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Creationists hit back at Bill Nye with their own video
"The idea of deep time ... explains so much of the world around us," Bill Nye said in the viral video.
August 31st, 2012
04:34 PM ET

Creationists hit back at Bill Nye with their own video

By Eric Marrapodi, CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor
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(CNN) - Bill Nye's viral YouTube video pleading with parents not to teach their children to deny evolution has spawned an online life of its own, with prominent creationists hitting back against the popular TV host.

"Time is Nye for a Rebuttal," Ken Ham the CEO of Answers in Genesis writes on his website. Answers in Genesis is the Christian ministry behind the Creation Museum in Petersburg, Kentucky.

Nye's criticism of creationism went viral earlier this week, after being posted last Thursday.

"I say to the grownups, if you want to deny evolution and live in your world, that's completely inconsistent with the world we observe, that's fine. But don't make your kids do it," Nye says in his Big Think video, which has been viewed nearly 3 million times.

Ham writes that Nye is joining in with other evolutionists who say teaching children to deny evolution is a form of "child abuse." That idea comes in part from the atheist scientist Richard Dawkins, who in his book "The God Delusion" argues against exposing children to religion before they are old enough to fully understand it.

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"At AiG and the Creation Museum, we teach children and adults the truth concerning who they are in the Creator’s eyes — and where they came from," Ham writes. "We tell people that they do have purpose and meaning in life and that they were created for a purpose. "No, we are not just evolved animals as Nye believes; we are all made in the image of God."

Ham is the public face of a group that academics call Young Earth Creationists, though they prefer to be called Biblical Creationists. They believe in a literal interpretation of the creation account in the book of Genesis found in the Bible.

The Creation Museum also produced its own rebuttal video on YouTube that features two of their staff scientists, both Ph.Ds, David Menton and Georgia Purdom.

"[Nye] might be interested to know I also teach my young daughter about evolution and I know many Christian parents who do the same," Purdom says in the video. "Children should be exposed to both ideas concerning our past."

For the past 30 years, one popular method for Creationists to advance their cause has been to make an equal-time argument,with Creationism taught alongside evolution. In the late 1980s, some state legislatures passed bills that promoted the idea of a balanced treatment of both ideas in the classroom.

In 1987, the issue made it all the way to the Supreme Court, where a Louisiana "equal-time law" was struck down. The court ruled that teaching creationism in public school class rooms was a violation of the Establishment Cause in the Constitution, which is commonly referred to as the separation of church and state.

A key point between most scientists and many creationists is the timing for the origin of the world.

Your Take: 5 reactions to Bill Nye's creationism critique

Nye's argument falls in line with the vast majority of scientists, who date the age of the earth as 4.5 billion years old and the universe as 14.5 billion years old.

"The idea of deep time of billions of years explains so much of the world around us. If you try to ignore that, your worldview becomes crazy, untenable, itself inconsistent," Nye says in his viral video.

Young Earth Creationists say the weeklong account of God creating the earth and everything in it represents six 24-hour periods (plus one day of rest) and date the age of the earth between 6,000 and 10,000 years.

"Yes we see fossils and distant stars, but the history on how they got there really depends on our worldview," Purdom says in the museum's rebuttal. "Do we start with man's ideas, who wasn't here during man's supposed billions of years of earth history or do we start with the Bible, the written revelation of the eyewitness account of the eternal God who created it all?"

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Polling from Gallup has shown for the past 30 years that between 40-46% of the survey respondents believe in Creationism, that God created humans and the world in the past 10,000 years.

The most recent poll showed belief in atheistic evolution was on the rise at 16%, nearly double what it had been in previous years. The poll also found 32% of respondents believe in evolution guided by God.

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Belief • Christianity • Creationism • Science

soundoff (5,973 Responses)
  1. 21k

    creationism will save a lot of money in the classroom. all you need to memorize is:
    1. god made it;
    2. god did it;
    3. god works in strange ways( ie, hitler, tsunamis);

    September 1, 2012 at 11:51 am |
    • Moby Schtick

      And just remember kids, the answer is always "C" which reads, "Invisible sky wizard did it by chanting magic spellz."

