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'Recovering Catholics' reveal spiritual journeys
According to a 2008 poll, 31% of Americans were raised Catholic, but only 24% describe themselves as Catholic.
June 19th, 2012
09:36 AM ET

'Recovering Catholics' reveal spiritual journeys

By Jim Spellman, CNN

Denver (CNN) - Kristen Kelly was raised Roman Catholic, attended Catholic elementary school and considered herself a good Catholic, but when she was 21-years-old that changed.

“A coworker asked me if I believe in Jesus Christ,” she says.

Despite spending her entire life in the Roman Catholic Church she couldn’t answer the question.

“I never really got exposed to Christ," she says. "It was more about Mary and the Church and a condemnation of everything I was doing wrong.”

She looked at her coworker and saw someone who appeared to have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ and decided that was what she wanted. She said this prayer:

“Jesus I accept that you are my lord and savior, and I ask you to come into my life.”

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And from that moment Kelly, now 41 and living in Florida, considered herself born-again, and an ex-Catholic.

“I like to call us recovering Catholics,” she says with a laugh.

According to a 2008 study by the Pew Forum on Religious Life and Public Life, 31% of Americans were raised Catholic, but only 24% now describe themselves as Catholic. Read the study (PDF).

That means about 1 in 10 Americans is an ex-Catholic. If they were a denomination they would be bigger than Methodists, Baptists, Lutherans and Presbyterians.

The total U.S. Catholic population has remained at about 24%, as immigrants have filled the pews the ex-Catholics have left behind.

Video: Why do some Catholic outsiders remain inside the flock?  

Kathleen Cummings , associate director at the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism at Notre Dame, says that some people leave the Catholic Church after a defining event like the priest abuse scandals or because of a disagreement with the Church over social issues, but most leave because they feel their needs are not being met.

“They are not experiencing something that fulfills them spiritually,” Cummings says.

Church supporters are urging wayward Catholics to return to the fold. For example, Catholics Come Home, a nonprofit lay organization formed in 1997, has been putting out the welcome mat via the media.

The group has an interactive website www.Catholicscomehome.org and airs what it calls “evangomercials” on radio and television. The group says that since 2008 more than 350,000 people have “come home” to the Catholic Church through their campaign.

Tom Peterson, president of Catholics Come Home, says some worshipers who've returned to the Catholic Church report leaving because they had disagreements with church officials or had divorced and feared they wouldn’t be welcome. But, he says, the majority never really gave up on the Church.

“They just drifted away and life got too busy," Peterson says. "Most say they didn’t dislike the Church, nor were they opposed to the Church teachings.

“An overwhelming majority of returnees tell our diocesan partners that they came home to the Catholic Church, 'because you invited me,'" he says.

But it may not be so simple to lure back ex-Catholics like Matt Rowe, a 35-year-old married father of two living in Denver. Rowe attended 16 years of Catholic School in Illinois and attended a Catholic university.

But by the end of college, Rowe was adrift. He found himself disagreeing with the Church on everything from the role of women to the concept of original sin and what he saw as the Catholic Church’s dependence on guilt as a motivating factor.

Rowe gave up on religion for most of his 20s but never stopped believing in God. When he got married and had kids, he started feeling a void in his life.

“I wanted my kids to grow up in a religion, but not Catholicism,” he says.

After “church-hopping” for a few years, Rowe ended up at Pathways Wash Park, a multidenominational Christian church in Denver.

After years of feeling disconnected in the Catholic Church where he says sermons rarely connected to his life, he has finally found the connection he has been looking for at Pathways.

“I wanted spirituality. I wanted God. I wanted all those points to go back to what I’m dealing with today,” Rowe says.

Fred Viarrial, 59, grew up as an altar boy at St. Leo’s in Denver. Six days a week he donned his cassock and worked the 6 a.m. Mass.

“Books or bells. You are ringing the bells or moving the books for the priests,” Viarrial says.

But as he grew up he began questioning elements of Catholicism. One day, when Viarrial was somewhere between age 10 and 12, he had something especially embarrassing to confess, so he trekked over to a Spanish language parish where he was unknown.

“The priest pulled me out and spanked me on the spot,” Viarrial says with a laugh. “That got me to question this whole thing of confession.”

