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Conventions leave atheists asking: What political party represents me?
A voice vote to change the DNC party platform turned to chaos Wednesday night.
September 6th, 2012
03:24 PM ET

Conventions leave atheists asking: What political party represents me?

By Dan Merica, CNN

Washington (CNN) – This convention season has not been good for atheists.

The word "God" was reinserted in the Democratic platform after it had been removed. A plan to raise atheist billboards in the convention cities was stymied by opponents. And though there were preachers and rabbis and other religious leaders opening and closing each day of each convention, there wasn’t an avowed atheist talking up unbelief on either convention’s speaking list.

The political lockout has left many nonbelievers asking, “What political party represents me?”

“We are deeply saddened by the exclusion of a large number of Americans by both parties,” said Teresa MacBain, a spokeswoman for the group American Atheists, in an interview on Thursday. “It amazes me that in modern-day America, so much prejudice still exists.”

After word spread Wednesday that Democrats left God out of their platform, atheists rejoiced. “Truly amazing news,” wrote Loren Miller on Atheist Nexus, a popular atheist blog. “The Republicans remain in the firm grasp of right-wing Christian religiosity, and I really don't know what it's going to take to free them from it.”

But the convention committee immediately received huge pressure get God back in the platform. Even President Obama, according to CNN reporting, said, “Why on earth would that have been taken out?” when he first heard of the omission.

In an awkward session that required three voice votes on the convention floor, the Democrats opted to add “God” back to the platform.

For atheists, the Democrats were seen to be taking away a hard-fought victory. “We had 24 hours of joy as we felt (that) finally our government values all people,” said MacBain. “But that was short-lived. The vote last night angered many atheists and left them feeling excluded once again.”

Online, atheist websites and Facebook pages went from upbeat to downcast as news spread of the platform revision.

“Obama was the first president to acknowledge non believers,” Mark Musante wrote on the American Atheists’ Facebook page. “I wish he would stick to his guns.”

Musante was referring to Obama’s 2009 inauguration speech, when the president said, “We are a nation of Christians and Muslims, Jews and Hindus, and nonbelievers.”

Beverly Sitherwood, on the Friendly Atheist blog Facebook page, accused the Democrats of “Pandering for power.”

Some atheist leaders used the platform defeat as a rallying call.

“I guess a tiny step was too much to ask for,” David Silverman, president of the American Atheists, told CNN. “This was a clear message to the 16% of the voting population - we don’t count. Well, guess what, Dems - we do. And we vote.”

Silverman says that 16% of the voting public identify as nonbelievers. According to the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life, 12% of the electorate in 2008 was made up of people with no religious affiliation, though experts say the number of avowed atheists is much smaller.

While acknowledging atheists, Obama has given platforms to high-profile religious leaders, including Rick Warren, a megachurch pastor who prayed at his inauguration, and Catholic Cardinal Timothy Dolan, who is giving the final prayer of the convention on Thursday night.

American Atheists’ plans to raise billboards ridiculing the presidential candidates’ faith ended in failure. After the group put up billboards in Charlotte, North Carolina, the site of the Democratic National Convention, last month, it quickly removed them due to “physical threats to not only our staff, but the billboard company as well.”

American Atheists had also planned on a billboard in Tampa, Florida, to coincide with the Republican National Convention there. But American Atheists said that all the billboard companies in Tampa rejected a sign taking aim at GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s Mormon faith.

Perhaps because of the Republican Party’s ties to conservative Christianity, atheists tend to be Democrats. According to a 2012 Pew study, 71% of Americans who identified as atheist were Democrats.

“The Republicans who spoke at the RNC seemed more like televangelists than politicians,” MacBain said. “The message was clear from the RNC: Get God, or get out.”

The Republican’s 2012 platform mentions God 12 times, many of which describe the “God-given” rights that the Republican Party says are inherent to the American idea.

Though most atheist groups claim that there are closeted atheists serving as representatives and senators, only one has come out as such.

In September 2007, Rep. Pete Stark, Democrat of California, affirmed his atheism in a speech at the Humanist Chaplaincy at Harvard University.

- Dan Merica

Filed under: 2012 Election • Atheism • God • Politics

soundoff (3,922 Responses)
  1. Socrates

    Atheists need to find God. maybe a trip to Jerusalem, the new capital of the sacred state of Israel will help their souls. God (I have no idea what is that) will help the atheists to find peace for their souls if they have faith in God (Which one, there are so many) they will find the truth. Religion is what they need, it is fun. If you believe in God you will go to paradise when you died or you can apply to own 72 virgins. There are lot of prizes for religious people.

