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'Recovering Catholics' reveal spiritual journeys
According to a 2008 poll, 31% of Americans were raised Catholic, but only 24% describe themselves as Catholic.
June 19th, 2012
09:36 AM ET

'Recovering Catholics' reveal spiritual journeys

By Jim Spellman, CNN

Denver (CNN) - Kristen Kelly was raised Roman Catholic, attended Catholic elementary school and considered herself a good Catholic, but when she was 21-years-old that changed.

“A coworker asked me if I believe in Jesus Christ,” she says.

Despite spending her entire life in the Roman Catholic Church she couldn’t answer the question.

“I never really got exposed to Christ," she says. "It was more about Mary and the Church and a condemnation of everything I was doing wrong.”

She looked at her coworker and saw someone who appeared to have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ and decided that was what she wanted. She said this prayer:

“Jesus I accept that you are my lord and savior, and I ask you to come into my life.”

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And from that moment Kelly, now 41 and living in Florida, considered herself born-again, and an ex-Catholic.

“I like to call us recovering Catholics,” she says with a laugh.

According to a 2008 study by the Pew Forum on Religious Life and Public Life, 31% of Americans were raised Catholic, but only 24% now describe themselves as Catholic. Read the study (PDF).

That means about 1 in 10 Americans is an ex-Catholic. If they were a denomination they would be bigger than Methodists, Baptists, Lutherans and Presbyterians.

The total U.S. Catholic population has remained at about 24%, as immigrants have filled the pews the ex-Catholics have left behind.

Video: Why do some Catholic outsiders remain inside the flock?  

Kathleen Cummings , associate director at the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism at Notre Dame, says that some people leave the Catholic Church after a defining event like the priest abuse scandals or because of a disagreement with the Church over social issues, but most leave because they feel their needs are not being met.

“They are not experiencing something that fulfills them spiritually,” Cummings says.

Church supporters are urging wayward Catholics to return to the fold. For example, Catholics Come Home, a nonprofit lay organization formed in 1997, has been putting out the welcome mat via the media.

The group has an interactive website www.Catholicscomehome.org and airs what it calls “evangomercials” on radio and television. The group says that since 2008 more than 350,000 people have “come home” to the Catholic Church through their campaign.

Tom Peterson, president of Catholics Come Home, says some worshipers who've returned to the Catholic Church report leaving because they had disagreements with church officials or had divorced and feared they wouldn’t be welcome. But, he says, the majority never really gave up on the Church.

“They just drifted away and life got too busy," Peterson says. "Most say they didn’t dislike the Church, nor were they opposed to the Church teachings.

“An overwhelming majority of returnees tell our diocesan partners that they came home to the Catholic Church, 'because you invited me,'" he says.

But it may not be so simple to lure back ex-Catholics like Matt Rowe, a 35-year-old married father of two living in Denver. Rowe attended 16 years of Catholic School in Illinois and attended a Catholic university.

But by the end of college, Rowe was adrift. He found himself disagreeing with the Church on everything from the role of women to the concept of original sin and what he saw as the Catholic Church’s dependence on guilt as a motivating factor.

Rowe gave up on religion for most of his 20s but never stopped believing in God. When he got married and had kids, he started feeling a void in his life.

“I wanted my kids to grow up in a religion, but not Catholicism,” he says.

After “church-hopping” for a few years, Rowe ended up at Pathways Wash Park, a multidenominational Christian church in Denver.

After years of feeling disconnected in the Catholic Church where he says sermons rarely connected to his life, he has finally found the connection he has been looking for at Pathways.

“I wanted spirituality. I wanted God. I wanted all those points to go back to what I’m dealing with today,” Rowe says.

Fred Viarrial, 59, grew up as an altar boy at St. Leo’s in Denver. Six days a week he donned his cassock and worked the 6 a.m. Mass.

“Books or bells. You are ringing the bells or moving the books for the priests,” Viarrial says.

But as he grew up he began questioning elements of Catholicism. One day, when Viarrial was somewhere between age 10 and 12, he had something especially embarrassing to confess, so he trekked over to a Spanish language parish where he was unknown.

“The priest pulled me out and spanked me on the spot,” Viarrial says with a laugh. “That got me to question this whole thing of confession.”

