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September 11th, 2012
05:49 AM ET

Belief Blog's Morning Speed Read for Tuesday, September 11

By Arielle Hawkins, CNN

Here's the Belief Blog’s morning rundown of the top faith-angle stories from around the United States and around the world. Click the headlines for the full stories.

From the Blog:

CNN: Atheists continue battle against World Trade Center cross at memorial
Eleven years after the World Trade Center attack, the billion dollar memorial and museum dedicated to the victims of 9/11 is just half that – a memorial without an operating museum. And though a dispute between New York City’s mayor and New York’s governor is responsible for delaying the opening, a separate legal battle is aimed at blocking one museum exhibit in particular: a large cross made of one of the twin tower’s T-beams that became a national symbol in the days after the 2001 attacks.

Tweet of the Day:

[tweet https://twitter.com/MuslimIQ/status/245400391074856960%5D

Belief on TV:

Enlightening Reads:

New York Times: Six Days After 9/11, Another Anniversary Worth Honoring
In the coming days, the calendar will bring the anniversaries of two signal events. One, of course, is Sept. 11, a Tuesday this year, as it was in 2001, when Al Qaeda terrorists in four hijacked planes killed more than 3,000 Americans. With public memorial services and private tears, those deaths will be recalled and mourned.

Religion News Service: Concerts and controversial opera bring faiths together in St. Louis
Two years after the Sept. 11 attacks, Timothy O'Leary sat in an audience of 2,000 New Yorkers listening to the Brooklyn Philharmonic perform a concert about terrorism — the 1985 murder of an American tourist by members of the Palestine Liberation Front on a Mediterranean cruise ship. It was one of the most powerful moments he'd ever had in a theater. Terrorism stories are rarely happy stories, and yet the path O'Leary has taken — from bringing the controversial opera "The Death of Klinghoffer" to St. Louis last year to a Sept. 11 memorial concert Sunday (Sept. 9) — ends with a hopeful, permanent pairing of faith and the arts in St. Louis.

Christian Post: Andy Stanley: Your Approach to Preaching Can Hinder Your Message
Andy Stanley spoke to pastors and teachers at the NewSpring Leadership Conference (NLC) last Thursday about the "one question" he is asked all the time: How do you preach to unbelievers and Christians at the same time during church services?
"It's really your approach, and not your content, that determines how well that you engage unchurched people," said Stanley.

Religion News Service: Evangelicals seek a future for thousands of frozen embryos
The embryo was frozen in liquid nitrogen when Gabriel and Callie Fluhrer found it. They didn’t know whether that embryo would grow to be a boy or a girl, or whether it would even grow at all. But to the Fluhrers, it was worth the risk. That tiny collection of cells was a baby, they believed. And if they didn’t pluck it from the warehouse where it had been stored since its biological parents decided they didn’t need or want it any longer, it was likely to die. “If we’re going to stand against abortion, it’s not simply picketing a clinic,” said Gabriel Fluhrer, a public relations and publishing coordinator for the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals. “It’s doing the hard work of adopting the orphans around the world, whether embryos or orphans living in China.”

The Telegraph: Thought for the Day will not be opened to atheists, says BBC religion chief
Aaqil Ahmed disclosed he has reviewed Radio Four’s 'God slot’ in response to complaints that it was “too religious”. However, the daily homily on the Today programme is intended to provide a “religious” perspective on the news and should not be opened up to people of no faith, Mr Ahmed has concluded.

Opinion of the Day:

CNN: My Take: The Mother Teresa you don’t know
David Van Biema, the chief religion writer at Time Magazine for ten years, is author of the illustrated biography Mother Teresa: The Life and Works of a Modern Saint, now being reissued and made available in Spanish as La Madre Teresa: La Vida y las obras de una santa moderna. Van Biema offers a “quick Blessed Mother Teresa primer, emphasizing the stuff that you probably don’t know, some of which we only learned recently.”