    September 7, 2012 at 11:10 am |
    • Huebert

      I found god. He had fallen in between the couch cushions.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:13 am |
    • Amniculi

      You would think that an omniscient God would never need to be found. He should always know where he is.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:14 am |
    • James PDX

      Which god will reward me at death with godhood of my own on a new planet of paradise? You say it's the Christian/Jewish/Muslim god, but I only get that reward if I joing the Mormon sect? So much for that. No way I'm giving up caffeine while I'm a working stiff. Plus, I like to go commando, even if the underwear are magical.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:17 am |
  2. david o

    God is the universe the multiverse and the string. He makes the laws of physics and the god particles (if such things exist) He makes the joys and the sufferings. To deny god is to deny ourselves.

    September 7, 2012 at 11:09 am |
    • Anon

      Which "god" exactly? The abrahamic god of the three desert blood cults or some imagined made up one?

      September 7, 2012 at 11:11 am |
    • sybaris

      and yet David, you have zero evidence to support your claim

      September 7, 2012 at 11:14 am |
    • david o

      There is only one god, but many interpretations of his will.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:14 am |
    • david o

      My evidence is the wonderful world around us.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:15 am |
    • Chikkipop

      So a god is whatever you say a god is?

      And just how do you know this?

      September 7, 2012 at 11:17 am |
    • James PDX

      Why would god make the sufferings? Is he a jerk?

      September 7, 2012 at 11:18 am |
    • Anon

      I assume david o is only talking about Yahweh/Jesus/Jehovah like they always do.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:23 am |
    • david o

      God is the creator I cannot say who he is he can only say who I am. I believe suffering to be the result of sin.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:24 am |
    • James PDX

      Sure, but God created sin, so shouldn't he shoulder the blame a bit? Sin seems like a very imperfect creation.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:27 am |
    • david o

      Why does it matter what you call him/her.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:27 am |
    • david o

      Imperfect to who. We are gods children is there any other way ultimately to learn a leason other than suffering.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:30 am |
  3. MsRep

    Why is anyone whinning... WE ALL have freedom to worship or not worship in this country. What we need to stop doing is expecting others to believe the way we beleive. It's foolish pride on all sides that says... Not Fair, Im not being represented. Get over it...EVERYONE HAS THE RIGHT TO BELIEVE OR NOT. Why can't we just agree to disagree and move one. Geesh!

    September 7, 2012 at 11:09 am |
    • James PDX

      The real problem is when religious groups get into politics and try to force their religious morals into law so that I am forcefully subjected to their religion through my government. I don't call it whining to want an end to that.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:20 am |
  4. the_dude

    I'm sorry.....did someone give the impression that anyone cares what an atheist thinks?

    September 7, 2012 at 11:09 am |
    • pastmorm

      the_, by posting your statement, you did indeed show that you care what an Atheist thinks.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:10 am |
    • James PDX

      the_dude just owned himself. Assist to postmorn.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:21 am |
    • sam

      I have a feeling the_dude pwned himself just getting up this morning.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:23 am |
  5. Ernie

    Athiets want religous people to conform to them...they are hippocrites plain and simple. Just like most religions have done in the past modern Athiets use thug tactics to get people to conform to their way of thinking. Hateful people, I don't care for them.

    September 7, 2012 at 11:07 am |
    • Drappelfed

      Could not agree more...but I also wanted to say who cares if they don't know who represents them, they are the BIGGEST hypocrits when it comes to religion/anti-religion-follow your beliefs don't try a pursuade others to do the same!!

      September 7, 2012 at 11:10 am |
    • sam

      $10 says Ernie's never met one, and has some basic view of life based on Fox news propaganda.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:10 am |
    • Huebert

      How is pointing out the logical inconsistencies and out right falsehoods in your religion a "thug tactic"? It seems to me far more like a debate tactic.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:11 am |
    • Ernie

      @twoterds I am not religous – you assume because I have a different point of view that I am...this is another one of the flawed thinking precesses you people have. If you are not athiest and you are not religous blows your mind. Athiesm is a lack of belief in dieties and religion is the strict following of a set of rules and customs surrounding a diety....I am neither...I have met plenty of Athiests don't assume because you don't make your own opinions I don not as well.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:15 am |
    • sybaris

      Uh no Ernie, we don't want you to "conform" to atheism because at one time you yourself were an atheist.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:16 am |
    • sam

      Then Ernie, you're doing a crap job of making yourself clear. I thought atheists were hateful...?