      September 1, 2012 at 11:57 am |
  2. Bro

    If you could take 100 creation "scientists" back in time 100,000 years (that number is much bigger than 10,000, for you creationists out there) and proved them incontrovertibly wrong, 90% of them would still believe in creationism (that means 9 out of 10, again, for you creationists out there). So, what's the use in trying to convince them with logic. Never try to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and it annoys the pig.

    September 1, 2012 at 11:50 am |
    • .

      http://www.cgg.org/index.cfm/fuseaction/Library.sr/CT/ARTB/k/1186/Gnosticism-False-Knowledge.htm

      September 1, 2012 at 11:50 am |
    • Creed

      Nine out of ten? Ten out of ten. This is not an argument about evidence.

      September 1, 2012 at 11:57 am |
  3. Halkes

    Believe it or not, December 25th was actually used by very many ancient cultures, predating the ancient Greeks and Romans, as the day of birth of their sun gods. December 21st is the winter solstice, the shortest day of the year, when the sun is at its lowest point in the sky. Then for 3 days, the sun seems still in the sky, neither rising nor falling, until the night of the 24th/morning of the 25th, when the sun begins to rise again. That is why all the creation myths of these ancient cultures say that their sun gods were killed, remained dead for 3 days, then rose again after the 3rd day. For them, this was an annual process that was to be celebrated. The ancient Egyptians used to bring palm trees inside their homes during this time, as it is really an ancient holiday revolving around the harvest and the sun's natural annual cycle. In addition, constellations that appear in the night sky around the sun at the end of December include virgo (the virgin) and crux (ancient Greek for cross), and on the evening of the 24th the 3 stars of Orion's belt (in the eastern sky) line up to point at the horizon, on the exact spot the new sun rises on the 25th. That is why many ancient cultures believed their sun gods were born of a virgin and crucified, among many other consistencies found among them, such as the healing of the blind and walking on water, as well as the 12 disciples they each had (which is also linked to the configuration of the stars around the winter solstice). Also relevant is the fact that the ancient Greek word eon translates to age. Each age was believed to have lasted around 2400 years and was based on the location of the sun relative to the constellations behind it. 0 AD was the first year of the age of Pisces (the fish). The end of the current age is said to occur in the next few hundred years, at which point we will be in the age of aquarius (the water bearer). Supposedly Moses was alive as we were transitioning from the age of Taurus (the calf/bull) to the age of Aries (the ram), thus explaining the story of the golden calf and the subsequent massacre that followed. In closing none of this should really come as a surprise, since we all know that ancient cultures explained the world around them in terms of nature and particularly astronomy. Fortunately, this important part of our history will soon be taught in classrooms around the world.

    September 1, 2012 at 11:49 am |
    • .

      Believe that you are misinformed.

      http://www.cgg.org/index.cfm/fuseaction/Library.sr/CT/ARTB/k/1186/Gnosticism-False-Knowledge.htm

      September 1, 2012 at 11:51 am |
    • Elena

      I believe in a creator and i know that already? what is your point, what does it prove?

      September 1, 2012 at 11:58 am |
    • Halkes

      I tried to read the article in that url, but as I read I could tell it wasn't relevant to the information I posted, so I searched the word "sun" on the page and came up with nothing. There is nothing in that url that refutes the facts I have provided.

      September 1, 2012 at 11:58 am |
    • Halkes

      It proves that Jesus Christ was a) fabricated, and b) just one more in a long line of sun gods, most of whom predate the story of Jesus Christ by thousands of years.

      September 1, 2012 at 12:00 pm |
    • Halkes

      I just remembered the significance of the apostles, they're the 12 signs of the zodiac that surround the sun, traditionally at the center of zodiac imagery.

      September 1, 2012 at 12:12 pm |
  4. nowayhesaidthat

    "No, we are not just evolved animals as Nye believes; we are all made in the image of God."

    And there is no "god", therefore we are created in the image of nothingness.

    September 1, 2012 at 11:48 am |
    • Class of '98

      If the universe is senseless, how does your brain, which is a product of that senseless universe, transcend it to look down upon the universe and call it senseless?

      Atheism is a house of cards because it says the universe is senseless, but somehow their own minds can rise above the senselessness. If your brain is a result of a senseless universe, you cannot trust your own thoughts.

      September 1, 2012 at 11:51 am |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      Define "senseless." I don't think you have a clue as to what many atheists think.

