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My Take: God not in whirlwinds of Sandy, presidential race
A NASA image of Hurricane Sandy.
October 29th, 2012
01:33 PM ET

My Take: God not in whirlwinds of Sandy, presidential race

Editor's Note: Stephen Prothero, a Boston University religion scholar and author of "The American Bible: How Our Words Unite, Divide, and Define a Nation," is a regular CNN Belief Blog contributor.

By Stephen Prothero, Special to CNN

I am riding out Sandy on Cape Cod and wondering whether this, too, is God’s will.

As this storm has carved its path through the Caribbean and up the Eastern Seaboard of the United States, it has taken 67 lives and (so far) spared the rest of us. Was it the will of the Almighty that so many should perish?

Is God angry with Cuba, where 11 died last week? More angry with Haiti, where 51 perished? Relatively unperturbed with Jamaica, where the death toll was only two? If a tree falls on my house today, will that be an Act of God, too?

There has been a lot of talk lately about what is and what isn’t willed by Providence, thanks to Richard Mourdock, the Indiana Republican and U.S. Senate candidate who said last week, “I think that even when life begins in that horrible situation of rape, that it is something God intended to happen.”

Whether “it” in this sentence refers to rape or to conception, it assumes that God is both busy and capricious. Why does God offer the gift of life to some rape victims and not to others? Why does God allow some elections to be close and not others?

One answer, of course, is that God does nothing of the sort. Perhaps there is no God. Or perhaps God is more like the watchmaker divinity of Deism fame who winds up the universe, sets it in motion and then leaves it to its own devices.

In the thought worlds of Indian religions, things operate not by the will of God but in keeping with the laws of karma. So to put it in crudest terms, those who are injured in Sandy somehow have it coming to them, as do victims of rape who find themselves pregnant.

The western religions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam have argued that God has a hand not only in setting our story in motion but also in seeing it through to the end. So Jews, Christians, and Muslims have had to reckon with the classical problem of “theodicy”: In a world in which God is all powerful and all good, why do bad things happen to good people?

As I wrestle with these questions, I cannot help thinking about how differently my New England forebears interpreted these natural disasters. While we speak of the eye of the hurricane, New England's colonists were ever mindful of the eye of a God who was forever watching over them, and sending storms their way as punishment for their collective sins.

CNN’s Belief Blog: The faith angles behind the biggest stories

When the Great Colonial Hurricane raced up the east coast and lashed New England in August 1635, its 130 mph winds and 21-foot storm surge were almost universally viewed in supernatural rather than natural terms — as a judgment of God on the unfaithful.

We still have Puritans among us today, of course.

Televangelist Pat Robertson is notorious for turning natural disasters such as the Haiti earthquake and Hurricane Katrina into supernatural communications — God’s curse on Haiti or New Orleans for bad religion or widespread abortions. And with this “Stormpocalpyse” arriving on the eve of the election, I suspect some will suggest that the rain and the wind are God’s judgment on the leadership of President Obama.

Still, American society as a whole no longer interprets natural disasters as signs of a coming apocalypse or evidence of past misdeeds. When it comes to earthquakes and hurricanes, we tune in to the Weather Channel, not the Christian Broadcasting Network. And we interpret these events not through the rumblings of biblical prophets but through the scientific truths of air pressure and tectonic plates.

As a result of this sort of secular turn, we are much better at predicting the course of hurricanes. The Great Colonial Hurricane of 1635 arrived as a surprise and took many lives with it, including, according to the report of the Massachusetts governor, John Winthrop, those of eight Native Americans taken by the storm surge while “flying from their wigwams.” Sandy is a surprise to no one, thanks to science.

Still, we Americans cannot give up on talk of God’s will. At least according to Newt Gingrich, Mourdock’s foray into rape and theology reflects the position of “virtually every Catholic” in the United States. And if we are to believe the full-page ads taken out  by Billy Graham, God wills the victory of Mitt Romney over Barack Obama.

As for me, I am less sure about what God wills for our storms (political or otherwise). In my view, any God worth worshiping isn’t going to be so predictable, or so capricious.

I don’t think Graham, Mourdock, or Gingrich is speaking on behalf of God. They are speaking on behalf of themselves, on the basis of their own fears and experiences. And they are reading the Bible through their politics, not the other way around.