      September 7, 2012 at 11:16 am |
  6. Bob

    "there wasn’t an avowed atheist talking up unbelief on either convention’s speaking list."

    Wouldn't someone preaching unbelief be turning that 'unbelief' into a form of 'belief' thus making it a religion unto itself?

    September 7, 2012 at 11:07 am |
    • sybaris

      right, just like not collecting stamps is a hobby

      September 7, 2012 at 11:17 am |
    • Chikkipop

      Here is what an atheist would talk about:

      - respect for reason and evidence,
      - the importance of critical thinking
      - the problems with belief based upon wishful thinking
      - support for science understanding
      - the virtue of intellectual honesty – concern for what is most probably true rather than what is comforting
      - the positive value of questioning authority & popular but unsupported beliefs

      These issues apply to individuals and the country as a whole; understanding them is key.to being the best we can be.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:36 am |
  7. mklsgl

    So, when are the Ancient Alien Theorists (Giorgio Tsouklos, et al) going to start protesting their exclusion?

    September 7, 2012 at 11:06 am |
  8. Orso

    I am an atheist, and I do not feel left out. I respect other's beliefs, as silly as they may be. I do not expect to have a presidential candidate or political party endorse atheism at least for another two decades. You see, I am atheist, not delusional. I am voting for the candidate that will make America a better place to live, regardless of his/her religious beliefs (or lack of), after all, we have a separation of government and church... well, we are supposed to anyway.

    September 7, 2012 at 11:05 am |
    • Ernie

      Seperation of church and state means that the Church does not make decisions for the state. Not that some person, who is religous, cannot make a decision for the state. This is where you athiests are all f'd up you don't know the actual meaning of seperation of church and state.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:11 am |
    • Ron, St. George, UT

      well said - my feelings exactly!

      September 7, 2012 at 11:11 am |
    • Ron, St. George, UT

      Well said ORSO - my feelings exactly!

      September 7, 2012 at 11:13 am |
    • sam

      Orso, that's the way it's supposed to be – who's going to get the job done, not what they believe.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:15 am |
  9. Prestinhalf

    ". . .there wasn’t an avowed atheist talking up unbelief on either convention’s speaking list." What discussion could there possibly be about unbelief? I am an avowed unbeliever of their unbelief. Would there just be a moment of silence whilst said atheist speaker doesn't have anything to say? Where's my place in the platform?

    September 7, 2012 at 11:05 am |
    • ryoni

      Maybe they could have spoken about anything in the real world, you know, that realm we're living in; as opposed to imaginary worlds. Just because religious folks have these convoluted made-up stories to bore us with, doesn't mean there's nothing else to talk about.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:12 am |
    • X-Factor

      Exactly....what platform does an atheist have. They are there and we acknowledge that, but what substance can they bring to life's toughest issues.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:21 am |
    • PraiseTheLard

      x-factor asks "what substance can they bring to life's toughest issues." How about Logic, for starters?

      September 7, 2012 at 12:57 pm |
  10. bs1

    From what I've seen, even in a "bible belt" state, it appears that athiests are a lot closer to 30% of the population. Athiests also do not "tend to be democrats" by any strech of the imagination, sane, rational athiests tend to be independent since they do not fall for the lies and failed platforms of the left or right wings.

    September 7, 2012 at 11:03 am |
  11. pastmorm

    Ah, the next civil war...christains against atheists...and we can all say it started here, on CNN. Sigh.

    September 7, 2012 at 11:02 am |
    • X-Factor

      No Sir, there will be no war between Christians and atheist. Make no mistake the atheists fight is against God not man.

      Peace................

      September 7, 2012 at 11:35 am |
  12. @GuileOfTheGods

    I love how everyone on here, including the author, that is NOT atheist are telling all the "non believers" how they feel. How about if you want to know how atheists feel, you ask the atheists, not ask the Christians who tell atheists how they should feel. Because I'm pretty sure thats why they don't like your religion in the first place, because you try to tell them how to act, think & feel.