When he was just 14 the precocious teenager went so far as to schedule an appointment with Denver ‘s then-Archbishop James Casey to discuss his doubts.

“I took a two-page list of questions starting with the Hail Mary. I wanted to find them in the Bible, their origin … where is that in the Bible?”

Viarrial says the archbishop humored him but ultimately did not answer his questions.

He still believed in God, but was losing faith in the Church.

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By his 20s he was searching for a new church and ended up at Arvada Covenant Church, an evangelical congregation in a Denver suburb.

At Arvada Covenant he says the focus is on a personal relationship with Jesus and that his questions about his faith and the Bible are not met with derision, but with a search for answers through Bible study.

He has found a home at Arvada Covenant, but says he holds no grudge against the Catholic Church and still feels echoes of his Catholic upbringing in his faith today.

“It’s like a spiritual tattoo that you receive as a kid," Viarrial says. "Those roots don’t ever disappear, you just better try to understand them.”

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Belief • Catholic Church • Christianity • Colorado • Faith

soundoff (2,511 Responses)
  1. fofo

    There is no difference between the Catholic Church and the Muslim brotherhood. They both feed people to gain for themselves. To H E L L with every organized religion.

    June 19, 2012 at 1:49 pm |
    • Huebert

      We shall only have disorganized religion from now on. All Catholics are now pope. have fun.

      June 19, 2012 at 1:52 pm |
    • Agapatos

      Perhaps you don't quite understand that the church is the bride of Christ, in other words, we have to make ourselves worthy of Christ (just as any person must make themself worthy of their spouse), and we do it by making ourselves holy, thru the church's sacraments, but the church is not an end in itself; Christ is the end.

      June 19, 2012 at 1:56 pm |
  2. Cathy Curland

    I was raised a Catholic, went to Catholic school and all the sacraments. It is a beautiful religion. However the current efforts by church hierarchy to insert themselves into our political system is disgusting to me. It is if they are returning to the middle ages. The crackdown on nuns, suppression of women's rights and inadequate way they have addressed the child molestation scandal in the church has really led me to question my faith and if this a church I want to be associated with. They need to lead by example, not legislation.

    June 19, 2012 at 1:48 pm |
    • trypax

      Amen! That's what I think, too!

      June 19, 2012 at 3:46 pm |
  3. Bob D Iowa

    You can support and/or believe in Christ without adhering to ANY Church Doctrine. All Religions have twisted the words that were written, re-written and translated hundreds of time to meet their needs and not those of God or Christ. The worsts are those that pound the down as hard as they can and tell you what to think, say and believe. Each and every person has the ability and right to do that for themselves and be a better person for it.

    June 19, 2012 at 1:48 pm |
    • Primewonk

      So, if all religions have twisted the words and meaning of your bible, how do you know what Jesus wants you to believe?

      June 19, 2012 at 2:11 pm |
  4. Re-convert

    I grew up going to a catholic grade school, high school, and college. I didn't get my first taste of non-Catholic education until graduate school. I understand what the people say about wondering why the Catholic Church does what it does. I went through a very confusing time and questioned the meaning of it all. HOWEVER, to be fair to the church (and ultimately to myself), I searched for the answers from CREDIBLE sources who knew the Catholic faith (as opposed to those who though they knew). With God's grace and the adventure of self-discovery, I had a major reconversion back to Catholicism–through that journey, my relationship to CHRIST has grown by leaps and bounds from where I was. I love the richness of my Catholic faith and the joy it brings to me and my family.

    BTW, disappointed that this articles was so one-sided; how about some anecdotes from those who reconverted.

    June 19, 2012 at 1:48 pm |
    • Delusions 3:15

      how about NO anecdotes, including yours ? How about some science ? With some actual science you could not possibly believe in a god.

      June 19, 2012 at 1:51 pm |
    • closet atheist

      how does one have a relationship with something that doesn't exist?

      I think it's cute, albeit mildly disturbing, when my 4 year old daughter has imaginary friends. but you're an adult, so what's up with that?

      June 19, 2012 at 1:53 pm |
    • Bill Deacon

      Congratulation Re-convert!

      Del – I think you are blogging on the wrong article.

      June 19, 2012 at 1:56 pm |
    • Mass Debater

      More like Re-constltuted...