      September 1, 2012 at 11:56 am |
    • sn0wb0arder

      class of 98 – that is a senseless comment. there is no transitive property of intelligence.

      September 1, 2012 at 11:58 am |
    • TruthPrevails :-)

      "Atheism is a house of cards because it says the universe is senseless"

      Atheism doesn't make a claim...it is strictly the disbelief in a god(s)...nothing more.

      September 1, 2012 at 12:02 pm |
    • captain america

      How about keeping your bull sh it beliefs in your own country we got no use for you here. There's your sign

      September 1, 2012 at 12:04 pm |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      captain azzhole, how about pulling your head out of your rectum and finding a new line. You're a dullard.

      September 1, 2012 at 12:05 pm |
  5. G. Zeus Kreiszchte

    Evolution is a myth, of course, which is why we can explain that microorganisms can become resistant to drugs or that they can otherwise independently mutate.....and how we can explain polydactyly in humans (12 fingers and 12 toes). Polydactyl parents can breed and have polydactyl children. What if polydactyls became the prevalent form of modern humankind? What would future historians think of the fossil remains of such 12-digit humans? Would they be considered some "link" to some future offshoot of our primate family that happened to have 12 fingers and toes? What would they think of the older 10-digit predecessors? What about how modern dog breeds are all known to have evolved from wolves? HUH? A chihuahua and a Great Dane all coming from the same parent? IMPOSSIBLE! HA HA HA! Stupid creationists!

    September 1, 2012 at 11:47 am |
  6. Pete Henderson

    The human beings who wrote the Bible were totally ignorant concerning the facts we now know to be true about our universe. They didn't even know that the Earth goes around the sun. All they knew was that there was the world, which they thought was flat, and that there was a moon and sun and stars. Stars were a total mystery to them. It boggles my mind to think that there are people today who are taking the word of these totally ignorant writers over the hard evidence of fossils, carbon dating and every other scientific proof that verifies evolution? Creationism is a fabrication of writers who had no facts whatsoever at their disposal. People who believe in Creationism probably believe in the Tooth Fairy, too.

    September 1, 2012 at 11:47 am |
  7. adrifter

    I know religious people 'feel' deeply in their being that there is a god. However, I also 'feel' deeply in my being that there is not a god. The difference is I have hundreds of years of scientific investigation on my side. Science can disprove many strongly-held religious beliefs. For example, the universe was not created in six days (and don't give me that nonsense that a biblical day was some kind of era or eon), the world is more than 6,000 years old, the sun doesn't revolve around the earth, humans were not created at the beginning of time but evolved much later, etc. etc. Like it or not, religion was created by ancient humans to explain a natural world they could not understand. God is a fiction. I know that and I feel that.

    September 1, 2012 at 11:46 am |
  8. wowforreeelonyoutube

    intelligent design is an attempt to desperately rekindle a largely failed religious belief. you can believe in god all you want but to adapt your stories now, and only now, that science is showing most of your previous stories to be DEAD wrong, is just complete nonsense. stop it. believe in god. but quit trying to rob the natural world of its inherent-ness by cherry picking from science and recklessly feeding it to your ... stories. and no, i don't reject the possibility that god exists and no i'm not atheist.

    September 1, 2012 at 11:45 am |
  9. Eric

    This article inaccurately states "Nye's argument falls in line with the vast majority of scientists, who date the age of the earth and the universe as 4.5 billion years old."

    Earth 4.54 billion
    Universe: 14.6 billion.
    Journalism 101: Fact Check before you publish an article.

    September 1, 2012 at 11:45 am |
    • Bob the Janitor

      I'll just bet you were there, huh?

      September 1, 2012 at 11:56 am |
  10. therealpeace2all

    @oneSTARman

    " a Heisenberg Observer *caused* there to burst forth, etc... "

    I'm not sure where you are going with this ? Are you using "Heisenberg Observer" as a euphemism for a 'creator' / 'god' etc...?

    Is the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle being used now to show that there is/was an 'ultimate observer' that altered the course of reality ?

    Please share a bit more about this "Heisenberg Observer"

    Peace...