    September 7, 2012 at 11:01 am |
  13. TexDoc

    I'm sure there are small government, individualists, who are aethists who vote republican. I'm sure there are aethists who are progressives, who see government as a solution, not a problem, who vote democrat. Why does either party have to include or forego God to include all people.

    September 7, 2012 at 11:00 am |
  14. Meh

    No party represents anyone but themselves – get over it – they're all pathetic and should be brought up on charges of assisting the downfall of this country. They wont let me say the word that sounds like tree-son

    September 7, 2012 at 11:00 am |
    • sam

      Treason?

      September 7, 2012 at 11:21 am |
    • Meh

      Every time I type that word, my entry gets rejected but thanks for putting it out there

      September 7, 2012 at 11:30 am |
  15. MagicPanties

    Atheists are not necessarily communists, just as christians are not necessarily republicans.

    Atheism is quite simply a "lack" of belief in a god and has nothing to do with politics.
    It is the believers that make it political.

    September 7, 2012 at 10:59 am |
    • ripariumguy

      Religion has everything to do with politics! That is where one's foundation (or lack there of) of morals and beliefs of the right are placated. If you take a Christian society, and a atheistic society, which one do you think will operate better? You'll say the atheistic one, of course, only because atheists have no concept of right or wrong, other then the law and human nature both of which are based in/on Christian principals.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:05 am |
    • Anon

      Take your christian principals and ram them up your ass.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:07 am |
    • BRC

      @Ripariumguy, just to see if you actually thought about what you wrote.

      You say that law and human nature both come from Christianity ("the law and human nature both of which are based in/on Christian principals"). I find that a bit difficult to believe, since you know, it's wrong. Here's a timeline-

      1st People exist (ergo, humna nature exists)
      2nd People form societies, these societies have laws.
      3rd Christianity is created.

      Yeah, actually it looks like Christian principles came last, and were probably based on the other two elements. Glad we could work that out. Let me know if you have any questions.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:14 am |
    • ripariumguy

      Hahaha! Why thank you Anon for adding to this conversation.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:14 am |
    • therealpeace2all

      @ripariumguy

      Well, looks like @BRC beat me to it. He's right actually, IMO.

      Peace...

      September 7, 2012 at 11:16 am |
    • sam

      ripariumguy, you're full of it. Morals were around long before christians. They are not the folks to look to for a good example. Nice try, though.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:18 am |
    • sybaris

      ripariumguy, by your christo-myopic logic everywhere on earth except where christians live should be in chaos.
      That is simply not the case.

      Stop the ignorance, put down the religion.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:20 am |
    • ripariumguy

      BRC: If you believe that Christian principals are man made, your argument it valid and true. However, have you ever wondered why people feel a twinge of the heart (aka, a feeling that something is wrong, compassion for fellow man, etc) when they see war, death, a woman being beaten, etc? That "twinge" is the human nature I was referring to, and was given to us by God during creation (Cain and Abel come to mind as one of the first reactions of this sort to the fall).

      So, in short, a revised timeline:
      1st God creates man with this human nature
      2nd Societies follow God's orders (or principles) via prophets
      3rd God gives man law
      4th Societies form utilizing the laws (ie, American society).

      September 7, 2012 at 11:49 am |
    • ripariumguy

      Sybaris: Not chaos, just filled with evil. You can have chaos without evil, and vice-versa.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:51 am |
    • therealpeace2all

      @ripariumguy

      Hmmm... I see so, your premise, to be true, is based on the Christian biblical genesis ?

      In other words.... Goddidit. Got it. 😯

      Peace...

      September 7, 2012 at 12:00 pm |
    • ripariumguy

      Therealpeace: Yep, pretty much. He's done a crap load you know. I'm not really sure how else to approach debating Christian morals and how they are concerned with politics without bringing up the Bible and God. Sorry.

      September 7, 2012 at 12:12 pm |
    • BRC

      @ripariumguy,
      I understand how you came to your conclusions given your timelien, the problem is that we know your timeline to be false. Not in that, I know a god din't cause the first life to begin, but we know that there are civilizations and poeple's older than the Christian Bible, and older then Genesis would account for. It follows that the "God" based timeline is wrong.