      June 19, 2012 at 1:57 pm |
    • Re-convert

      Delusions 3:15

      how about NO anecdotes, including yours ? How about some science ? With some actual science you could not possibly believe in a god.

      funny...my graduate degree is in a pure science field and it has never caused any conflict between my Catholic faith and science. It has led me to a deeper AWE of God and His creation. The scientific method is a very effective method to tackling empircal problems, but falls way short in answering deep & meaningful questions like "What is the meaning of life", etc.

      God is not someone/something that can be directly measured or observed. C.S. Lewis used the analogy of an architect-the architect can not be directly observed; however, there is indirect evidence of his/her existence (i.e., the building).

      June 19, 2012 at 4:10 pm |
  5. Alan

    Okay, I was wondering what CNN would choose as their Catholic bashing story this week. Now I know. Maybe we'll get lucky and they will do a few more this week.

    June 19, 2012 at 1:48 pm |
    • LOL Religion

      The Christian persecution complex is hilarious, but Catholics take it to a whole new level.

      June 19, 2012 at 1:50 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      @LOL Religion,

      They have more experience with it than most – except of course, the Jews.

      At one time, it was illegal to celebrate Catholic observances in most of colonial North America. (Excepting of course, New France, New Mexico, La Florida, Maryland etc).

      June 19, 2012 at 2:00 pm |
    • LOL Religion

      @I'm not a gop'er

      Do you know what a persecution COMPLEX is?

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persecutory_delusion

      June 19, 2012 at 2:06 pm |
  6. Eastern Catholic

    The Church is more than Rome. There are 22 particular Churches in communion with each other and the Church of Rome. All sisters, all equals, all Catholic. I am a Catholic that is from one of the NINE Byzantine Rite Churches in full communion with Rome. My patriarch is here in the United States. Our parishes are not a mirror image of the Masses you see on EWTN. And yet, we are Catholic. Our beliefs compliment those of the Church of Rome but are not letter for letter Rome's.

    The examples I see in the article above are from those who were not properly catechized in their own Church. I do not see this as an unstemming tide that is rushing away from the shore. These are individuals making individual decisions based on their own beliefs whether they be accurate or not.

    As for those condemning the universal church, come see what a good parish looks like. Christ lives in the hearts of those parishioners as surely as it does our Orthodox brothers and sisters. Don't condemn what you don't know, don't understand and are not willing to learn more than a superficial sound byte about.

    June 19, 2012 at 1:47 pm |
    • Horus

      The typical atheist knows more, and has reflected far deeper about religion than "believers". Unlike religious conjecture, there is actually evidence of this.....

      June 19, 2012 at 1:51 pm |
  7. Mike in WI

    I was raised Catholic, and during my military service several years ago, I came to no longer believe in the Bible nor do I believe in 'blind faith' based on fear (organized religion).

    June 19, 2012 at 1:47 pm |
    • Adam

      Congratulations, Mike, and thank you for your service.

      June 19, 2012 at 1:54 pm |
  8. Libdumb

    How can you believe in something that doesn't exist. Let's talk about today not something that was written thousands of years ago. Relate to God's presence today. You know something good that he had his hand in. The fish story is getting stale.

    June 19, 2012 at 1:47 pm |
    • Bill Deacon

      You don't like things that were written long ago? Like Archimide's Principle, the Pythagoean therom, the Socratic method? I guess we should throw those out, too old

      June 19, 2012 at 2:01 pm |
    • Libdumb

      Bill Deacon. You are relating to something definitive vs abstract. If God is all present why don't we see his works today? I don't want to continually hear about the parting of the sea. Funny how they find a miracle performed by a soon to be Saint but that Saint doesn't have a clue, while they were alive, that they performed a miracle.

      June 19, 2012 at 2:27 pm |
  9. Partyman JG

    They say that Jesus can turn water into wine. So what? I can turn wine into......LUNCH!

    June 19, 2012 at 1:46 pm |
  10. Adam

    If you ACTUALLY believe in Transubstantiation, you are INSANE. This is manifestly obvious.

    June 19, 2012 at 1:46 pm |
    • LOL Religion

      Indeed. An insane cannibal if fact.