Join the conversation…

CNN: From Kurt Warner’s wife to ‘Christian famous’
Brenda Warner used to known for her unflinchingly defense and championing of her superstar husband KurtWarner, former quarterback for the St. Louis Rams and Arizona Cardinals and two-time National Football League MVP. In the two years since Kurt’s retirement, Brenda has become what some call "Christian famous" – a renowned evangelical speaker who tours the country with the likes of the 2012 Women of Faith tour, which will reach tens of thousands of Christian women with a message of hope and faith.

- A. Hawkins

Filed under: Uncategorized

soundoff (22 Responses)
  1. Atheism is Great for Kids and Grown-Ups Too!

    It's really best for all people including children to have an agnostic approach to god, and an atheistic approach to all religion. It keeps things simple for kids, and let's them be all that they can be. They just need to be taught that some things, like all religion, were just made up by salesmen and politicians from long ago; and that other things, like god, we really don't know a damn thing about.

    Atheists have strong minds and don't need a religion. Sometimes, religious folk run and hide their misdeeds within their religion (and by doing so, they disserve society).

    So instead of praying to make-believe people, get a good cup of tea and go on and sit down and collect your damn thoughts. My goodness.

    mama kindless

    September 12, 2012 at 8:26 am |
  2. Atheism is not healthy for children and other living things

    Prayer changes things
    Proven

    September 12, 2012 at 4:41 am |
    • hal 9000

      I'm sorry "Atheism is not healthy for children and other living things", but you assertions regarding atheism and prayer are unfounded. I see that you repeat these unfounded statements with high frequency. Perhaps the following book might help you overcome this problem:

      I'm Told I Have Dementia: What You Can Do... Who You Can Turn to...
      by the Alzheimer's Disease Society

      September 12, 2012 at 8:28 am |
  3. Iqbal Khan

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nHQGth-0ZzQ&list=LP1qO__o170Lw&index=6&feature=plcp

    September 11, 2012 at 10:07 pm |
  4. Iqbal Khan

    Who was behind?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mx8IJoRL6cE&feature=related

    September 11, 2012 at 9:54 pm |
  5. Atheism is not healthy for children and other living things

    Prayer changes things

    September 11, 2012 at 7:39 pm |
    • hal 9000

      I'm sorry "Atheism is not healthy for children and other living things", but you assertions regarding atheism and prayer are unfounded. I see that you repeat these unfounded statements with high frequency. Perhaps the following book might help you overcome this problem:

      I'm Told I Have Dementia: What You Can Do... Who You Can Turn to...
      by the Alzheimer's Disease Society

      September 11, 2012 at 9:14 pm |
  6. BRC

    Posted this question yesterday but never got a real response, so let's try again. Open question to believers: If real undeniable proof that a religion OTHER than yours is right is found (or divinely imparted on all of humanity), what would you do? WOuld you convert? Would you recognize that your religion was wrong, but refuse to accept the other? OR would you continue your faith unchanged?

    As an athiest, if there was ever PROOF that one of the world's religions was right, and it was one that believed in gods, I would stop being an athiest. I wouldn't convert to that religion, and I wouldn't change the way I live my life, but I would definitely admit I was wrong.

    September 11, 2012 at 9:28 am |
    • William Demuth

      I suppose the devil is in the details, but at the end of the day I suspect I wouldn't change all that much (I don't believe in anything)

      If I became aware of a "creator", I suppose I would offer them some respect (as I child to a parent) but I certainly wouldn't offer any form of worship. (I do not expect worship from my children, and would not offer any!)

      In fact if this "God' required it, I suspect I would conspire to kill it as a manifestation of my militant self-determinisim.

      If one kills God, is he then not the new God?

      September 11, 2012 at 12:15 pm |
    • Robert Brown

      There is only one God, so any "proof" otherwise would just be a trick of the enemy.

      September 11, 2012 at 12:23 pm |
    • BRC

      @William,
      I definitely agree with differentiating between Respect and Worship (and feel the same way about children, if a parent is abusive or neglectful, the child has no obligation to revere, love, or even like them just because they produced them. Children don't ask to be born, we chose to have them)

      @Robert,
      Exceptional work at adressing the concept of a hypothetical. Would you consider it telling at all if this "lie" occured, and your "God" never came along to correct the lie?