      As for that twinge in your heart "actually your brain", that can be explained by tens of thousands of years and a few thousand generations of human evolution where success of the species was determined by our ability to coexit and work together. Evidence to support this, can be found in people who suffer from mental conditions (ie. sociopaths) who DO NOT feel this instinct. In my example, it is quite simple that a certain number of individuals in a species will have defects/altered traits that vary from the norm, and since being a sociopath is not really conducive to wide spread propegation in society built on teamwork, it would explain why they are rare-ish in occurance. IF, as you claim, the twinge is a gift from "God"; why are their people that don't have it? Did "God" miss one?

      September 7, 2012 at 1:38 pm |
  16. Lauren

    If you don't believe in God, then that is your right. But we live in a country where our money says "In God We Trust" and "God Bless America" could be seen as one of our national songs for as much as it is played. Atheists need to accept that they are in the minority and therefore, we can't be deleting all faith references simply because a small group chooses not to believe.

    September 7, 2012 at 10:59 am |
    • pastmorm

      Lauren, you need to learn some historical facts. "In god we trust" wasn't put on our money until the 50's during the McCarthy propaganda years. Our country was not built by relgious freaks, it was put together for RELIGOUS FREEDOM...to choose our own paths of belief without someone telling us we were wrong...

      September 7, 2012 at 11:01 am |
    • MagicPanties

      "god" went on the money in the 50's at the height of the communist hysteria, it was not part of the founding fathers vision, which expressly states "separation" of church and state.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:02 am |
    • @GuileOfTheGods

      Actually... if you look at the last census, people who don't affiliate with any religion are actually THE MAJORITY in this country.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:03 am |
    • sam

      Ladies and gentlemen, I present Lauren, the average American voter, who knows jack-all about the history of the country she lives in. Terrific.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:05 am |
    • BRC

      With pastmorm on this one.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:06 am |
    • Lauren

      I understand when "God" was placed on our money. There were still plenty of references to God from the founding fathers. Our country was not founded on the principle that we should be free FROM religion altogether – it was founded on the principle of religious FREEDOM, meaning that people are free to believe in whatever religion they like, or nothing at all.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:06 am |
    • @GuileOfTheGods

      But Sam, it's what Lauren BELIEVES! Facts and reality don't matter when you have FAITH and you BELIEVE in something, which is why Lauren will go to heaven and the rest of us will be tortured in hell. Which really sucks because heaven just got old school arcade versions of Moral Kombat AND NBA JAM... Jealous!

      September 7, 2012 at 11:07 am |
    • Amniculi

      Indeed, you all need to review your history. "In God We Trust" was added to American currency after the Civil War. "Under God" was added to the Pledge of Allegience during the 50's. Neither belong there.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:08 am |
    • pastmorm

      And yet, Lauren, you are flip flopping like your republican candidate is...you started out telling Atheists how they must believe and now you're advocating the freedom of relgion and choice? Geesh.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:09 am |
    • Lauren

      The fact that I believe in God doesn't meant that I don't understand American History – given my educational background and success thus far in life, I probably have more intelligence in my pinkie finger than most people have in their entire bodies. But I digress...atheists are still the minority in this country. Christians may not be majority anymore (I am honestly not sure), but most people associate themselves with some religion OR have some belief in a higher power. Atheists are certainly growing into a larger sector of the populace, but they are certainly not the majority.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:10 am |
    • ripariumguy

      Uh, atheists are the majority, huh? http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2012/tables/12s0075.pdf

      September 7, 2012 at 11:11 am |
    • Lauren

      I never said atheists need to believe in anything – I said that atheists need to accept that they live in a country where most people believe in some sort of a god. Reading comprehension, please.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:11 am |
    • sam

      >>given my educational background and success thus far in life, I probably have more intelligence in my pinkie finger than most people have in their entire bodies.<<

      Gosh, Lauren, you're so awesome!! Tell us your GPA too because it's a super awesome way to prove you're awesome!!

      LOL The tactics of a grade-A tool. Congrats.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:12 am |
    • pastmorm

      Got is Lauren, your very statement of superiority indicates a personality disorder. With a background in psychology, I have learned long ago not to argue with your kind. You thrive on splitting people. Good luck with that and your superior intelligence!!!