      June 19, 2012 at 1:52 pm |
    • Bill Deacon

      If you don't understand transubstantiation you might think so. But you'd be wrong

      June 19, 2012 at 2:03 pm |
    • Adam

      Christ is "really, truly, and substantially present" in the Eucharist. It seems that you are in favor of a more nuanced view. What that tells me is that you, presumably a Catholic, don't ACTUALLY believe what you SAY you believe. That you've admitted (at least subconsciously, to yourself) that this specific doctrine is BS, and have employed an exegesis of convenience in order to weasel your way around such manifest absurdity because you are quite attached to calling yourself a Catholic.

      Now then: share with me your "understanding."

      June 19, 2012 at 2:21 pm |
  11. Recovering Republican

    My tag is Recovering Republican, but first, I was a recovering Catholic. Being Italian, my mother just knew I was going to burn in hell for leaving the Catholic faith, just like every Evangelical knows that everyone outside of their congregation will burn. Life is better now, I have a relationship with Jesus, and God, and it's good living without all the judgement.
    I am not afraid of God's loving and righteous judgement. Unlike the retarded Catholic and hate filled Evangelicals, God is qualified for the job of judging, and He shows real Mercy, not the watered down brand shown when the offering plate comes around. If you want to get to know God, meet Him personnally. It really is magnificent. But avoid Christians who hate, cause the God they introduce you to is Money, Racism, and Sarah Palin.

    June 19, 2012 at 1:46 pm |
    • jim

      Mercy? Like when he killed everyone with a flood? Or when he decided all living things need to kill something else for nourishment?

      June 19, 2012 at 1:51 pm |
    • jbcal

      "Retarded catholics, hate filled evangicals." That sounds pretty hateful and judgemental.

      June 19, 2012 at 1:54 pm |
  12. Chris

    Not surprised at CNN putting this in. For a national news station you sure have a bias against this church. I lwould ike to see you show you aren't so biased and provide either equal time to showing a positive story about the Catholic Church or show the statistics or stories on other faiths which are suffering equally or more in lack of attendance and in people leaving the church. You know it's true..how come you don't print or cover that? Be honest CNN!

    June 19, 2012 at 1:46 pm |
    • Horus

      They have posted such articles on "other" religions. They also have "positive" articles. Perhaps you should look through the entire blog before posting...

      June 19, 2012 at 1:48 pm |
  13. TerreG

    I grew up Catholic and attended Catholic schools. I consider myself Catholic and although I disagree with many of the Church teachings that are based on dogma, like birth control, etc., Maybe it is the way I was taught what being a Catholic means but I would not nor have I ever considered changing religions. And by the way, I am not a consistent attendee at mass on Sundays.

    June 19, 2012 at 1:45 pm |
    • TerreG

      That should be "not based on dogma".

      June 19, 2012 at 1:46 pm |
    • Huebert

      I'm curious, if you don't agree with your church's teachings why are you still a member?

      June 19, 2012 at 1:47 pm |
    • Eastern Catholic

      Birth control is not dogma. It is a discussion based in dogma reliant and pursuant to doctrine.

      June 19, 2012 at 1:55 pm |
    • Bill Deacon

      You perpetuate the misinformation so many use to disparage the Faith. Either go back to mass and learn your catechism or stop calling yourself Catholic.

      June 19, 2012 at 2:06 pm |
  14. carlyjanew6

    http://www.Hear-The-Truth.com

    June 19, 2012 at 1:44 pm |
    • MK

      http://www.ThinkForYourself.com

      June 19, 2012 at 1:49 pm |
  15. Jackson

    Maybe if the church stopped trying to get involved in politics, stopped ignoring the abuse scandals, and, oh, I don't know, maybe use all that money to actually clothe, feed and shelter the poor, and get back to doing the job they are ***supposed*** to be doing, maybe people wouldn't be leaving the church.

    People feel like the church isn't doing anything for them because it isn't! It's too busy being selfish to do its real job.

    June 19, 2012 at 1:44 pm |
    • trevor

      And your comment just highlights the problem with alot of "luke warm" or "baby" Christians...what is the "church" actually supposed to "do" for them? Christ said is that "WE are his hands, WE are his feet and WE are his voice...we're supposed to serve and not be served. The "church" is what WE make it, WE are the "Body of Christ" not exclusively relegated to the leaders of any particular group (Catholic, Protestant etc...).