When he was just 14 the precocious teenager went so far as to schedule an appointment with Denver ‘s then-Archbishop James Casey to discuss his doubts.

“I took a two-page list of questions starting with the Hail Mary. I wanted to find them in the Bible, their origin … where is that in the Bible?”

Viarrial says the archbishop humored him but ultimately did not answer his questions.

He still believed in God, but was losing faith in the Church.

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By his 20s he was searching for a new church and ended up at Arvada Covenant Church, an evangelical congregation in a Denver suburb.

At Arvada Covenant he says the focus is on a personal relationship with Jesus and that his questions about his faith and the Bible are not met with derision, but with a search for answers through Bible study.

He has found a home at Arvada Covenant, but says he holds no grudge against the Catholic Church and still feels echoes of his Catholic upbringing in his faith today.

“It’s like a spiritual tattoo that you receive as a kid," Viarrial says. "Those roots don’t ever disappear, you just better try to understand them.”

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Belief • Catholic Church • Christianity • Colorado • Faith

soundoff (2,511 Responses)
  1. AverageJoe76

    Why does nobody ever believe a killer when they say, "God told me to do it". Yet, Abraham was about to be a cold-blooded killer just to prove his faith to God (horribly wicked test, btw). Can the faithful see where I'm going with this? So what's the difference between Abraham of the Bible, and some nut off the street?

    June 19, 2012 at 4:06 pm |
    • Not All Docs Play Golf

      Yeah, and saying that your plastic dashboard Jesus spoke to you probably won't hold up in court as an aliby (except perhaps for a trial of a priest in a Vatican court).

      June 19, 2012 at 4:10 pm |
    • Bill Deacon

      The difference is that Abraham heard God tell him to stay his hand

      June 19, 2012 at 4:11 pm |
    • Madtown

      Bill Deacon
      The difference is that Abraham heard God tell him to stay his hand
      ----
      Oh? You say that as if it's an established fact. Interesting.

      June 19, 2012 at 4:14 pm |
  2. Chuck Finley

    Hey, as I've always said, there's no better way to breed atheists than to send your kids to Catholic school. Worked like a charm for me.

    June 19, 2012 at 4:06 pm |
    • Not All Docs Play Golf

      Hee Hee, I LOVE it!

      June 19, 2012 at 4:07 pm |
  3. Rich Dix

    There's only two things that disturbing about Catholics, they breed...and they vote.

    June 19, 2012 at 4:05 pm |
  4. Clinton

    Man Atheists just don't get it... Keep attacking religion... it just proves the stereotype that without Religion morality suffers greatly. the large majority of people on Earth believe in God. Acting like everyone on Earth is an idiot and you're smart doesn't make you smart. You know as well as i that you can't prove God doesn't exist and i can't prove to you that God does... so why would you spend your time attacking people for their beliefs? How is what you're doing here any different than that which you claim religion does? This makes you look very hypocritical and hateful.

    June 19, 2012 at 4:05 pm |
    • Not All Docs Play Golf

      You are so mistaken to equate religiosity with ethics and morals. Some of the worst human beings I know go to church on Sunday to be seen...it's helpful to their car dealership to be seen there.

      June 19, 2012 at 4:06 pm |
    • OOO

      Clinton,
      You said:
      "You know as well as i that you can't prove God doesn't exist and i can't prove to you that God does... so why would you spend your time attacking people for their beliefs?"

      You might as well have said:
      "You know as well as i that you can't prove the Tooth Fairy doesn't exist and i can't prove to you that the Tooth Fairy does... so why would you spend your time attacking people for their beliefs?

      Now, go on a job interview and tell them you believe in the Tooth Fairy. See if the above statement helps you get past the initial laughter.

      June 19, 2012 at 4:09 pm |
    • Jesus Christ Superstar

      Ever hear of The Crusades?

      Yeah, morals...

      June 19, 2012 at 4:09 pm |
    • trevor

      Its like saying, why are you putting so much "effort" into arguing with something that doesn't exist? Kind of like getting into a serious and heated argument with someone that believes in Santa Clause or the Easter Bunny...beyond illogical.

      June 19, 2012 at 4:11 pm |
    • ReligionIsBS

      Crusades, Jihads, and oppressing gay people are hateful. Pointing that out doesnt make me immoral. It makes me a decent human being for trying to stop it.