When it comes to storms like Sandy, I just don't believe in a God who drowns black babies in Haiti yet refuses to drown out the voices of cranky white men who claim so irreverently to speak in His name.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Stephen Prothero.

- CNN Belief Blog contributor

Filed under: 2012 Election • Belief • Billy Graham • Christianity • Church and state • Newt Gingrich • Politics • Science • United States

soundoff (2,188 Responses)
  1. Anybody know how to read?

    'Jhn 1:47 Jesus saw Nathanael coming to him, and saith of him, Behold an Israelite indeed, in whom is no guile!'

    October 30, 2012 at 11:55 am |
    • snowboarder

      read – considering not a single purported word of jesus was written down within decades of his fabled life, there really is no reason to believe a single word attributed to him.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:58 am |
    • Eliminate hinduism, religions corruption of truth absolute by hindu's lairs, for peace, Islam among humanity.

      Ya, by hindu fabrication Jesus, brewery master and hindu racist, calling children of human dogs. keep hinduism, filth of hindu Jews, filthy self centered, atheist for hindu Jew's, filthy secular s.

      October 30, 2012 at 12:23 pm |
    • BillBaker

      Snowboarder. There is a good book with tons of evidence that may change your mind. Please visit your local library and check out "Evidence That Demands a Verdict" by Josh McDowell. The evidence that Jesus lived, died and was resurrected for you is overwhelming. I think the evidence would stand up in an American court of law as being sufficient to prove the case. However, just as Jesus was rejected, this evidence will be rejected by those who are blinded from the truth.

      October 30, 2012 at 12:42 pm |
    • snowboarder

      bill – i'll check out the book, but i'm going to call BS on the courtroom comment.

      the resurrection and godhood of the fabled jesus is altimately nothing more than fable.

      October 30, 2012 at 12:59 pm |
    • Ken Margo

      @Billbaker I wont waste time or money reading garbage. For a guy people like you say is real, why doesn't he just appear and end all the nonsense. I guarantee you it would shut me up.

      October 30, 2012 at 1:05 pm |
    • OTOH

      BillBaker,

      See one (of many) refutations of Josh's work:

      http://users.iems.northwestern.edu/~hazen/McDowellRebuttal.html

      October 30, 2012 at 1:14 pm |
  2. Tigz

    In answer to your question "Where is God in all of this" the answer is that he is doing nothing about it.
    If one is to believe that God is the creator of everything, then one must also believe that he created this world to sustain life. The world has is own way of taking care of itself. God doesn't go around killing people (or at least hasn't since Sodom and Gomorrah, and his method of doing so is still unknown). He may, in his benevolence save some that would have otherwise perished, but those people may never know that his, or his angels, hands interceded in their behalf.

    When it comes to nature, God lets nature take care of itself. It would be too hard to constantly tinker with nature and not expect it to have disastrous consequences. Humans are just one species on this earth (the most destructive species at that) Unfortunately, nature has a way of winning out over humans, usually because humans tend to congregate where natural disasters occur.
    These "pastors" who are crediting (or blaming) God for these natural occurrences are talking out of the rear ends. Any person so gullible to believe them needs to have their head examined.

    October 30, 2012 at 11:48 am |
    • Huebert

      "It would be too hard to constantly tinker with nature and not expect it to have disastrous consequences"

      If God is omnipotent nothing can be "too hard" for him. If an omnipotent, omniscient, being existed its will would be reality.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:53 am |
    • snowboarder

      the contradictory logic of those trying to fit their religious beliefs into a natural world is always entertaining.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:56 am |
    • ME II

      @Tigz,
      This sounds like an elaborate rationalization of a distinct lack of evidence for any intercession by God whatsoever. At least, it seems that way to me.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:57 am |
    • Eliminate hinduism, religions corruption of truth absolute by hindu's lairs, for peace, Islam among humanity.

