 3, 2012 at 4:52 pm |
    • HawaiiGuest

      @Jeff

      For one, biblical scholars accepting that the bible is true shows nothing. It's not even known who actually wrote the gospel of Matthew even. Papias (christian bishop of about 100-140 AD) wrote that matthew gathered the writings which were in Hebrew and translated them into greek, yet the oldest manuscript in greek of that gospel shows none of the telltale signs of translation. Second, no one cares about the accuracy of the Illiad is because no one has built a religion around it, and is attempting to legislate based on it. It's a good story with some factual events and some legends, that's it. Which are factual and which aren't are merely a matter of curiosity.

      May 3, 2012 at 5:10 pm |
    • SouthernCelt

      @HawaiiGuest,
      It takes at least two miracles (which defy scientific explanation) to be declared a Saint. I's a pretty thick book and I guarantee you won't suffer any ill effects by entering a Catholic Book Store to get it. Lourdes, France is the same sort of story, miraculous healing of terminal patients that Medical Science cannot explain. How about this for a miracle, 2000 years in operation and The Church is still here and believes/teaches the same things. You've seen the worst, how about investigating the best we've done?

      May 3, 2012 at 5:11 pm |
    • HawaiiGuest

      @SouthernCelt

      Teaches the same thing? Don't make me laugh. The early Christians thought that the entire bible OT and NT was meant to be followed to the letter. I don't see christian churches teaching people to stone anyone anymore, just to legislate against them (stomping on the first ammendment in the process) in hopes that they can ignore the reality of others not agreeing with everything they say, or not behaving in what they view as the right way. The time a belief system is around is no indication of it's truth or validity. By your criteria, the Jews would be more right than you are, since their beliefs have been around longer than christianity.

      May 3, 2012 at 5:21 pm |
    • Jeff

      @HawaiiGuest...I was only pointing out the Iliad as it is a comparable manuscript. Both have been preserved over time...I feel as though the method for preserving one should be good for preserving the other.

      The fact that it is from a bible scholar is inconsequential.

      May 3, 2012 at 5:22 pm |
    • HawaiiGuest

      @SouthernCelt

      As for lourdes france, I find it hilarious that people attribute all the "miracles" to the water, when Saint Bernadette herself said the waters had no healing properties, and that it was faith. Even though science cannot explain something, doesn't mean your right and that your specific god exists, it just means that science can't explain it. A "god of the gaps" fallacy doesn't fly when science falls short at the time.

      May 3, 2012 at 5:26 pm |
    • HawaiiGuest

      @Jeff

      Quick google search brought up the authorship of the Pauline letters. Apparently only 7 of the 13 letters of paul are considered undisputed, and the other 6 (which im pretty sure add up to more than 40 lines) lack any type of academic consensus.

      May 3, 2012 at 5:47 pm |
    • Jeff

      @HawaiiGuest...maybe...I'm sure we could both go back and forth, but that's really an exercise in futility. I was merely pointing out that the bible...by measurable standards...should be considered reliable text. To the number of lines, maybe it is more than 40...I've never done the work to figure that out. Never did the work on the Iliad either though. Still though, if 1000 lines of the bible were in dispute, that's still less than 5%...just sayin'. Bottom line, even if we both had the time to do our own work, there would still likely be a dispute!

      It is what it is. I base my life on the bible as I truly believe it is the inspired Word of God. That doesn't give me any kind of all access pass to be intolerant though. I totally get that people view Christians in a negative light and I totally understand why they do. All I'm saying is don't let that be your final answer on God. Do your own work and try and tune out the loud minority. They DO NOT speak for all of us.

      In the end, your decision comes down to you and God. Whatever your choice (and I certainly hope it's for God!), peace to you and yours...

      May 3, 2012 at 6:17 pm |
  11. Erik Jensen

    Prayer, pfffft. Try actually doing something instead.

    May 3, 2012 at 4:25 pm |
    • SouthernCelt

      Same old argument, Faith or Works. Try something new. How about if you have the Faith you will naturally do Good Works?
      They aren't mutually exclusive.

      May 3, 2012 at 5:13 pm |
  12. Bruce

    National Day of Prayer = Rending unto Caesar that which is God's

    May 3, 2012 at 4:25 pm |
  13. Chut Pata

    Well if it weren't for religion, we would not have gone into George Bush's "Neo-Crusades", and screw the country financially and PR wise. Thank you religion, for continuing to screw us.

    May 3, 2012 at 4:25 pm |
  14. Mike

    The author is a jerk. He shold mock out our President who is a fake spiritualist instead of religions. Or mock out Islam as praying for our demise on National Prayer Day. Jerk.

    May 3, 2012 at 4:24 pm |
    • Brian

      Ya and the funny thing is, all these athiests are scarred to say anything in person because they are all cowards. If i saw this author in person i would smash his face and make him become a christian. CNN, stop bashing our religion again, you did that yesterday and the day before.

      May 3, 2012 at 4:27 pm |
    • HawaiiGuest

      @Brian

      Come over here, and I'll tell you exactly what I think of your religion. I'm an open atheist, and proud of it. Your immorality is showing when you say things like "i would smash his face and make him become a christian.". You would've done well during the crusades and the witch hunts.

      May 3, 2012 at 4:29 pm |
    • HawaiiGuest

      Nothing more to say Brian? Did you fingers type before your brain realized what you were putting down? Guess we know who the coward really is.