      June 19, 2012 at 4:14 pm |
    • Bill Deacon

      Doc, He doesn't equate religion with morality he points out that ad hominem attacks by atheist illustrate the decline of virtue in people without a sense of absolute morality as opposed to an atheistic relativism.

      Superstar, So you support the Islamic dominance of Europe I take it?

      June 19, 2012 at 4:14 pm |
    • Bush

      Agree 100% with your assessment that just because someone thinks their smart, doesn't mean that they are. You also nailed the hypocrisy aspect. Such bigotry against anyone with any form of belief.

      June 19, 2012 at 4:15 pm |
    • Bush

      Clearly, OOO stands for 3 zeros, indicating the IQ of the one who uses that handle.

      June 19, 2012 at 4:17 pm |
    • Jesus Christ Superstar

      Yes, I support it. I am on the sidelines wearing my team colors and I have the sign I spent all night making, and I'm going to hold it up.

      No, I have important things to worry about. It doesn't matter to me what religion someone is, but the Crusades were a point in history, several centuries long, where people of different religions slaughtered their fellow man in the name of practically the same god.

      June 19, 2012 at 4:20 pm |
    • Jesus Christ Superstar

      My previous comment was posted at 4:20

      FINALLY my religion is represented!

      June 19, 2012 at 4:21 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      @Clinton, you are correct. The militant brand of atheism displayed so frequently here does look hateful.

      Proselytizing, either for theism or atheism is offensive. A little more respect for people's beliefs would go a long way here.

      June 19, 2012 at 4:25 pm |
  5. Hmmmm

    why do the priests play dress up and wear gown and hats and carry around golden stuff and burn incense and ring bells and sing "let us proclaims the mystery of the faith" and splash water on people and eat horrible tasting bread pretending its a human body – sounds like some crazy middle eastern cult

    June 19, 2012 at 4:03 pm |
    • TC

      The post of someone who knows absolutely nothing of history of Christianity nor the sacramental traditions of the church. Your statement wreaks of ignorance not to mention prejudice.

      June 19, 2012 at 4:08 pm |
    • Bill Deacon

      TC you took the words right out of my mouth

      June 19, 2012 at 4:16 pm |
  6. misterjames

    Snakes talk, men live in whales for 3 days, bread rains down from the sky, a man parted the sea, chariots of fire come and go from heaven, and there's a flaming sward guarding this garden of fruit...Anyone who believes this stuff is a dummy of the highest order..Please grow up

    June 19, 2012 at 4:03 pm |
    • Bill Deacon

      You sound like someone who never got past a third grade comprehension of the Bible

      June 19, 2012 at 4:17 pm |
  7. Mary

    At last Catholics are not as crazy as those idiots in North Carolina that we've read about. Over 50 percent of Catholics recognize that their clergy have been throughout history their greatest source of embarrassment and continue to be in the present day and will continue to be so in the future. The majority think for themselves and use common sense.

    June 19, 2012 at 4:02 pm |
  8. Spawned

    Jumping from one cult to another, you can leave this one and join that one! They are all the same, none of them are for real. You don't need the church, the church needs you. God does not belong to ANY religion, should you?

    June 19, 2012 at 4:00 pm |
  9. AverageJoe76

    Anywhere in the Bible say to plaster the cross all over Earth? Didn't see that part in there....

    June 19, 2012 at 3:57 pm |
    • TC

      Well – you probably don;t know the Bible that well. Check out the part of Jesus commisssioning the aposltles to preach the gospel to the four corners of the earth.

      June 19, 2012 at 4:01 pm |
    • Colin

      Yes, "all four corners" because he had no idea it was a sphere. That is the problem with the Jewish zombie theory, their dead prophet was as ignorant as everybody else in the Early Iron Age Middle East.

      June 19, 2012 at 4:03 pm |
    • TC

      Actually, if you study the words spoken by Jesus and His responses (with objectivity of course which seems to be impossible for you), He is quite brilliant and remarkably lving and logical over the selfish dumb humans.

      June 19, 2012 at 4:05 pm |
    • AverageJoe76

      @TC – So the 'gospel' Jesus referred to, has instructions to use the cross as a symbol? Isn't it close to idol worship? And please supply those verses from the Bible, I'd like to check it out.