      "HE" created world in perfection and gave authority, Choice to do right to human, be in truth, hinduism, denial of truth absolute by hindu's, criminals invites mayhem, Karma, storm is result of human hinduism, denial of truth absolute with permission of truth absolute GOD.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:57 am |
    • Tigz

      Hubert, God is not Zeus or Atlas with the world on his back. This world is run by laws that govern nature and not by hocus pocus. Science and the belief of a supreme being can easily be reconciled to each other. We do not know how God created this world, but we do know that the natural laws occur. IF you believe in a God, do you not think that he would create the world in some sort of orderly fashion? Or do you think that he just "poofed" the world into existence and has little figurines of each human on some vast wall and takes some down from time to time and plays with them like Barbie dolls (or in the case of some groups....G.I.Joe's)

      October 30, 2012 at 12:03 pm |
    • ME II

      @Tigz,
      I agree that science and many limited versions of a supreme being are not incompatible. However, a God of a literal Bible is inconsistent with the evidence we have so far.

      As for "poofing" the world into existence, both "poofing" and "speaking" the universe into existence seems equally lacking in details and believability. Likewise, "breathing" life into man.

      October 30, 2012 at 12:16 pm |
    • Huebert

      Tigz

      If you are arguing for a deist style, clock-maker, god I would agree that science can easily coincide with that belief. This is because the deist god does not interact with the universe in any way. Problems only occur when you believe that god interacts with the universe.

      October 30, 2012 at 12:16 pm |
  3. Eliminate hinduism, religions corruption of truth absolute by hindu's lairs, for peace, Islam among humanity.

    hindu's crooks speak of their hindu soul, filthy desire and corrupt truth absolute and claim it to be from truth absolute GOD.Expect nothing better but mayhem among humanity by following of hinduism, denial of truth absolute, Allah, and following of hindu pagan Mithra ism, savior ism, neither commanded, nor allowed in Islam as a religion, but Theen Allah, consti tution of truth absolute. Foundation of American consti tution.
    Shiaism
    hindu Mithra ism, savior ism invented little over 100 years after Sydana Mohammad pbh by tribes of Kujar of north Africa and imposition as Fatmid Khalaphit by force by denial of Hidth and Quran, justified by hindu Judaism, pagan secularism to impose hinduism, racism by hindu, fabricated relationship with Family of Syadana Mohammad pbh to justify existence of hindu criminal Kings, a violation of fundamental commandment, human equality under the LA. truth absolute Allah. Cause of conflict among Muslim's and cause of down fall of Muslim's and Islam in Spain.

    Sunisim, invented by Turk's by corruption of Quran and hidth to justify existence of hindu King's as Khalipha, after death of Ruler Mohammad, but later renamed, Mehmmat, wisdom of spirit of truth by siblings from his Armenian wife, follower of hindu pagan Mithra ism, savior ism in 13th century.

    Christianity, invented by hinduism,. corruption of truth absolute by hindu Pharisees, pagan self centered, follower of hindu filthy pig ism by corrupted Torah, known as Greek Torah, translated and commented by Ben Asheer in 250 AD in Yiddish, secularist, self centered language, also known as Old Testament, part of book of Mithra ism labeled as Bible. A way to justify hindu criminal Kings and self proclaimed Prophets, fortune tellers as god's to rule over humanity.

    JUDAISM, Self center ism, pig ism, or Atheism, invented by hindu's pagan's of Egypt by corruption of truth absolute in Torah to Justify hindu pagan Pharaoh's and their hindu pagan Santans, goons as god's to rule over humanity with impunity.

    HAVE hINDUISM, CORRUPTION OF TRUTH ABSOLUTE, RELIGIONS AND LIVE WITH MAYHEM, AS HAS BEEN THE CASE FROM hIND, DARK AGES TILL TODAY. FOLLOW THEEN ALLAH, CONSTI TUTION OF TRUTH ABSOLUTE, ALLAH , GOD AND THE LORD, FOUNDATION OF CONSTI TUTION OF AMERICA TO HAVE PEACE AMONG HUMANITY. To learn more please visit truthisthelimit.com

    October 30, 2012 at 11:47 am |
  4. Master of the Moon

    It's incredible to me that this author still "wrestle[s] with these questions." What? First off, there is no evidence that the Judeo-Christian-Islamic God exists. Everything that western civilization has done in the past few hundred years, essentially seeking and explaining the natural world, further and further erodes any notion that this God exists. Second, any rational, critically thinking person can surmise that this God doesn't exist. Finally, the EASIEST explanation of things like hurricanes and tornadoes is purely naturalistic. We don't need to reach for less plausible answers like "God's wrath" or "God's will" and have to explain and deconflict the difficult implications which this author alludes to. The ONLY way one can continue to believe in this God is to be deluded or delude himself. This article, in my opinion, is a description of the unresolvable struggles within the minds of deluded peoples.

