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Islamic sect has appealing message for U.S. politicians but has global enemies
Hadhrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad, the leader of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, presides over a sermon to his followers in suburban Washington, D.C.
July 7th, 2012
01:00 AM ET

Islamic sect has appealing message for U.S. politicians but has global enemies

By Dan Merica, CNN

Washington (CNN) – You’ve almost certainly never heard of him, but Hadhrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad drew some serious star power at a recent Capitol Hill reception in his honor.

House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi and Republican Sen. John Cornyn were among the many lawmakers who showed up to meet Ahmad, a Muslim leader who was in town last week on a rare U.S. visit from London.

At a time when the United States is struggling with its views about Islam – as Islamists gain power in the Middle East and with ongoing concerns about Quran-citing terrorists – it’s not hard to see Ahmad’s appeal to both parties. As he said in his Capitol Hill speech, he has “love for all, hatred for none.”

It’s a sentiment that Sen. Robert Casey, Democrat of Pennsylvania, echoed in introducing Ahmad, praising the “leadership you have shown to tolerance and to peace.”

It’s not just Ahmad who espouses his can’t-we-all-get-along read on Islam. The 61-year-old is the spiritual leader of the global Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, whose friendliness toward the West and whose criticism of other Muslims has earned the sect allies at the highest level of the U.S government, even as it faces mortal enemies in other parts of the world.

CNN’s Belief Blog: The faith angles behind the biggest stories

Unlike most Muslims, Ahmadis believe that the 19th century founder of their sect was the metaphorical Second Coming of Jesus Christ.

It’s because of that belief that Sunni and Shiite Muslims do not regard Ahmadis as true Muslims. The rift has provoked Egypt to charge Ahmadis with blasphemy, Saudi Arabia to deport them and Pakistan to pass a law that designates Ahmadis as non-Muslims.

Persecuted abroad

On a sweltering recent Friday, a long line of people sat patiently in a mosque on the outskirts of Silver Spring, Maryland, just outside Washington. Despite the heat and humidity, they seemed happy to be there, waiting for a chance to meet the leader of their faith.

Hadhrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad, who leads an international Ahmadi community is the sect’s fifth Khalifa, or leader. The group claims tens of millions of followers around the world, but outside experts say the number is smaller, in the millions.

For Ahmad and his followers, their relatively small sect is the real face of Islam, which has more than a billion followers around the world.

“It is time that we, the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, should give the real and true picture of Islam,” Ahmad said in an interview inside the Silver Spring mosque. “I will always be talking about peace. That peace is not from myself or some new teaching but it is the true, real teaching which I gather and get from the holy Quran.”

That emphasis, says Ahsanullah Zafar, the leader of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community USA, is rooted in a belief that the only jihad worth practicing is against one’s own self – a jihad of self-improvement. The word jihad is often translated as struggle or war.

“Even more important than prayer, which we talk about a lot, is how you behave as a human being,” Zafar said. “It is not physical fighting that accomplishes anything. It is dialogue and the progressivism that leads somewhere.”

Founded in 1889, the Ahmadiyya Muslim sect is the only Islamic group that believes that a second prophet has come, in the form of Mirza Ghulam Ahmad. Ahmad lived at a time of great religious upheaval, said Akbar Ahmed, chair of Islamic Studies at American University.

“In India, Mirza Ghulam Ahmad said that he has the message of the renewal of Islam,” Ahmed said. “Slowly it began to build momentum - it is a kind of spirited, modern version of Islam.”

Ahmed characterized the makeup of the Ahmadis as “very scholarly, very prominent leaders in Pakistan.”

But when the Jamaat-e-Islami, an Islamist political party in Pakistan, began to push the country to a more orthodox view of Islam in the 1970s, the Ahmadis were cast out.

Jamaat-e-Islami argued that the Ahmadis did not conform to a key tenet of Islam – the finality of the prophet Mohammed. “That is the elephant in the room for the Ahmadis,” said American University’s Ahmed. “The Ahmadis say that there are two kind of prophets. One is the lawgiver. Then there are messengers who come with a message and not necessarily a new book.”