      June 19, 2012 at 4:08 pm |
    • TC

      Last we all checked Jesus did not list step by step instructionsl

      June 19, 2012 at 4:11 pm |
    • Bush

      So Average, you don't accept of believe in the validity of the bible at all, yet you're quizzing and questioning what it does and doesn't say? Pick up a copy and read it for yourself. Maybe you'll learn a thing or two. The bible is a guidebook, not an all-encompassing instruction manual.

      June 19, 2012 at 4:22 pm |
  10. Colin

    Well said, "Atheists get out" Evolution is nonsense. There is also another atheist theory I hate. That of childbirth.

    It is OBVOIUS to me that storks bring babies! I have never seen a woman giving birth, but I have seen a lot of storks, especially on margarine containers. If you ever go to the beach, you will lots of storks carrying babies. They look just like pelicans because they carry the babies in their mouths. If women gave birth to babies, there would be no need for a navel, but that is how the stork picks the babies up from HEAVEN.

    There is no REAL evidence that women give birth to babies. It is just a THEORY. If they did, why is it that men never give birth to babies? Why just women? Where do boys come from? It makes no sense. There is also the problem of the missing link, because there are only ever midwives and never “mid-husbands.”

    If women gave birth to babies, why are there still women and babies? And why is it you never see a half-woman, half-baby!! Explain that evolutionists and va.ginal birth believers! Bet you CAN’T.

    If you look at a stork, it is INTELLIGENTLY designed to carry babies. Why would that be if it didn’t deliver babies? And what about twins and triplets? What, do some women have 2, or even 3 uteruses? That is stupid. A stork can EASILLY carry two or three babies, but a woman couldn’t.

    Why is it that for every 50 boys born, there are 50 girls. What, can a va.gina count? Ha, how stupid. But a stork could. And, what about all the GAPS in the birth record. One time I took a peek at my mother’s va.gina, and it was so small and babies are SO BIG.

    You evolutionists are so dumb. Your think babies JUST HAPPENED in their mother’s womb. What, do you think they just appeared out of yucky, slimy blood and stuff ? Fred Hoyle once calculated that the chance of a baby spontaneously appearing in a woman’s uterus was the same as a storm blowing through a junkyard and creating a Boing-747. That’s harder to believe than that the stork brought them!

    You might like to think you came from a mere zygote, but I KNOW I came from a glorious stork.

    My father insists that I was born because he slept with my mother. I derisively call this the Big Bang theory, because he cannot tell me what happened BEFORE the Big bang. And what caused the Big Bang? It must have been a stork.

    You might ask, ok “what caused the stork?” Well the stork was always there.

    June 19, 2012 at 3:57 pm |
    • TC

      Way too long of a post – no one is going to bother to read it. Why are you atheists so botherd by believers? Why is it you think you can speak for people's personal spiritual experiences? Arrogance and hte need to feel right is why.

      June 19, 2012 at 4:00 pm |
    • Not All Docs Play Golf

      I love the parody, but you could have made that point with 2 lines. It's funny, but not worth a wall of typing.

      June 19, 2012 at 4:04 pm |
  11. LOL Religion

    Let's see, the RCC has inst.itutionalized se.xual abuse and has conspired to cover it up and protect the offenders, their stance on reproductive rights and birth control is decidedly misogynistic and has contributed to the spread of HIV and other STDs, and agents of the Church kidnapped and effectively sold thousands of Spanish, Irish, Australian and American children from the 1940s to as recently as 1987.

    Need I go on?

    This isn't just a Church, it's the largest organized crime family on the planet.

    June 19, 2012 at 3:56 pm |
  12. Matthew

    For all the athiest on here... all praise Science.

    The Sea Otters will rise!!!

    Haha Southpark is great.

    June 19, 2012 at 3:56 pm |
  13. Easy E

    I've been to a Catholic church, and it was a very pleasant environment...precisely because the parish was not big on "orthodoxy".

    Frankly, I do not understand the basis for most Catholic tenets...there is no biblical basis for prayer as merely a form of intercedency, the pope as being infallible (or any church hierarchy for that matter), the cult of saint worship, or for priests to be celibate. But, most Catholics are good people...so what can you do.