    October 30, 2012 at 11:45 am |
  5. ImLook'nUp

    This is what comes to mind on "Sandy"

    ROMANS 9:27
    Isaiah cries out concerning Israel:
    "Though the number of the Israelites be like the sand by the sea, only the remnant will be saved."

    October 30, 2012 at 11:44 am |
    • Madtown

      Interesting. I don't get "hurricane" out of that piece of scripture at all, maybe it's just me. That's the thing with biblical scripture, give 10 people the same piece, you get 10 different interpretations.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:48 am |
  6. snowboarder

    any god sending a message via a natural occurrence, requiring an "interpretation" of its meaning, is a dunce.

    October 30, 2012 at 11:42 am |
    • Gregory Barr

      You should read the entire chapter 16 of Revelation . Sandy is a mere squall compared to things not yet revealed.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:50 am |
    • midwest rail

      If they are not yet revealed, then you have no idea how they will compare.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:54 am |
    • itsallaloadofbollocks

      Gregory. If they're not revealed, how do you know?

      October 30, 2012 at 11:55 am |
    • Sandy Baar

      Gregory, Revelations is just a bad drug trip and has no concrete predictions of events with dates at all. Anyone can predict doom and gloom, but with no dates, ain't worth a plugged nickel.

      Now finish those corn flakes and get your ass off to work.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:55 am |
    • Ken Margo

      You guys are going to mess Gregory up. You're using common sense.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:56 am |
    • snowboarder

      greg – revelation is the ramblings of a lunatic

      October 30, 2012 at 12:00 pm |
    • sam stone

      gregory...empty proxy warnings are dumb

      October 30, 2012 at 12:12 pm |
    • Ann

      I've always thought that these "visions" you hear about in the bible were probably due to food poisoning or some other type of illness they couldn't explain back then (mental illness included).

      Mary was probably having a fever from some spoiled goat meat or something, when the "angel" Gabriel broke into her house and took advantage of the poor girl.

      October 30, 2012 at 12:16 pm |
  7. rs

    Non-believers can't understand this but there are a couple things to keep in mind : Number 1 is that we are all going to die. Only to those that reject Christ will death be a horrible fate. Number 2, as Christians we know that God does not promise that our lives will be easy, actually He tells us quite the contrary. However, In Romans 8:28 God promises us that :All things work together for good for those that love the Lord....Good doesn't mean good as in happy,happy, everything is wonderful . Good has a much deeper meaning and it is impossible for anyone not a Christian to understand. As is proven in every faith based article that allows comments.

    October 30, 2012 at 11:42 am |
    • Madtown

      Only to those that reject Christ will death be a horrible fate
      -----
      Ok, well what about the millions of humans who have just never heard of Christ, and never will? What's their fate?

      October 30, 2012 at 11:44 am |
    • snowboarder

      rs – "it is impossible for anyone not a christian to understand"

      i love the secret decoder ring fallacy.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:45 am |
    • Huebert

      I do not believe that my inevitable death is a horrible fate. I imagine that it will be exactly like the 13 billion years that occurred before I was borne, or if you are a creationist, like the 6000 years that occurred before I was borne. Either way, I didn't mind being dead at all during that time.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:47 am |
    • hal 9001

      I'm sorry, "rs", but the most of your assertions are unfounded. Your assertion that "we are all going to die" is the only correct assertion. Your truth value score for this post is 0.9%.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:50 am |
    • Ken Margo

      What a bunch of bull cookies. Your first point, "Number 1 is that we are all going to die." How long did it take you to figure that out! What about infants that die. They don't get a chance to reject g-od. Is their death going to be a horrible fate? Now you're telling us what "Good" is. People like you don't solve problems, you keep them going with nonsense.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:52 am |
    • itsallaloadofbollocks

      If all will be wonderful when you die, what are you waiting around for?