    September 1, 2012 at 11:41 am |
    • Elena

      I"ve never heard of the Heisenberg observer but I did heard of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, one can only know location or speed but not both at the same time. The observer idea I know arises from the double slit experiment where particles went from being a particle to a wave and then back again to be a particle as scientist try to observe through which slit the photons were passing through and how an interferance pattern could have formed!. It is also scientist that tell that all particles including the ones that form ours bodies jump in and out of existence at light speeds
      QM also suggest that all we are is just a whole bunch of electromagnetic impulses exchanging information to give rise to an experience of a reality that most likely do not exist either. So! are physicist going wrong with something?

      September 1, 2012 at 11:56 am |
  11. Brandonious

    YEE-HAW!!! Saddle up your T-Rex (jesus pony) for a trip to the creation museum, where you can learn all about how humans and dinosaurs used to live in peace and harmony, just like the Flintstones!!! Seriously, these people are delusional psychopaths, who should be taken away in straight jackets and locked in padded rooms. They are nuts, period.

    September 1, 2012 at 11:41 am |
  12. Shane

    Are Creationists even aware of how other religions view the origin of the earth and human beings?
    Maybe they will stop blaming scientists when they realize that many other religions such as Buddhism have perfectly plausible theories that are in perfect alignment with the theory of evolution

    September 1, 2012 at 11:40 am |
    • Goose66

      I don't think Buddhism is a "religion" in any real sense of the word. It is more of a belief system.

      September 1, 2012 at 11:46 am |
  13. moose

    science has proven man evolved even in a biblical sense we all came from middleast or north africa going with there theory of adam and eve how did people become black white asian or hispanic because climate they lived in stronger genes survived

    September 1, 2012 at 11:40 am |
  14. steve505

    Give it time, Christians. Science is a process, and more questions about evolution will continue to be answered as we study it.

    Christianity has had 2000+ years to plead it's case, and has failed to provide a single shred of real-world evidence regarding any of its big claims.

    Evolution has been studied for only about 160 years, and has already provided a wealth of logical, observable, testable, undeniable evidence to support many of the things we have learned so far.

    Give it time. It is a process. We are in the process of unlocking all of its mysteries. Until then, stop claiming it is unproven and "just a theory". You've had your say for 2000 years, and we are still in the early stages of proving you wrong. Give it time.

    September 1, 2012 at 11:37 am |
    • Darwin

      Where you been man... Science is just now able to explain the first two verses of Genesis. They still have a long way to go.

      September 1, 2012 at 11:39 am |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      Darwin, please shut up. You're an embarrassment.

      September 1, 2012 at 11:43 am |
  15. CNN, please correct

    The article states that scientists believe the age of the earth and the universe is 4.5 billion years. This is correct for earth but the age of the observable universe is estimated to be 13.7 billion years.

    September 1, 2012 at 11:36 am |
    • nicholasad86

      I'm glad I'm not the only one who caught that error.

      September 1, 2012 at 11:45 am |
  16. M.E.

    Who cares how it all got here and when? How's about just going out in the desert and marveling at the stars (note: "Darkness" by The Human League makes a stunningly good soundtrack for it) or playing with a puppy and enjoying the fact that such a silly, fluffy, sweet creature is in the here-and-now with you. Let's stop arguing over how it all got here and just enjoy what we have. Christians; you really think your god want's you to be annoyingly argumentative towards your neighbors? Atheists; why bother arguing with them, you're just wasting your time. Whether you think it evolved or was created, the universe is a pretty cool place to be, so why not just go out and enjoy it instead of wasting time arguing over it?

    September 1, 2012 at 11:35 am |
    • putty

      The problem is, allowing people to believe what they want to believe impedes progress. It's like saying, okay, we'll let people believe that witches are responsible for disease. What does it matter? If someone wants to believe the earth is flat, let them. Planes work on magic? Fine. The people that believe these things are powerful as voters and consumers. Increasing numbers of anti-science folk are voted into powerful positions. This impacts what is on the education curriculum, impacting the number of future American scientists. It also impacts funding for science, which relies heavily on tax dollars. This then slows down the rate of biomedical research, which is already moving abroad due to stalled prgress in this country.

      September 1, 2012 at 11:41 am |
    • nickyNewport

      the "why and how"is what makes life worth while and the root of humanity. to question the importance of "why and how" is well and good for YOU as you cuddle with puppies beneath the stars (which is awesome in its own right) however i consider "why and how" to be above all things of importance and its that belief that drives human progress. To just put your head in a hole and say "i dont care how or why" gives people on the surface an unfair advantage in influencing you and your children's beliefs and intellect.