    June 19, 2012 at 3:55 pm |
    • Bill Deacon

      Not an unreasonable post. Many Catholics do not understand some of these things either. Some of them choose to leave. Others choose to stay and find the meaning. I have been a Catholic for thirty years and only lately have begun to plumb the depths this magnificent religion has to offer. I have two regrets. The first is the corruption of the faith by some who were entrusted to defend it. The second is that I waited so long to earnestly begin my walk.

      June 19, 2012 at 3:59 pm |
  14. John P

    Seems to be some automated screening algorithm that detects unambiguous, unequivocal rejection of the church and/or any expression of desire for its existence to cease. Wonder if this one gets through.

    June 19, 2012 at 3:55 pm |
  15. non-believers have killed millions upon millions

    non-believers have racked up the most deaths in the past century.Lust for power was their god.They killed because they could."Morals" and the "good person" excuse does not work.They lie

    June 19, 2012 at 3:54 pm |
    • Limper

      Who are you talking about?

      June 19, 2012 at 4:01 pm |
    • Jesus Christ Superstar

      Technically, everybody believes in something, even if that something is nothing

      June 19, 2012 at 4:03 pm |
    • non-believers have killed millions upon millions

      ww2 atheistic leaders murdered and kill nearly close to 100 million people and a few million more.

      atheists deny the darkest past of atheism

      June 19, 2012 at 4:09 pm |
    • John P

      So you're saying, "Lust for power was their god."
      I think we're on the same page. You are just calling these believers in Chairman Mao's Red Book, or Pol Pot non-believers because they don't believe in exactly what you believe in. Their differences from you are hardly discernible . You both "believe" and insist on imposing your beliefs on others, and that's why you all cause so much harm and misery to others. Maybe Stalin is more efficient, but the Catholic Church compensates with persistence and longevity.

      June 19, 2012 at 4:10 pm |
    • Jesus Christ Superstar

      @non-believers have killed millions upon millions

      Who do you mean exactly? Because the people who killed the most during ww2 were in no way atheist. Do some research.

      June 19, 2012 at 4:24 pm |
    • Limper

      Atheistic leaders in WW2? Are you talking about Hitler, who was demonstrably Christian? Or are you dragging out that old chestnut about Stalin being atheist? Hirohito maybe? Nope, he was Shinto.

      If it's the Stalin thing, please cite any sources where he killed in the name of atheism.

      June 19, 2012 at 4:27 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      Ages later (after discovering "J.panese" on the rude word list ...

      @non-believers have .. etc,

      So you're saying that Stalin killed 100,000,000 people? (All the other WW2 leaders were religious, at least in name.)

      Uncle Joe wasn't very nice, but I think you have your 'facts' wrong.

      The United States killed 100s of 1000s of innocent J.panese civilians in cities like Tokyo, Hiroshima and Nagasaki too,
      not counting German civilians in Dresden and Köln. What's your point?

      June 19, 2012 at 4:57 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      And he the total WW2 deathtoll, while horrific is in the order of 50 – 75 million, military, civilian, everyone. An estimated of 22 – 25 million of these were combatants.

      Unimaginably horrible, but far short of the assertions that atheist leaders killed "close to 100 million".

      June 19, 2012 at 5:04 pm |
  16. AZ1962

    I say GO and take the church with you...

    June 19, 2012 at 3:54 pm |
  17. Atheists get out

    damned atheists should be forced to convert or get the hell out of the country

    June 19, 2012 at 3:53 pm |
    • scoobypoo

      Agreed.
      They need to immediately convert to the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster.
      Pray to your pasta.

      June 19, 2012 at 3:57 pm |
    • Easy E

      And you sir will soon be forced to take your meds by men in white coats if you don't settle down REAL fast.

      June 19, 2012 at 3:57 pm |
    • Jesus Christ Superstar

      If I convert, what do I get? Because the church down the road offered me a good seat in the Heaven Movie Theater, and a new toaster for my Heaven Apartment. What do you offer me to convert to you, angry one?

      June 19, 2012 at 4:04 pm |
    • Atheists get out

      dont care what you convert to but if you are american you believe in God atheists are not american and deserve less than dogs

      June 19, 2012 at 4:10 pm |
    • sam stone

      come and get us, big mouth

      June 19, 2012 at 4:17 pm |
    • Jesus Christ Superstar

      @Atheists get out

      Well, I do believe in god, just not your God, and I am sure as heck more of an American than you, because I believe in life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness for ALL mankind! And I believe in equality for every single person on this continent and the little islands we call our own. If you want to hate people, go to Syria.