      October 30, 2012 at 11:53 am |
    • Master of the Moon

      I love this answer. Quoting writing which for hundreds of years have been shown by biblical criticism to be man-made writings. rs, your faith is based on a fallacy you call Scripture, you believe in a Jewish god who has morphed over time, your belief in Jesus is based on the Gospel and the Epistles, writings which any critical thinking person who studies them can see are written by man, are full of contradictions, and are implausible. Your faith is fortified by Christian apologetics, explanations that satisfy the feeble minded but crumble under criticism. Furthermore, the Christian faith is based on the "winning" view of Jesus and what he did/meant, one of hundreds of competing views in the first few hundred years of the modern era. Take your head out of the Bible and the Christian Apologetics hole for a moment and do some studying. Read some books by Bart Ehrman, Robert M. Price, Karen Armstrong, John W. Loftus, Richard A. Horsley or any dozens of respected biblical scholars. Listen to podcasts like Reasonable Doubts. Compare the drivel of Christian apologists like Ravi Zacharias, RC Sproul, William Lane Craig and their ilk to the reasoned, critically analyzed musings of these great thinkers and researchers.

      October 30, 2012 at 12:02 pm |
    • ArthurP

      We are all going to die. Well will all end up worm food.

      October 30, 2012 at 12:13 pm |
    • sam stone

      "Good has a much deeper meaning and it is impossible for anyone not a Christian to understand. As is proven in every faith based article that allows comments."

      Right, Christians have a much more complete understanding of what "good" is. Nothing pompous about that, rs

      October 30, 2012 at 12:16 pm |
    • sam stone

      "Only to those that reject Christ will death be a horrible fate"

      Wow.... very scary...for those who accept that drivel

      October 30, 2012 at 12:20 pm |
    • Ann

      Arthur – I don't plan to be worm food. I'm going to be cremated. I don't think worms eat ashes.

      Instead, I'll be fighting the effects of acid rain! (ashes are alkaline)

      October 30, 2012 at 12:22 pm |
  8. crappygovernment

    Maybe Sandy is for the Jets. They are the ones blacklisting Tim Tebow because he is an outspoken Christian.

    October 30, 2012 at 11:41 am |
    • midwest rail

      bullsh!t

      October 30, 2012 at 11:42 am |
    • Huebert

      I thought they blacklisted him because he was an awful quarterback.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:44 am |
    • Ken Margo

      More insane paranoid talk from an imbecile republican. TIM TEBOW CAN'T PLAY, DEAL WITH IT. G-OD SURE DIDN'T HELP HIM WHEN DENVER PLAYED NEW ENGLAND.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:55 am |
    • Mark from Middle River

      "Passing: M. Sanchez (NYJ) – 283 YDS, 1 TD, 1 INT" source: ESPN.Com

      Jets are holding with Sanchez, let them. Tebow might have kept them in the game.

      October 30, 2012 at 12:00 pm |
    • Ken Margo

      The Jets didn't show up. Sanchez stats were during pure garbage time when miami played a prevent defense. If Tim Tebow is sooooo gooood Why did Denver get rid of him?

      October 30, 2012 at 12:04 pm |
    • Mark from Middle River

      Cause ... I do not know, maybe cause a guy named Peyton was hired? He is a good quarterback but even his fans know he is not a elite, but chances are better than Sanchez.

      October 30, 2012 at 12:41 pm |
    • Ken Margo

      Let clear this up. Denver got rid of a "good quarterback" for a guy who had FOUR neck surgeries and didn't have full strength in his arm. Oh yeah, I'd sign up for that.

      October 30, 2012 at 12:49 pm |
    • Mark from Middle River

      "Despite banging his throwing thumb on an opponent's helmet in the second quarter, Manning passed for 305 yards and three scores, led a pair of 90-plus-yard touchdown drives and easily outplayed Drew Brees to lead the Denver Broncos to a 34-14 victory over the Saints. In his first year in Denver, Peyton Manning has been stellar, and now his teammates are beginning to follow suit, Bill Williamson writes. Manning surpassed the 300-yard mark for the fifth straight time to match his personal best and set a franchise record for Denver (4-3). He completed 22 of 30 throws for a passer rating of 138.9."source ESPN.