In light of the crackdown, many Ahmadis began to leave Pakistan, some as religious refugees. Large numbers of Ahmadis now live in Germany, England, Ghana, Canada and the United States, where the Ahmadis claim tens of thousands of followers.

But persecution persists.

In 2010, almost 100 people were killed when two Ahmadi mosques in Lahore, Pakistan, were attacked by men armed with hand grenades and AK-47s.

In the U.S. government’s 2012 International Religious Freedom Report, the plight of Pakistan’s Ahmadis was front and center.

“Among Pakistan‘s religious minorities, Ahmadis are subject to the most severe legal restrictions and officially sanctioned discrimination,” reads the report. The same report outlined violence against Ahmadis in Indonesia, where it said that at least 50 Ahmadiyya mosques have been vandalized.

A unique view of Islam

Harsh treatment in various corners of the world has instilled a deep Ahmadi appreciation for life in the United States.

“In America, all these small Muslim communities are flourishing, they love being in America,” said Ahmed. “They are 100% Muslim and they are 100% American.”

Ahmad, the Ahmadis’ current leader, was in the United States for the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community’s annual convention, which drew 10,000 to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, last week.

“Wherever I go I have one goal … to meet my people,” Ahmad said.

But he was also here to meet politicians and journalists. For the Ahmadis, the scrutiny of American Muslims in the decade since 9/11 has been treated as an opportunity to discuss beliefs and answer questions.

Many in the community came out in favor of Rep. Peter King’s, R-New York, insistence last year on holding congressional hearings on radicalization within American Islam, even as other Muslim groups blasted the hearings as anti-Muslim.

“If the government thinks that congressional hearings will improve homeland security and help expose those exploiting Islam, I assure full cooperation. I, too, aspire to have a more secure America,” wrote Kashif N. Chaudhry, the director of an Ahmadi youth program in the United States, in a New York Times letter to the editor.

Chaudhry was hardly the only Ahmadi Muslim to speak up.

“You need to be with other people, you need to talk about your ideas and in that conversation and discussion, new things arise,” said Zafar. “It is like throwing the seed and putting water on it, you need the seed and you need the water for it to sprout.”

“We need to come together with the people around us in the United States, we need to do that and see how it flowers,” he continued.

The split between the Ahmadis and other Islamic sects is also apparent in how Ahmad, the sect’s leader, talks about extremists.

“Nowadays, Islam is being targeted only because of so-called Muslim groups who claim themselves to be Muslims but are not following the true teachings of Islam,” Ahmad said, speaking of what he calls “fundamentalists Muslims.” “If it is that Islam that is being portrayed by those orthodox Muslims, then I don’t think there is any chance in spreading Islam.”

Using terms like “so-called Muslims,” to refer to some outsiders has not endeared Ahmadis to other Muslims. Leading Sunni and Shiite groups are reluctant to even talk about the Ahmadis.

CNN contacted the Council on American-Islamic Relations and the Islamic Society of North America, two major Muslim groups, and neither responded to requests for comment.

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A future in America

Zafar, the leader of the Ahmadis in the United States, said his sect is looking to grow.

The group has an organized media operation and operates three 24/7 satellite-television channels under the name Muslim Television Ahmadiyya International.

The initial purpose of the channels was to broadcast the sermons of the Khalifa, but it also provides other programs in different languages. The Silver Spring mosque is surrounded by large satellite dishes that beam the shows around the world.

In addition to satellite television, the Ahmadis run Islam International Publications, a publishing outfit.

Many Ahmadis are concerned about the version of Islam being portrayed in the media, which they say is too focused on the radical elements of Islam and not focused enough on peaceful Muslims.

“Right now there is a caricature of Islam,” said Zafar. “The biggest challenge I believe in the United States is for Muslims to get out of that image of extremist behaviors which are so popular in the press.”

Ahmed of American University sees the future of the Ahmadis as a bridge between Islam and the West.

“On the American side, they [the Ahmadis] are acting as a positive bridge to Islam and the Americans need that right now,” he said. “And then for Muslims, if they do link up and join mainstream Muslims, they are able to give Islam a link to the world and also help them work out these polemics that are tearing the world apart.”