      June 19, 2012 at 4:26 pm |
  18. scoobypoo

    Yes, catholicism is way stoopid (all religion is) but the fundamentalists and evangelicals are even stoopider as catholic schools at least acknowledge and teach evolution.

    June 19, 2012 at 3:52 pm |
    • Atheists get out

      you are a fvckin idiot evolution is sh!t

      June 19, 2012 at 3:55 pm |
    • Colin

      Agreed, it pretty much goes something like this

      Atheists
      Agnostics
      Moderate believers
      Catholics
      Po.odles and Corgis
      Evangelicals
      Fundamentalists
      Mormons
      Scientoligists
      Muslims

      June 19, 2012 at 3:55 pm |
  19. Honey Badger Dont Care

    It should be illegal to display a medieval torture device around your neck or on a building.

    June 19, 2012 at 3:51 pm |
    • Bill Deacon

      That's the beauty of Christ. A medieval torture device becomes a symbol of saving grace.

      June 19, 2012 at 4:05 pm |
  20. Colin

    Can a Catholic please help me? I am having trouble distinguishing the third example of circular reasoning from the first two. Perhaps you can explain the difference.

    “I believe Obama is a great man because his biography says so, and the reason I believe his biography is that it is about Obama, who is a great man.”

    “I believe David Koresh was a wise and great prophet because the Branch Davidians wrote a book saying he is. I believe that book because it was inspired by David Koresh, a wise and great prophet.”

    “I believe God exists because it says so in the Bible. I believe the Bible because it is the inspired word of God.”

    June 19, 2012 at 3:51 pm |
    • scoobypoo

      I always look forward to Colin's concise, and often humorous, commentary.
      Well said.

      June 19, 2012 at 3:54 pm |
    • Colin

      Tahnks my doggie-detective friend. Probably gets tedious after I post the same thing a lot, but the readers change and anything to help young people escape religion is worth doing.

      June 19, 2012 at 3:58 pm |
    • sturgeonslawyer

      Well, a Catholic does not reason that way. We believe that the Bible is inspired because the Church says so, not because it says so. (In fact, it doesn't. Nowhere in the Bible will you find a claim that the Bible - with this specific table of contents, etc. - is "the inspired Word of God.")

      June 19, 2012 at 3:59 pm |
    • Someone

      ummm... it's called faith... the belief in something unexplained or intangible... so.... that's why it's a faith and not something that could be understood by substantiating with other 'worldly' definitions or evidence

      June 19, 2012 at 4:02 pm |
    • Madtown

      We believe that the Bible is inspired because the Church says so
      -----
      Yes, of course. And, they would certainly know! They also have a very vested interest in making certain you believe that. They must be very happy with you!

      June 19, 2012 at 4:03 pm |
    • OOO

      @sturgeonslawyer
      THE CHARACTER OF THE BIBLE

      THE BIBLE IS THE WORD OF GOD.
      Then the LORD stretched out His hand and touched my mouth, and the LORD said to me, "Behold, I have put My words in your mouth." (Jeremiah 1:9).

      The Bible is more than a book detailing men's thoughts about what God is like. It is God's communication to men. His words are transmitted to us through its pages. It is one thing to read theology books that tell about God; it is quite another to read God's love letters to you.

      It is noteworthy to see the process by which this took place in the case of the book of Jeremiah.

      God gave His message to Jeremiah
      ®
      Jeremiah dictated to Baruch
      ®
      Baruch wrote the message
      ®
      Baruch read the message in the temple

      In spite of this process, it is the Word of God that is said to be both the original message as well as the end of the process.

      This same process is seen in the New Testament in 1 Thessalonians 2:13 where Paul says, "When you received from us the word of God"s message [literally, "the word of hearing of God"], you accepted it not as the word of men, but for what it really is, the word of God, which also performs its work in you who believe."

      June 19, 2012 at 4:04 pm |
    • Bill Deacon

      The only real circular reasoning I see goes "I think Colin is so witty and smart because he can make fun of things he is ignorant about and I agree with him so that makes me smart too"

      June 19, 2012 at 4:09 pm |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.