      September 1, 2012 at 11:52 am |
  17. hikertom

    The Bible isn't the only source of creation mythology. All religions have creation myths, including hundreds of American Indian tribes. Should they all be taught in school?

    Biology teachers are qualified to teach biology, not mythology.

    Why do some people think it is degrading that we are descended from other animals, but it is ok that we are made from mud?

    September 1, 2012 at 11:35 am |
  18. pugh7755

    Here is another interesting fact, that "science" proves. Intelligent man creates logical information, while nature creates chaotic patterns. Our, and all living things, DNA is a string of "logical information" that gives our body instructions on how to grow, how we are supposed to look, etc. Our DNA is the only organic information found in the universe. Now, since only intelligent man creates information and our DNA is information, then we can only be created from God and not from random chaotic patterns. Just as the Bible says, we are created in God's image. Well, I would rather be created in the image of a God rather than slimy primordial soup as science would have us believe. Talk about dumbing us down. But, all you atheists and evolutionists keep believing you come from non-intelligent primordial soup, that way you have an excuse for your ignorance.

    September 1, 2012 at 11:34 am |
    • What?

      What in the world are you talking about? Man CREATES logical information? Nature creates chaotic patterns? Our DNA is the only logical information in the universe? Here's some logical information for you. It rained yesterday. The ground got wet. Do you even know what information is?

      September 1, 2012 at 11:42 am |
    • MamaMagee

      also interesting to note that our genetic code is closer to that of pigs than primates. It's called the "THEORY"of evolution for a reason. There is no actual proof that we descended from apes. And I don't personally believe that the earth and everything in it was created in 6 days. I know what the Bible says – and the Bible wasn't written by God; it was written by mortal men.

      September 1, 2012 at 11:46 am |
    • putty

      Oh man, if you knew anythign about DNA, you would NOT be talking about how logical it was. DNA is MESSY. A majority of it is junk left over from the scars of evolution (previous iterations of it). These scars are useful for dating when one group split off from another group, though. Some of it is cancer causing (viral DNA or transposons that can be reactivated to jump into another location). 3% of our DNA is derived from these parasites jumping into our genome.

      September 1, 2012 at 11:47 am |
    • putty

      Mama McGee, our genome is NOT closer to pigs than other primates. Humans are designated as primates, with other primates designated as "nonhuman primates" in scientific literature. Maybe you're confusing the fact that pig hearts are close to human sized that they were used for transplants?

      September 1, 2012 at 11:49 am |
    • Will Draven

      "Our DNA is the only organic information found in the universe."

      You obviously have no idea how large the universe is, how little of it we have had the chance to examine, or what the word "information" means.

      September 1, 2012 at 11:51 am |
    • eqgold

      You've been reading creation websites haven't you? Tsk tsk. You should have stayed in school...

      September 1, 2012 at 7:33 pm |
  19. Podcast

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-ZrZtiG9iI&feature=player_detailpage

    September 1, 2012 at 11:34 am |
    • Blessed are the Cheesemakers

      Wow that was terrible, the ignorance is awful, evolution is not random, it is selected....naturally. That's why they call it natural selection.

      September 1, 2012 at 11:45 am |
    • sn0wb0arder

      that is hilariously bad.

      September 1, 2012 at 12:02 pm |
  20. oneSTARman

    IN THE BEGINNING – from a Nothingness Devoid of even empty SPACE .. a SEA of Virtual Quantum Probability .. a Heisenberg Observer caused there to burst forth an EXPLOSION of BEING. And the BEING divided into DARKNESS and LIGHT and the the Darkness was a Fractalized Matrix of Black Holes around which the Light coalesced into GALAXIES and the Evening and the Morning were the first Day.

    September 1, 2012 at 11:33 am |
    • therealpeace2all

      @oneSTARman

      You Said: " a Heisenberg Observer *caused* there to burst forth, etc... etc... "

      I'm not sure where you are going with this ? Are you using "Heisenberg Observer" as a euphemism for a 'creator' / 'god' etc...?

      Are you using the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle now to show that there is/was an 'ultimate observer' that altered the course of reality ?

      Please share a bit more about this "Heisenberg Observer"

      Peace...

      September 1, 2012 at 11:43 am |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.