For now, Ahmadis are stuck in between those two worlds.

Editor's note: An earlier version of this story incorrectly said that Ahmadi Muslims believe their founder was the Second Coming of the Prophet Mohammed. They believe he was the metaphorical Second Coming of Jesus Christ.

- Dan Merica

Filed under: Islam

soundoff (1,074 Responses)
  1. alfred

    "metaphorical Second Coming of Jesus Christ."??...LMFAO!!
    Both Muslims & Christians believe that the second coming of jesus would bring the end of the world....
    & I am still wasting my time on CNN

    July 7, 2012 at 7:12 pm |
  2. Bill Maher Nails It

    Awesome video.

    [youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KAvDtPz33w0&w=640&h=360]

    July 7, 2012 at 7:11 pm |
  3. Muslim Manager

    Most loved?

    No, they are ALL hated.

    GO BACK HOME. WE DON'T WANT YOU IN AMERICA!

    July 7, 2012 at 7:11 pm |
  4. JulieMS

    "Ahmadis believe that the 19th century founder of their sect was the metaphorical Second Coming of Jesus Christ." Just another false religion with false claims and deception.

    July 7, 2012 at 7:06 pm |
  5. Matt

    I can't name one Muslim country that I would want think is safe to live in for non-muslims. Maybe Turkey.

    July 7, 2012 at 7:02 pm |
    • Haggy

      You just invalidated your own comment

      July 7, 2012 at 7:07 pm |
    • Friedrich Nietzsche

      So sorry about Turkey.

      http://www.persecution.org/?s=%20&cat=61

      July 7, 2012 at 7:10 pm |
  6. Your Religion Might Be Bullshіt If...

    This is a great video.

    [youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-z4iaUFSkME&w=640&h=360]

    July 7, 2012 at 6:57 pm |
    • John

      Awesome. 🙂

      July 7, 2012 at 7:01 pm |
  7. Wastrel

    It seems that although they may be non-violent, and they are evidently persecuted by other Muslims, they have the same goal: a world Islamic state. I'd like to see them deny it, at any rate. And if he finds peace in the Koran, with its exhortations to kill unbelievers, he's reading a censored version.

    July 7, 2012 at 6:54 pm |
    • llɐq ʎʞɔnq

      Just like Yahweh, who said to kill disobedient children, and many others. So if Allah and Yahweh are out, who left ?

      July 7, 2012 at 6:58 pm |
    • Kingofthenet

      You don't want YOUR religion to be successful and expand?

      July 7, 2012 at 6:59 pm |
    • Wastrel

      Bucky Ball, I agree that none of them are any good, but bringing up the others doesn't help. If I say the apples are rotten, why would you tell me oranges are rotten, too?

      July 7, 2012 at 7:01 pm |
    • Peace2All

      @Buckminster

      Hello my friend ! Hope that you have been well. I believe I owe you some email replys ! 😀

      Chat at ya' soon...

      Peace...

      July 7, 2012 at 7:07 pm |
    • Wastrel

      KingOfTheNet, I really don't care. My religion, if I have one, is personal to me and really no one else's business. I'm not trying to spread it. I don't think that should be the goal of any religion. Religions, once they are organized, become power structures and inevitably try to take over, make money, etc. and these are not religious activities to my way of thinking.

      July 7, 2012 at 7:07 pm |
    • llɐq ʎʞɔnq

      Hey peacey. All IS well. You still working like a fool ?

      July 7, 2012 at 7:26 pm |
    • Peace2All

      @Bucky

      Yeah... been toooooo busy lately.

      Have you been 'schoolin' everyone here on the blogs ? It's been quite awhile since I have been on.

      Hopefully, I'll be back a bit more.

      Peace...

      July 7, 2012 at 7:28 pm |
    • llɐq ʎʞɔnq

      Actually I've been gone too. Busy at school. Exciting about the Higgs, no ? Have been asked on-board doing "science advice" for a well known "debator". I'll tell ya about it in email.