      I'm not saying every person that "leaves" the Church because their not being "fullfilled" spiritually is the same, but I'm willing to bet that in most cases almost ZERO effort was put forth on their part to try to change what they felt was wrong...they expected to be "fed" and when they weren't getting "fed" EXACTLY the way they wanted the "gave up" on one of Christ's PRIMARY directives...to be the "church" (ie: his body)...and giving up just because it wasn't "perfect" just shows their level of commitment to Christ's will.

      June 19, 2012 at 2:03 pm |
    • rebelcatholic

      Strange choice of words "retarded Catholic" and an even stranger reference to what the church isn't doing....She feeds the poor, gives them healthcare, clothes them, provides for their basic human needs of dignity...but above all else, she gave us Christianity...and a code of ethics. You sir, have probably fallen into the trap of believing what is printed in the media, and not what is in the heart...and I can't leave without asking- what have YOU done for your fellow man? I'll pray for you,,,and I hope God Almighty opens your blind eyes....BTW it is never ok to call and label anyone's church by offensive words like "retarded".

      June 19, 2012 at 2:22 pm |
  16. dav

    Pew Forum on Religious Life and Public Life, this sounds like a worthless athiest group.These pollsters are a bunch of frauds .

    June 19, 2012 at 1:44 pm |
    • Horus

      Deep research on that one, eh?

      June 19, 2012 at 1:46 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      The Pew Research Center is focused on assertaining fact versus opinion.

      Unlike many research organizations, they do not make policy recommendations.

      June 19, 2012 at 1:51 pm |
  17. JC

    Most Catholics are not aware of the true history of their church, or their faith. They are Catholics for the same reason that people are Democrats or Republicans; because mom and dad were. The truth is, if the average Catholic had any idea what their church has been up to for the last 2000 years, they would run, not walk, away from it. How did the church settle on the "holy trinity?" What happened to all the old world knowledge and learning as the church took over? Who was really responsible for the Dark Ages? What did something on the order of 16 crusades really accomplish? Who were the Dominicans, and what happened to the people in Spain and everywhere else they went? What about the other crusades in Latvia, Lithuania, and even Russia? How much land was contained in the "Papal States?" Why did Italy have so much trouble unifying? Just how long has the church's preoccupation with young boys been going on? The Catholic church was, is, and always will be one of the greatest sources of evil the world has ever seen. How do I know? I was raised Catholic, but I took the initiative to read a little history, and then I started thinking for myself.

    As for you 'Christians' that feel the need to shout your faith as the top of your lungs: are you trying to convince other people, or are you trying to convince yourself?

    June 19, 2012 at 1:43 pm |
    • dav

      you sound like the typical athiest fool.I supose if you got hungry you would eat you children since hey are just upright monkeys.

      June 19, 2012 at 1:46 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      RE: What did something on the order of 16 crusades really accomplish? Who were the Dominicans, and what happened to the people in Spain and everywhere else they went?

      Well, I would say that thanks to the Spanish reconquista (one of your 16 crusades) and subsequent Spanish imperialism, the Catholic church survives as a major religion. There is a direct connection between the reconquista and the fact that Catholicism in the US maintains it's 23% rate due to Latino immigration.

      It's not like this is a big secret. It's even mentioned (indirectly) in the article.

      June 19, 2012 at 1:55 pm |
    • JC

      As to the first: calling a man a fool does not dismiss the argument. As to atheism, you are incorrect. I believe in God. I do not believe in the Catholic Church.

      Also, the "Reconquista" isn't really part of the crusades; taking centuries to complete, the Reconquista was ongoing at a period of time when the rest of Europe had its own issues occurring with disease and barbarians of one sort or another. The Spanish completed the reconquest of the Iberian Peninsula largely on their own; which really doesn't fit the definition of a crusade, and left them with some very curious religious practices. The Spanish did well transporting their religion to the new world. With a whole generation of out of work military men, they tended to convert by the sword, simply killing anyone who would not convert. First the Conquistadors, then the priests. It is interesting that with all that faith, and all that time, Latin America remains as corrupt as it was before the Spanish stumbled into it.