      September 11, 2012 at 12:36 pm |
    • Mike from CT

      Posted this question yesterday but never got a real response, so let's try again. Open question to believers: If real undeniable proof that a religion OTHER than yours is right is found (or divinely imparted on all of humanity), what would you do? WOuld you convert?

      Yes?

      As an athiest[sic], if there was ever PROOF that one of the world's religions was right, and it was one that believed in gods, I would stop being an athiest[sic]

      That is incorrect, there is no proof that your life is a dream and that any of it is really, but you go on living life as if it were real.

      Btw, by definition you are agnostic, atheist say there is no God. Agnostics say I have not seen proof to believe

      September 11, 2012 at 1:15 pm |
    • Pete

      Mike I say that because there is no evidence for god I therfore belive that there is not a god.

      September 11, 2012 at 1:18 pm |
    • BRC

      @Mike,
      I get that a lot. I can assure you I am an athiest. I actively believe that there are no gods. My interpretation of the universe and what I know of science and life (however limited it may be compared to all what we may one day know) tells me that there are no gods, and there never were. That being said, I've been wrong before, and as much as I hate to admit it when I am, it is unrealistic to say that I will never be wrong again. There is no evidence that points definitively to the existence of gods, so I believe that they DO NOT exist.

      September 11, 2012 at 1:29 pm |
    • Robert Brown

      BRC,

      It happens all the time. So far, he has protected this believer and I trust he will continue to do so.

      September 11, 2012 at 1:37 pm |
    • BRC

      @Robert,
      You believe that you've had divine protection fair enough, I doubt it, but I can't disprove it. HAs "God" signed his work? How do you know that was who protected you? Again, what if the god of another faith came to you and told you that it was in fact them that had protected you your whole life? Is there any form of proof that you would believe to tell you that another religion was true?

      September 11, 2012 at 1:48 pm |
    • .

      http://www.bibletools.org/index.cfm/fuseaction/Topical.show/RTD/CGG/ID/12421/Antichrists.htm

      September 11, 2012 at 2:38 pm |
    • Grand Ole Party of Christian Taliban

      Robert Brown

      There is only one God, so any "proof" otherwise would just be a trick of the enemy.
      ---------

      Folks I give you self imposed ignorance.....Robert Thomas

      At some point, we as a human race will have to eradicate this ignorance if we are to ever TRULY move forward. Hopefully it doesnt come to that and they simply eradicate themselves for their Gods.

      September 11, 2012 at 4:05 pm |
    • Robert Brown

      BRC,
      “HAs "God" signed his work? How do you know that was who protected you?”
      I don’t really know how to describe it other than to say a presence.
      “Again, what if the god of another faith came to you and told you that it was in fact them that had protected you your whole life? Is there any form of proof that you would believe to tell you that another religion was true?”
      The presence I mentioned above is the God who I met years ago, the same one who has been with me ever since. It might be difficult to change horses this far across the stream, so I really can’t think of anything that would convince me to switch.
      I know you don’t believe it, but God is real. He doesn’t reveal himself today the way he revealed himself in the old testament, because he has walked the earth in human flesh. Now we have his holy spirit. I can’t convince you that he is real, only he can do that, and I hope he does.

      September 12, 2012 at 6:00 am |
    • BRC

      @Robert Brown.
      I fear we have an insurmountable difference between our opinions. I understand what you're saying, but I do not follow "feelings" the way you do, so if "God" every wants me to believe it's real it has a high standard of evidence to provide.

      I could try and debate and nitpick with you that you still haven't explained how your feelings point to the Christain "God", that you felt a presence and YOU decided it was the Christian "God", but it's a matter of faith and feeling, so it isn't soemthing that can be justified (nor does it need to be as far as your own beliefs are concerned) and we're just going to have to agree to disagree.

      September 12, 2012 at 9:58 am |
  7. Millicent Grimble, 9/11 and Bush Years survivor and recovering Pringles™ addict

    As a survivor, I am glad and proud to be an American. If I hadn't survived, I'd be dead now. That's a big difference.

    September 11, 2012 at 9:10 am |
    • Athy

      "if I hadn't survived, I'd be dead now." Wow, that's a pretty profound statement, long-name.

      September 11, 2012 at 1:55 pm |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.