      He is Peyton... and I hate him as a quarterback as much as I hate Brady and defending him is horrible.

      October 30, 2012 at 12:56 pm |
    • Ken Margo

      When Peyton was available there was no guarantee he would have success. There were many in the media that predicted he wouldn't. My point is TIM TEBOW is soooo G-od awful (pun intended) Denver was willing to take the risks.

      October 30, 2012 at 1:08 pm |
  9. palintwit

    Right now Mitt Romney is setting up a special hot line for all the New York investment bankers whose Mercedes were damaged in the storm.

    October 30, 2012 at 11:41 am |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      Okay. I laughed.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:43 am |
    • Mark from Middle River

      I thought the New York bankers and Stock Exchange folks are more with Oba? Remember he did bail out the banks ... not us lesser folks in his and the Dems eyes. I guess, that its Obas version "trickle down economics". 😦

      October 30, 2012 at 11:52 am |
    • Ken Margo

      He had to save the banks to save our economy! Please explain how letting the banks fail, Wall street fail taking our money with them, wiping out our 401k pensions and other life savings. How would that be good for us?

      October 30, 2012 at 12:02 pm |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      Ken is absolutely right. Had Obama not acted to save the banks, we'd be suffering the second Great Depression.

      October 30, 2012 at 12:20 pm |
    • derp

      "I thought the New York bankers and Stock Exchange folks are more with Oba? Remember he did bail out the banks"

      Are you referring to the Troubled Asset Relief Program, you know, the "bank bailout", that Henry Paulson crafted and George W. Bush signed, three months before Barack Obama took office?

      October 30, 2012 at 12:26 pm |
    • Mark from Middle River

      Come on guys, when saving the banks is looked at as a positive then it is Oba had to save the banks. When it is looked on as a negative it is G.W.Bush who did it.

      I guess yall didn't get your daily email briefing of talking points from the White House. 🙂

      Also, most of the jobs that Oba and I guess Bush have given us are not ones that have a 401k strong enough to live off of or do not offer ones at all.

      October 30, 2012 at 12:38 pm |
    • Nii

      oH tOM tOM
      sO yOU bELIEVE iN SOMETHING. LOL

      October 30, 2012 at 12:39 pm |
    • Ken Margo

      The people that look at it as a negative are brain dead TEA Party members, birthers and republicans. Reasonable people see it for what it was. If The president was white, there would be a conga line around the planet lining up to kiss his azz.

      October 30, 2012 at 12:45 pm |
    • Mark from Middle River

      >>>"The people that look at it as a negative are brain dead TEA Party members, birthers and republicans. "

      Funny, was it not also the folks of the occupy Wall Street movement who were also against the bailing out of the rich bankers.

      So, if you are saying that both the Tea Party folks and Occupy Movement folks are wrong ...then doesn't that make you part of the 1% and the rich folks that Oba loves more than the rest of us?

      October 30, 2012 at 12:59 pm |
    • Ken Margo

      The over whelming majority people of wall street wanted an even playing field! They were upset that after the people helped the banks out. The banks weren't helping the people out. The 99% want a fair playing field for all. Not just the wealthy. That is what the movement is about.

      October 30, 2012 at 1:13 pm |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      Yeah, Nii, I believe you're an idiot.

      October 30, 2012 at 1:16 pm |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      Piddler, when you earn that graduate degree in economics, alert the media.

      October 30, 2012 at 1:17 pm |
  10. palintwit

    It's my understanding that Sarah Palin is personally leading the relief efforts in the aftermath of this storm. She is taking with her a large platter of mooseburgers and s'mores which she will distribute to the homeless stock traders on Wall St.

    October 30, 2012 at 11:34 am |
    • Mark from Middle River

      Remember the Saturday Night Live skit joking VP Biden? According to them Biden is going to be restoring Amtrak service all on his own. 🙂

      [youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Mv8mD0zUrs&w=640&h=360]

      October 30, 2012 at 11:48 am |
  11. snowboarder

    this may be the only time i have actually ever agreed with this author.