      June 19, 2012 at 2:12 pm |
    • trevor

      I guess you feel OK that you let men within a particular organized group "dictate" your relationship with God/Christ...are you supposed to have a relationship with Christ or a priest? You really need to look back and take a long hard look at if you were really "all in" as a follower of Christ...thats all a Christian really is, just to believe in what he did for you and that his sacrifice and grace was sufficient not to be condemned by God. If you were really "all in" you would not have let what other men do/say may you "walk away" from God.

      BTW, yes some Christians feel it necessary to put in more "effort", and does their technique make people uncomfortable ABSOLUTELY. They just very well may be trying to convince themselves, because instead of approaching by asking they feel it necessary to approach by dictating. Most just approach others (co-worker, neighbor) that they recognize as "willing" to listen and invite them to join them to see what Christ is all about.

      June 19, 2012 at 2:18 pm |
    • trevor

      Understood, you believe in God...do you believe in Christ, the he is the son of God and what he did for you?

      June 19, 2012 at 2:26 pm |
  18. glades2

    My brother is goingi nto emergency kidney surgery in the next hour – at times like this, though scared, I'm glad for my relationship with Jesus Christ...

    June 19, 2012 at 1:43 pm |
    • glades2

      ...and being Catholic, and after attending Mass this morning asked our priest for his prayers for my brother...

      June 19, 2012 at 1:45 pm |
    • jim

      I hope for you the doctor relies on science instead of faith.

      June 19, 2012 at 1:47 pm |
    • Eastern Catholic

      Many prayers for peace, health and visitation during your brother's confinement to the hospital. You and your family are also in our prayers.

      June 19, 2012 at 1:49 pm |
    • glades2

      No, he needs to first pray for wisdom because God ALWAYS has the right answer, while intellect can only go so far and is prone to the human mind's errors – they beleive removing one kidney is the answer, but my brother's urologist is hoping they will not, but it's emergency surgery and they are going to do their best...

      June 19, 2012 at 1:50 pm |
    • glades2

      Eastern Catholic – thanks for your prayers – as God knows, they are needed for certain...

      June 19, 2012 at 1:51 pm |
    • NOT MY CHAIR

      why go to the hospital at all if you have such a great relationship with god?

      June 19, 2012 at 1:55 pm |
    • Mark

      Jim, you need both.

      June 19, 2012 at 2:13 pm |
    • HeavenSent

      If your brother is Catholic then he is going to hell along with you.

      Amen.

      June 19, 2012 at 2:24 pm |
    • HeavenSent

      Your brother doesn't need surgery from men, he needs Jesus. Jesus will heal him...you do believe that right???

      Amen.

      June 19, 2012 at 2:25 pm |
  19. David Walter

    In the effort to provide unbias journalism, the author should have listed the percentage of non-catholics that have fled their own faith. Is it higher or lower than those that leave the catholic churc? He throws out numbers that mean nothing because it probably destroys the point of his article. The author is trying to say lots of catholics leave the church but gives no really concrete facts to support it. I guarantee the numbers are greater for other christian denominations but that's not discussed. Just like the media did with the catholic priest child abuse scandals. Abuse occurs more often in other denominations but that was never mentioned. The media will do anything to put a bad light on the church.

    June 19, 2012 at 1:43 pm |
    • longtooth

      And your sources are.....?

      June 19, 2012 at 1:53 pm |
  20. bryan

    "Not 100 in the United States hate the Roman Catholic Church, but millions hate what they mistakenly think the Roman Catholic Church is." -Bishop Fulton J. Sheen

    June 19, 2012 at 1:43 pm |
    • Eastern Catholic

      Agreed to wholeheartedly.

      June 19, 2012 at 1:48 pm |
    • Emily

      One of my favorite quotes!
      🙂

      June 19, 2012 at 1:51 pm |
    • JC

      The basis for all religions everywhere and at every time is control. Control of thought, control of action, control of self. It is the opiate for the masses, and the Roman Catholic church has been one of the biggest dealers for far too long. Every little crack, every little leak, every little scandal reveals the church for what it is; what it is has always been. All Bishops know this, and all who make Cardinal actively use this knowledge for their own ends. The Roman Catholic Church is nothing more or less than the canker in the heart of the rose.

      June 19, 2012 at 1:55 pm |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.