      July 7, 2012 at 7:39 pm |
    • Peace2All

      @Bucky

      Yes... very exciting news about the Higgs-Boson. Which brings me to one of my favorite jokes I read this week, which you may have already seen:

      "A Higgs-Boson walks into a Catholic Church and a Priest says...'Hey... you can't be here'... to which the Higgs-Boson replys: Well, without me, how can you have...'mass.' ! LOL 😀

      Sorry... couldn't resist !

      Send me an email and update me on these exciting new activities you are involved in, yes !

      Peace...

      July 7, 2012 at 7:45 pm |
    • llɐq ʎʞɔnq

      Ha ha ! 😈

      July 7, 2012 at 7:54 pm |
    • natasha

      Wastrel, let me correct you there. Quran does not tell them to kill the nonbelievers.I am sure you have misunderstood a lot of things and FYI it tells them to just take care of themselves. you tell me if somebody was persecuting you for days and wanted to battle against you would you just tsand there and smile and be killed or fight back? Quran just tells them to protect yourselves and never hurt anybody and try to forgive and forget. but there is alimit to everything. they keep on forgiving and forgetting and losing their brothers and sisters? so they will have to take a step but they havent hurt anybody.you should get into the details of things before saying anything against it.

      July 9, 2012 at 12:32 pm |
  8. charanbir

    i as a Sikh , think this is what is needed for the Muslim community right now,
    i hope all Muslims join together because, in my heart i know Islam is not about the extremism being displayed by media
    every religion is created by god, and is his command.
    sometimes we as human fail to recognize the true message.
    We should all stay humble though, today this happened to Muslims, tommorow it could happen to me with my religion, it could happen to the Christians, it could happen to any community.
    be clever and do not point fingers just from hearing things. do your own study, learn the truth for yourself before pointing fingers.
    never judge religion by its people, we are learners of religion we could make mistakes comprehending the scriptures.
    but the step made by this sect to clarify the true message of its religion is a great service, God bless you.

    July 7, 2012 at 6:54 pm |
    • Friedrich Nietzsche

      You're either a fool or a Muslim. Hey, how about those Sikhs that blew up a Canadian passenger jet? That was pretty peacefull. Or the Sikhs that refused to remove their turbans at JFK airport? Boy, that was cooperative, peaceful and understanding.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:56 pm |
    • charanbir

      lol your very funny, like i said learn religion, dont judge by peoples action.

      ur acting like non religious people never commit sins

      July 7, 2012 at 6:58 pm |
    • charanbir

      thats like me judging your family by ur foolish comments. thats not nice?

      im sure your family members dont all share your same brainless comments lol

      July 7, 2012 at 7:00 pm |
    • Friedrich Nietzsche

      Sure they do. They just don't try to mitigate it with religious dogma.

      July 7, 2012 at 7:01 pm |
    • Friedrich Nietzsche

      Well, that was pretty cute. Obviously I was responding to your "lol your very funny," post.

      July 7, 2012 at 7:02 pm |
    • charanbir

      god will forgive you , your just knowledgeless lol .

      July 7, 2012 at 7:02 pm |
    • Friedrich Nietzsche

      Let me be very clear, Singh. I dislike and distrust -any- religion- that thinks they're superior.

      Including yours.

      July 7, 2012 at 7:03 pm |
    • charanbir

      okay, but what fact do you have to prove my religion think its superior .
      please provide me with proof 🙂
      or any religion for instance
      the follows might think they are superior.
      not the religion itself

      July 7, 2012 at 7:06 pm |
    • charanbir

      let me give you a little example.

      police officers jobs are to enforce law.
      Theres a bunch of officers that are honest, truthful, and follow law while enforcing it
      then theres others that think they are superior because they are given authority.

      are you going to judge the whole police community? no.

      in that same police community, there's people saving lives, showing youth the right way with their informaiton sessions.
      same way
      religion has people that understand and act according to its teachings.
      then there's others that think they have some divine authority to act and have control.

      July 7, 2012 at 7:11 pm |
    • Friedrich Nietzsche

      The Sikh gang violence across Canada must be simply 'extremist' behavior. Poor Edmonton. Poor BC. Poor Air India flight 182.