    October 30, 2012 at 11:31 am |
    • Huebert

      dido.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:32 am |
    • Madtown

      The last paragraph in particular speaks volumes.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:37 am |
  12. snowboarder

    anyone attributing divine meaning to natural phenomenon is either a charlatan or delusional.

    October 30, 2012 at 11:28 am |
    • Louise

      Ever notice how they thank god for everything good that happens but don't blame god for all the bad? If you want to believe in that stuff, then every single thing that happens on this earth is his will. Period.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:36 am |
  13. Richard N. Griffin

    Just listen to Jehovah`s Witnesses next time they call on you. They will explain everything directly from the Bible. No more needs to be said.

    October 30, 2012 at 11:28 am |
    • midwest rail

      Or you can tell them it's rude to randomly show up at people's doorsteps preaching nonsense.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:29 am |
    • snowboarder

      when they show up at my door i like to interject random questions about their s3x lives.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:32 am |
    • Huebert

      I answer the door naked every time they show up. I've tried to invite them in to have a discussion with me, but they never take up my offer.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:34 am |
    • Madtown

      Just listen to Jehovah`s Witnesses next time they call on you
      ------
      Why don't they bring cookies? I'd give them 10 minutes if they rolled up with some double chocolate chip.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:42 am |
    • oodles of noodles

      Gosh – why would I listen to those nuttards? They don't even have any good cookies to sell.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:43 am |
    • Ken Margo

      @Huebert. Brilliant. But why do they keep coming back. is it the same ones? Don't they pass the word to their fellow believers? Maybe if you open door with a full extension, maybe then they will leave you alone? 🙂

      October 30, 2012 at 11:45 am |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      I was in my teens when one of them showed up. He couldn't manage to pronounce "Apocalypse." I went to a fundie Baptist church around the same time and the minister talked about a composer named "Beth hoven."

      I wrote the fundies off after that.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:45 am |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      laughing @ Huebert's tactic.

      I'd pay cash money to see....um...never mind.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:46 am |
    • snowboarder

      i will tell you i was impressed by the mormons that came to my door. i was in the midst of demolishing my kitchen and two young guys in suits showed up at the door. i was pulling down drywall and i was filthy. the guys actually took off their jackets and started rolling up their sleeves. they offered to help me do the work if i was willing to listen to them.

      i respectfully declined, but i was impressed.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:50 am |
    • Mark from Middle River

      You know, that is scary. They came to my door a few time and when the lady found out that I was single with out a family, the next week she showed up with a single member of her congregation who just happened to be walking with her that day.

      Honest to goodness story. I still respectfully declined but now hearing about them helping with your kitchen.... I wonder... 🙂

      October 30, 2012 at 11:56 am |
    • Huebert

      @Ken

      I've only had to do it once in each city I've lived in. Apparently answering the door naked is the fastest to get JW's to cross your house off of their list.

      @Tom tom

      ...........................................................

      October 30, 2012 at 12:08 pm |
    • Ken Margo

      @snowboarder To redo a kitchen is hard work. Their bs was so unbelievable too you, you refused FREE labor to keep from hearing it. You're a good person. I would've kept them coming back until the job was done, then cuss them out of the neighborhood!

      October 30, 2012 at 12:14 pm |
    • sam stone

      It's much more fun to slam the door in their faces

      October 30, 2012 at 12:24 pm |
    • Ann

      I don't know about answering the door naked (no point in traumatizing the kids THAT much) but I'd probably happen to have my shotgun in hand. Cleaning it, of course.

      October 30, 2012 at 12:24 pm |
    • Huebert

      Ann

      I doubt that it was a traumatizing experience. I think I look good naked.

      October 30, 2012 at 12:38 pm |
    • Ken Margo

      @Sam Stone You should change your name to "Stone Cold" 🙂

      October 30, 2012 at 12:39 pm |
    • Ken Margo

      @Huebert and Ann Which kids are you talking about? Yours or the ones at the door.

      October 30, 2012 at 12:41 pm |
    • Huebert

      @Ken

      I don't have any kids, and the JW's at my door were my age, mid 20's.

      October 30, 2012 at 12:43 pm |
    • Ken Margo

      @Huebert Don't you worry that your neighbors may see you? with cameras all over the place, you might end up on Youtube!