      May 3, 2012 at 5:52 pm |
  15. Vance

    the great thing about being an Atheist is that it does not matter. If people want to pray, fine by me. I don't understand why some of my fellow Atheist are so rude when it comes to religion. Sure, we have our opinions on what religion means around the world. Some good some bad. Personally, I don't blame religion for anything. I blame people. Hell, you could interpret the wind as an all powerful voice and you could get a bunch of people to follow as if it were some sort of religion. Religion does not kill, maim, or hurt people. PEOPLE do all of the above. Let's be honest, for a great many religion is a great road map to being a good person. It's not a road map I require. I don;t need the threat of hell, or promise of eternal life to be a good and honorable person. But if you do, it's fine by me. Just don;t judge me for not believing what you believe in and I will do the same. Happy Prayer day to all.

    May 3, 2012 at 4:24 pm |
    • mema

      Vance...finally a thoughful and conciderate atheist. You my friend are a breath of fresh air. I do not mind that some do not believe in nor pray to GOD. I can respect that position! It does though astound me as how many atheist come on the belief blog to belittle and put down their fellow nighbor, friends, aquaintences so forth who have wrong them only by having faith in GOD. I just want wanted to take a moment to thank you for your post. So Thanks!

      May 3, 2012 at 6:11 pm |
  16. BlueJay

    How do you pray in a religiously diversified nation?.......Be the best of what you are and do those things which make our future as a nation a better place instead of hopin an exostential force will step in and make the entire world right as rain............

    May 3, 2012 at 4:24 pm |
    • BlueJay

      Thats where its at....in the end its all according to what you beleve in.....regardless, being religiously diverse you can pretty mush guarantee the bases are covered....woot!

      May 3, 2012 at 4:26 pm |
    • BlueJay

      Just gotta make the personal decision to get off yer ace instead of cryin about everyone else's ace

      May 3, 2012 at 4:27 pm |
    • BlueJay

      within that....we...(the world ) will determine whether or not you have anything of value to say.....it aint like its as difficult as differential calculus....(knowudI mean)

      May 3, 2012 at 4:29 pm |
    • BlueJay

      Argue with that .....ladybugs

      May 3, 2012 at 4:31 pm |
    • SouthernCelt

      @BlueJay,
      In addition to Differential Calculus I took a lot of English so I could learn how to spell correctly. Why don't you do the same?

      May 3, 2012 at 4:50 pm |
  17. MeMelvin

    There will never be scientific or physical proof of God. Anything humans can imagine may or may not be "God".

    Most specifically, the moment humans anthropomorphize the unknown and unknowable, the less likely those adjectives or nouns are suitable. Some philosophers along the millenniums have call this "The Nothing" because while there may be physical evidence of "Its Energies", there is no knowledge of "Its Essence".

    We humans shall always be in doubt if what we demand is scientific or physical proof.

    May 3, 2012 at 4:24 pm |
    • Mike

      How could we go from nothing to something without a Force. A very logical (and scientific) explanation for me. Aquinas.

      May 3, 2012 at 4:27 pm |
    • SouthernCelt

      No physical proof? His Son walked the Earth for 30+ years, witnessed by thousands that saw him. Was He God's Son? He said so, Died, Resurrected, and Ascended to Heaven. All facts witnessed by more people than those that chronicled the battles of Julius Caesar, yet you don't believe in Him but believe in all the battles. Sounds like you believe in the wrong things or nothing.

      May 3, 2012 at 4:56 pm |
    • BlueJay

      Its hard to argue against ALL 5000 years of recorded history it is.....cuz history after all....is only 5000 years old

      May 3, 2012 at 8:50 pm |
    • BlueJay

      Lots people got stuff to say,......very very few people actually live what they wanna live

      May 3, 2012 at 8:52 pm |
  18. Bob

    Religion and politics both call to the irrational ape within us. How wonderful it would be for even a tiny fraction of the populace to embrace logical thinking.

    May 3, 2012 at 4:24 pm |
    • indogwetrust

      Amen

      May 3, 2012 at 4:25 pm |
    • indogwetrust

      Amen brother

      May 3, 2012 at 4:27 pm |
  19. Suveda Thiagaraj

    For your personal reflection read from the Bible Acts 17:22-31 and also Romans 1.

    Everyone can worship their Creator ... the Lord of the Universe ... who Christians call God the Father ... so say the Lord's Prayer it was Jesus's answer when His disciples asked Him "How to pray?"... "Our Father who art in heaven" .... refer to Matt 6:9-18.

    May 3, 2012 at 4:24 pm |
    • tkessler45

      Unfortunately, your little story is full of holes. I was not created, and neither were you. You developed through natural causes. Your body did it by itself. If anything, blame your parents for having too much fun about 9 months before you were born.

      May 3, 2012 at 4:28 pm |
    • SouthernCelt

      @tkessler45,
      If you knew anything about Biochemistry alone you would realize that the birth of a healthy infant is a miracle. Open your mind. Read The Bible, particularly the New Testament and think about what you read and compare it to what you see in the World. If you wish to remain in the 4%, God Forgive you if it is Right that He should Do So.

      May 3, 2012 at 5:02 pm |
    • BlueJay

      Celt....you have pretty much made your presence known.....but I am beginning to wonder if your a thinker or just someone, responding off the cuff to what yer hearin.....inquiring minds want to know....which is it

      May 3, 2012 at 8:47 pm |
    • BlueJay

      I enjoy good information

      May 3, 2012 at 8:48 pm |
  20. indogwetrust

    National day of waisting time. NDWT

    May 3, 2012 at 4:23 pm |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.