      Idiot Canada for putting up with it. I know! Let's get some more Sikh politicians in the Canadian Parliament! That'll fix it!

      http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2012/03/28/jonathan-kay-why-are-some-canadian-sikhs-expressing-solidarity-with-an-unrepentant-terrorist/

      July 7, 2012 at 7:16 pm |
    • charanbir

      i didn't look at that article yet, but refer to my previous comments.
      open your eyes my friend.
      if you think someone is evil and doing the wrong thing , try making a change instead of posting things up here.
      actions speak louder then words.

      July 7, 2012 at 7:18 pm |
    • Friedrich Nietzsche

      Add this to my earlier comment:

      I don't trust any religion that cannot control it's members. If you've got "bad Sikhs" among you, then -you- deal with them. Your failure to do so is nothing but acquiescence and silent endorsement (or outright propagandist lies).

      July 7, 2012 at 7:19 pm |
    • charanbir

      sure im posting aswell,
      but im not being so judgemental, i dont follow islam, but i dont make senseless comments.
      study, learn about the topic before you judge by watching the media.

      trust me im getting nothing out of doing this. but because i think its the right thing i support it.
      you should do the same learn before speaking

      July 7, 2012 at 7:21 pm |
    • charanbir

      lol my friend, deep down in your heart , you know the right answer to your own question , your just being really silly.
      like i said, police cant control their police officers.
      a father cant control his son , when hes out commiting a crime or doing drugs.

      how can religion do that?
      anywho , the example is right in front of your eyes, this sect is trying to control its members.
      so there you go , you got your answer lol 🙂
      your a good man, no hard feelings bro.

      July 7, 2012 at 7:23 pm |
    • charanbir

      and this is the reply to your earlier article post by jonathan kay from nationalpost.

      http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2012/03/30/counterpoint-balwant-singh-rajoana-case-is-about-the-rule-of-law-in-india/

      by the way jonathan also responsed to this article after he was enlightend about the situation and even apologized.
      let me find the article for you

      July 7, 2012 at 7:31 pm |
    • Friedrich Nietzsche

      I'm a firm believer that one doesn't "learn" about something by their words – only by their deeds. No amount of propaganda can overcome actual behavior, so, good luck with that.

      http://www.theepochtimes.com/n2/canada/sikh-extremism-on-the-rise-in-canada-says-terrorism-expert-34375.html

      Sure, no "hard feelings bro." At least until you try this crap in my town.

      July 7, 2012 at 7:32 pm |
    • charanbir

      well sure i agree its not good that he received threats, but this mans objective was to degrade the sikh community in canada since it has such a big sikh population.
      this article doesent talk about when he had a big speach in front of canadians about sikhs being terrorists and the only example he used to prove it was the extremist .
      sure their might some bad extremist in sikhism aswell.
      that doesent mean you degrade the whole community.

      like i said thorough research is needed , which you wont find by a single article my friend.

      July 7, 2012 at 7:44 pm |
    • charanbir

      if that was the case and sikhs were such big terrorists and commited crimes, based on the high sikh population in ontario canada.
      the ontario prisons and jails must be full with a high number of sikhs.
      which isent true.
      you can do the research and check up on that.

      by the way im not defending my religion.
      i know theres alot of wrong people in my community.

      thats life though. if you never committed a sin in your life. you would be in heaven by now
      i my self am not totally sinless.
      but thats life.

      July 7, 2012 at 7:48 pm |
    • charanbir

      and if somone is a sinner , he will receive his punishment according to his deeds from the divine judge (god)

      and no one can escape his punishment hes the real judge.

      July 7, 2012 at 8:07 pm |
    • Friedrich Nietzsche

      Whatever. If you eastern zealots try to riot and loot in my neighborhood and attack my family, home or property, I've got a .223 with your face on it. And guess what? Where I live, that's legal! That rioting crap in Britain would've lasted about five minutes in good ol' "Redneck USA." Not a problem.

      July 7, 2012 at 8:21 pm |
  9. Raheel

    True Islam! Zindabad!