      October 30, 2012 at 12:55 pm |
    • Huebert

      Ken

      That thought did not occur to me at the time. Though honestly, I don't think that I would be very perturbed if my wedding tackle ended up on YouTube.

      October 30, 2012 at 1:00 pm |
    • Ken Margo

      @huebert Wedding Tackle? That's a new one. I'll try it when i see my wife.

      October 30, 2012 at 1:17 pm |
    • Ann

      Yah, I meant the missionaries, too. No worries about the neighbors, though – I live in the woods!

      (And, H, I'm afraid the missionaries would have had a better time seeing me naked 20 years ago. Now it's just scary!)

      October 30, 2012 at 3:57 pm |
  14. Rummy Pirate Times-Dispatch (In Greed We Trust)

    http://www.examiner.com/article/mitt-romney-implicated-perjury-and-stock-fraud-made-millions-process

    October 30, 2012 at 11:26 am |
  15. Rummy Pirate Times-Dispatch (In Greed We Trust)

    Bain closed GST Steel plant in 2001 laying off 750 workers.

    October 30, 2012 at 11:25 am |
  16. Rummy Pirate Times-Dispatch (In Greed We Trust)

    Southern Illinois:

    Controlling share owner Bain Capital closes BRP plant so the 340 jobs there could be outsourced to Mexico.

    October 30, 2012 at 11:24 am |
  17. Rummy Pirate Times-Dispatch (In Greed We Trust)

    In 1994, Bain invested $27 million as part of a deal with other firms to acquire Dade International, a medical-diagnostics-equipment firm, from its parent company, Baxter International. Bain ultimately made nearly 10 times its money, getting back $230 million. But Dade wound up laying off more than 1,600 people and filed for bankruptcy protection in 2002, amid crushing debt and rising interest rates. The company, with Bain in charge, had borrowed heavily to do acquisitions, accumulating $1.6 billion in debt by 2000. The company cut benefits for some workers at the acquired firms and laid off others. When it merged with Behring Diagnostics, a German company, Dade shut down three U.S. plants. At the same time, Dade paid out $421 million to Bain Capital’s investors and investing partners.

    October 30, 2012 at 11:23 am |
  18. snowboarder

    of course "god is not in the whirlwind".

    what kind of imbecile would actually believe otherwise?

    October 30, 2012 at 11:23 am |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      truth be told and all of its sock puppets.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:35 am |
    • HarryJ

      The Bible says otherwise. Psalm 148:8
      Fire, and hail; snow, and vapours; stormy wind fulfilling his word:

      October 30, 2012 at 11:41 am |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      the bible says a burning bush talked, too. So?

      October 30, 2012 at 11:47 am |
    • snowboarder

      harry – the bible is a collection of rarely noble myths.

      October 30, 2012 at 11:52 am |
    • sam stone

      "what kind of imbecile would actually believe otherwise?" – snowboarder

      "The Bible says otherwise" – HarryJ

      I guess that answers it

      October 30, 2012 at 12:29 pm |
    • OTOH

      HarryJ,

      So, exactly where are those "storehouses for snow and hail" up in the sky?

      (from Job 38)

      October 30, 2012 at 1:20 pm |
  19. Rummy Pirate Times-Dispatch (In Greed We Trust)

    For 15 years, Romney had been in the business of creative destruction and wealth creation. But what about his claims of job creation? Though Bain Capital surely helped expand some companies that had created jobs, the layoffs and closures at other firms would lead Romney’s political opponents to say that he had amassed a fortune in part by putting people out of work. The lucrative deals that made Romney wealthy could exact a cost. Maximizing financial return to investors could mean slashing jobs, closing plants, and moving production overseas. It could also mean clashing with union workers, serving on the board of a company that ran afoul of federal laws, and loading up already struggling companies with debt.

    October 30, 2012 at 11:22 am |
  20. Rummy Pirate Times-Dispatch (In Greed We Trust)

    Marc Wolpow, a former Bain partner who worked with Romney on many deals, said the discussion at buyout companies typically does not focus on whether jobs will be created. “It’s the opposite—what jobs we can cut,” Wolpow said. “Because you had to document how you were going to create value. Eliminating redundancy, or the elimination of people, is a very valid way."

    October 30, 2012 at 11:21 am |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.