      September 7, 2012 at 11:13 am |
    • pastmorm

      I meant "Got it Lauren"

      September 7, 2012 at 11:14 am |
    • @GuileOfTheGods

      Atheists are NOT THE MAJORITY. But in the last, census, more people identified as not affiliating with religion, than people who identified as a specific religion. Not non religion against religion, but non religious against Christians, non religious against Jews, non religious against Muslims. Non religious affiliate is the majority compared to other identifying religions.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:19 am |
    • sam

      You guys, we can't argue any further. Lauren has credentials, and is smarter than most of us. We just need to accept that.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:20 am |
    • ryoni

      Faith references don't belong in the public forum. Our republic is one of inclusion; it's not as simple as 'majority wins'. And any atheist that grew up here is pretty familiar with the plethora of god references on money, songs, etc. But change doesn't occur if nobody speaks up.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:22 am |
    • Lauren

      I made an extremely rational comment that wasn't hateful and that wasn't spouting off any kind of religious dogma. Yet, I have a group of people who feel they need to defend themselves against that comment using nothing but irrational "logic" and borderline hateful remarks. I don't care if you are atheists or not, you all just seem like bad people. Learn to have a normal discussion.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:23 am |
    • Amniculi

      Lauren, this is the internet. Internet, Lauren.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:26 am |
    • sam

      You comment was based on the fact that since God is on the money, then, well, believers are the majority. That's not rational. Then you followed it up by claiming you're smarter than most. You really are not making a good impression, and yes, people will have problems with that. It doesn't make anyone a 'bad person' any more than it makes you a snotty, misguided bitch.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:37 am |
    • sybaris

      Lauren that's like saying "Since willful ignorance is the majority we will not bow down to logic and reason"

      September 7, 2012 at 11:45 am |
    • PraiseTheLard

      Actually, this is the time to quote Stephen Roberts "I contend that we are both atheists. I just believe in one fewer god than you do. When you understand why you dismiss all the other possible gods, you will understand why I dismiss yours.” So... yes, Atheists do form the majority in this country...

      September 7, 2012 at 1:05 pm |
  17. NorthVanCan

    I dream of the day when children will be free to learn about their wold with out religious dogma being rammed down their throats.

    September 7, 2012 at 10:57 am |
    • PraiseTheLard

      Keep dreaming... the forces of ignorance are too powerful and too appealing... who doesn't want a great big Teddy-Bear in the sky?

      September 7, 2012 at 1:06 pm |
  18. reality check

    You too are an atheist, I only believe in one less god than you. You did reject up Zeus, Thor etc

    September 7, 2012 at 10:56 am |
    • mustafa

      lol okay dick dawkins...

      September 7, 2012 at 11:45 am |
  19. Kyle

    I personally am an atheist, but I couldn't care less about the president's personal religious beliefs as long as they don't let their beliefs affect their policy. I would have no problem voting for a candidate who identifies as Christian if they shared the same political views as me, and I wouldn't vote for an atheist who I don't see eye-to-eye with. What you do during your own personal free time is not my business, and I expect you to extend to me the same courtesy, but it's when you come out and say that God is an integral part of your policy that I take issue.

    September 7, 2012 at 10:56 am |
    • OldeWhyteMann

      I agree 100%. When people with the power to legislate laws that affect me say they are using GOD to guide them I want to ask them "Whose GOD?".

      September 7, 2012 at 11:07 am |
  20. Whatwhat

    What are they (atheist) whinning about? Isn't it enough democrats boo'd the very mention of the word God at their DNC? I think it is pretty clear the democrat party IS the party for atheist.

    September 7, 2012 at 10:54 am |
    • pastmorm

      Why are you christians so hateful? Do you think you're convincing people that you're good? Do you think that maybe FORCING your children to become religious freaks like yourself MIGHT be the reason they are becoming Atheists????

      September 7, 2012 at 10:57 am |
    • Lauren

      pastmorm – there was nothing hateful in his comment. Stop overreacting.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:00 am |
    • @GuileOfTheGods

      Atheists arent actually whining, the author of the article is telling us that atheists should be whining, but the only whiners are the Christians complaining that the atheists are complaining. Like with religion, maybe Christians should just worry about themselves.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:05 am |
    • pastmorm

      Lauren, kiss Jesus's _ _ _! Don't tell me how to act. Move to Chiina with your communist beliefs!

      September 7, 2012 at 11:06 am |
    • freddysaces

      wow so believing in something different than you makes one a freak and communist – good fourth grade tactic. Way to make your case.

      September 7, 2012 at 11:09 am |
    • freddysaces

      though coming from me...I am only in 4th grade now...I have to admit I'm silly. I like dressing up like a clown! Lauren is a communist...mommy told me not to tell people what to do!

      September 7, 2012 at 11:18 am |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.