    July 7, 2012 at 6:53 pm |
  10. John

    Awesome video below. Very funny.

    July 7, 2012 at 6:46 pm |
    • John

      And I'm a complete idiot.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:54 pm |
    • John

      There are too many Johns commenting here. But check out the video, it is very poignant.

      July 7, 2012 at 7:00 pm |
  11. Geraldo

    Americans, Muslims and the rest of the world need to educate themselves in the knowledge of the Holy Bible/New Testament. All humanity need to repend and convert to The Only One and True God: Jesus Christ. Then, we will have real peace and love around the world.

    July 7, 2012 at 6:45 pm |
    • natasha

      GERALDO do you believe that bible was written by a man on earth?

      July 7, 2012 at 6:47 pm |
    • charanbir

      every religion is truthful and real, there's no such thing as old or new, god doesn't get old or new. he is ageless, birth less, formless.

      every religion will get you to your destination (God)
      only if you follow it with your heart and do good deeds

      July 7, 2012 at 6:56 pm |
    • llɐq ʎʞɔnq

      Yes they do need to start educating themselves about the Bible. That way, there is no way in hell anyone could possibly ever buy that BS. Once you know that Yahweh was the 70th son of El Elion, who got assigned to Isra-El, to be god of their armies, there goes the OT. As for the NT, Yeshua was an itinerant apocalyptic preacher, one of many at that time, one of many who were called "sons" of god, one of many who were seen to perform miracles, and there goes the NT. So yes indeed get an education.

      July 7, 2012 at 7:30 pm |
  12. natasha

    I wish you guys could understand that Ahmadiyyat really is a true religion. I could write a lot of stuff here to prove you that bt you dont need proof. if u just meet an ahmadi you will understand. i pity you people. 🙂

    July 7, 2012 at 6:44 pm |
    • Wastrel

      That's super, natasha. Every religion is a real religion. I mistrust these people because they do not disavow the Islamic goals of a worldwide religious state and they continue to say that the Koran is a book of peace, which is either their delusion or a lie.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:58 pm |
  13. Bob Rozer

    I dont trust him.
    http://www.sledgereport.com

    July 7, 2012 at 6:43 pm |
  14. Kingofthenet

    As an Atheist, I prefer these people do their 'good works' on just Humanitarian Grounds, that being said, IF you follow a peaceful religion, I have no qualms with you Brother.

    July 7, 2012 at 6:37 pm |
  15. Atheism is not healthy for children and other living things

    Prayer changes otherwise rational adults into believing in imaginary friends.

    July 7, 2012 at 6:35 pm |
    • sharkfisher

      If you want to raise your children to be Godless heathens no one is trying to stop you. As for me and my house we will serve the Lord.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:45 pm |
    • John

      @SharkFisher, is Lord what you call Santa, Allah or some other childish fairytale?

      July 7, 2012 at 6:50 pm |
  16. .

    CNN is the network for muzzies and
    ho
    mo
    se
    xuals.

    And you're not allowed to print one of those words without concealing it.

    And they can't figure out why no one watches.

    Go figure.

    July 7, 2012 at 6:33 pm |
    • John

      Why do you emphasise the word homosexual?

      July 7, 2012 at 6:37 pm |
    • .

      Well, I'll be danged. You got past the CNN sensor.

      That's why.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:40 pm |
    • John

      Or maybe you might just like the homosexuals.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:44 pm |
    • .

      Funny, you have no problem with the word muzzies.

      Or do you?

      July 7, 2012 at 6:49 pm |
    • .

      H
      o
      m
      o
      s
      e
      x
      u
      a
      l
      s.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:50 pm |
    • John

      I'm gay. You got a problem with that?

      I'm kissing my boyfriend right now!

      July 7, 2012 at 6:51 pm |
    • John

      I do not speak your language.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:52 pm |
    • .

      No. Knock your lights out, Tinkerbell.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:52 pm |
    • Friedrich Nietzsche

      I don't believe you . Rim him and post the video.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:54 pm |
    • John

      @dot, either there are mutliple 'Johns' commenting here or you are changing your name. Just come out of the closet. Nobody cares anymore.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:55 pm |
    • John

      My boyfriend is rimming me right now!

      July 7, 2012 at 6:55 pm |
    • John

      I'm a gay atheist. And I love to #@# my boyfriend's D9323.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:57 pm |
    • .

      Geez..... you are one screwed up guy, John.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:57 pm |
    • Alonzo

      John's a nut job.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:58 pm |
    • Friedrich Nietzsche

      someone needs an html enti ties lesson. I don't bother with them. There's quicker ways to play.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:59 pm |
    • Bob

      @Alonzo, which John are you talking about? There a few commenting here. A couple are Christians trying to imitate non-Christians.

      July 7, 2012 at 7:09 pm |
    • Eric

      There are way too many people posting under the name of John right now. Can you people please choose different names?

      July 7, 2012 at 7:20 pm |
    • llɐq ʎʞɔnq

      Ho'mophobes are latent gays. Here's the proof. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8772014

      July 7, 2012 at 7:32 pm |
    • Friedrich Nietzsche

      @ llɐq ʎʞɔnq

      So, they showed all of 60 guys, hom ophobic or not, le sbian videos and then measured their di cks? I mean, really... who doesn't like le sbians? Come 'on. What kind of propaganda artist are you?

      July 7, 2012 at 8:35 pm |
  17. more2bits

    Liar liar pants on fire! Islam is not a religion of peace but of war. There are so many phrases in the Koan which order followers to kill infidels that it's ridiculous.

    July 7, 2012 at 6:30 pm |
    • sharkfisher

      Very well said.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:47 pm |
    • Sarkar

      The Bible has more violent verses. Just read it from the beginning.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:55 pm |
    • Kahlotus

      So does the Bible. See Luke 19:26-27, Deuteronomy 13: 7-11, and John 15:6

      July 7, 2012 at 7:03 pm |
    • Sarkar

      i like to clarify more. It is not only Islam or Judaism or Christianity, violence and intolerance are the very nature of all Abrahamic religions. Look at Hinduism. It consists of many sects. They differ with each other much more than three Abrahamic religions do with each other, but still the Hindus coexist as followers of one religion (of course I acknowledge the caste system in it, but that is another subject). Only these three Abramic religions believe that all human beings came from Adam and Eve, Noah's ark and the deluge, stories of Abraham, Isaac, Ishmael, Joseph, Jacob, Moses, Aaron, David, Solomon. Islam reveres Moses than the Jews themselves. Jesus' immaculate birth, miracles that he performed and virginity of Mary are part of Islamic belief. Muslims even believe in the second coming of Jesus and his fight with anti-Christ. But yet after all these similarities, they show so much hate and intolerance to each other.

      July 7, 2012 at 7:08 pm |
  18. Your Religion Might Be Bullshіt If ....

    This is a great video clip!

    [youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-z4iaUFSkME&w=640&h=360]

    July 7, 2012 at 6:28 pm |
    • John

      Great video.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:46 pm |
  19. Lupus the Great

    Ban all religion now.

    July 7, 2012 at 6:24 pm |
    • Unknown

      Can't.Violates human freedom..

      Atheists are powerless.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:26 pm |
    • Lupus the Great

      Religion is not a human right.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:28 pm |
    • John

      Reason and rational thought is not powerless.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:28 pm |
    • Unknown

      oh but the controlling atheists are powerless to stop any type of evii.

      You guys live in a fairy tale world.Not reality.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:32 pm |
    • pluckey

      Unknown,
      Rational thought has opened the minds of countless religious people, freeing them from the burdon of their opressive belief systems.

      Pretty powerful in my mind.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:34 pm |
    • Lupus the Great

      ....as opposed to? LOL!

      July 7, 2012 at 6:34 pm |
    • Unknown

      They are controlled by people not the belief itself.2 different things atheists typically confuse.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:49 pm |
    • sharkfisher

      You and your godless like presume to think for everyone else? You are either a communist or a dunce.

      July 7, 2012 at 6:51 pm |
  20. MichelleOhhhh

    I hate all suicide bombers and wife beaters.

    July 7, 2012 at 6:24 pm |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.