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My Take: No pressure, Mr. President
Author Eric Metaxas speaks alongside President Barack Obama at the National Prayer Breakfast in Washington in February.
December 10th, 2012
05:00 AM ET

My Take: No pressure, Mr. President

Editor's Note: Eric Metaxas is the author of "No Pressure, Mr. President! The Power Of True Belief In A Time Of Crisis: The National Prayer Breakfast Speech."

By Eric Metaxas, Special to CNN

(CNN)–Imagine that the president of the United States had to sit and listen to you for 30 minutes in a public setting. Imagine that he couldn't escape and had to endure whatever you said. If you disagreed with him politically, would you try to embarrass him? What would you say?

Well, this actually happened to me. A year ago I was invited to be the keynote speaker at the National Prayer Breakfast in Washington, an event attended by the president, first lady, vice president, and 3,500 other dignitaries. No one was more shocked at the invitation than I. Previous speakers include Mother Teresa, Tony Blair and Bono. No pressure.

By the way, I disagree with the president in some important ways. But as a Christian, God commands me to love those with whom I disagree, to treat them with civility and respect, as creatures made in God's image. That's a command, not a request or a suggestion. Again, no pressure.

In my speech I spoke about my heroes, William Wilberforce and Dietrich Bonhoeffer. Wilberforce's faith led him to fight for the Africans being enslaved by the British; Bonhoeffer's faith led him to fight for the Jews being persecuted by the Nazis. I used them as examples of people who passionately lived out their faith by standing up for their fellow human beings when most around them merely gave it lip service.

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I also joked around a lot, because as any of my friends will tell you, one of the ways I show love is by joking and teasing people.  Who said prayer breakfasts had to be boring?  At one point I said that George W. Bush had read my Bonhoeffer book, and then I glanced at President Obama and said "No pressure."  I'm glad he laughed!

Later in my speech, I talked specifically about the idea of loving our enemies. I said this was the test of real faith. Speaking to my fellow pro-lifers, I said that those of us who believe the unborn to be human beings must love those on the other side of that issue. I also said that those of us with a traditionally biblical view of sexuality are sometimes demonized as bigots, but we must love even those who call us bigots. I cited Wilberforce and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. as two men who took seriously God's command to love their enemies in the midst of the most serious political battles of their day.  They honored God in how they fought, and he honored them.

At the end of the breakfast the president told me he would read my book on Bonhoeffer, and Vice President Biden took my picture with the president. No kidding. It was an extraordinary day and I'm not telling the half of it.

President Barack Obama holds up a book given to him by author Eric Metaxas

But the reason I'm writing now is that during the past election I was disappointed to see the president's campaign utterly abandoning these ideals of treating your opponents as you yourself would wish to be treated. Good people with principled and profound convictions about when life begins were cynically demonized as "enemies of women."  Americans who had worked hard to build businesses, and who had given millions to charity and to the government, were denounced as fat-cats who weren't "paying their fair share" and whose wealth was ill-gotten gain.

These scorched-earth tactics were not presidential, much less Christian, and because the president openly professes a Christian faith, I feel I must speak about this.

CNN’s Belief Blog: The faith angles behind the biggest stories

Of course many will dismiss campaign hardball rhetoric as "what works." This is to miss the point. What we say matters deeply, and how we say it matters deeply.  All of it has serious long-term consequences.  For all of us.

For one thing, our children are watching and listening. We tell them it's less important who wins or loses than how we play the game. Is there no truth to this at all? Do we not see that this behavior erodes faith in the very political process and in democracy itself? Do we not see that by doing this we encourage our opponents to do the same - and worse - the next time around?  Shouldn't we care about that?

Any victory won in an ugly way is somehow a tainted victory. In this case, the president has "won" a deeply divided nation, one that he - alas - has had a hand in dividing. Now what?

If he is to succeed in the tremendous challenges that lay ahead, he must repent of these tactics and must make amends with his opponents, if it's not too late.  Or else he will face gridlock and more gridlock.  He also must show the door to those who cynically encouraged this "winning is the only thing" behavior.

His legacy and America's future depend upon it. Many will be praying for him.

No pressure.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Eric Metaxas.

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Barack Obama • Belief • Christianity • Church and state • Politics

soundoff (2,208 Responses)
  1. Lars J

    Now if the author had written "Woe is me, I am a man of unclean lips and I dwell among a people of unclean lips" we might have something special here. Instead we have garden variety political demagoguery: "He is wrong and I am right." So human. Another great opportunity missed.

    December 11, 2012 at 1:46 am |
  2. GrowUp

    Asians are studying math, science and engineering. Meanwhile, we have "home schooled" and "privately schooled" children studying creationism, gardens of Eden, forbidden fruits and immaculate conceptions. Any bets who comes out on top in the 21st century??

    December 11, 2012 at 1:36 am |
    • montrose

      Yes. Children of missionaries are in Who's Who in American Universities in overwhelming numbers compared with their peers.

      December 11, 2012 at 2:33 am |
    • mama k

      That sounds like a wild claim, Monty – do you have any sources for that claim?

      December 11, 2012 at 2:57 am |
  3. Andrew

    And Romney didn't do the same thing? Unfortunately this world and specifically politics are not so ideal and perfect as you are

    December 11, 2012 at 1:30 am |
    • David

      When Mr. Metaxas takes the Rmoney campaign and the GOP to task, I'll take note of what he says.

      When he criticizes the Pro-Life movement for insisting that those that disagree with them are unChristian, I'll consider him different than the hypocrites he hangs out with.

      When he and other Christian leaders stand up for the President against those that claim he's a Muslim or a foreigner or some other ludicrous thing, then I'll accept his words as being heart-felt and honest.

      Until then, he's just another wingnut.

      I'm a born-again, fundamentalist Christian. And these narrow-minded idealogues tick me off.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:36 am |
    • montrose

      so please biblically defend abortion.

      December 11, 2012 at 2:13 am |
  4. theresa

    check out the new John Lennon video http://www.geniusthemovie.com

    December 11, 2012 at 1:30 am |
  5. GrowUp

    Science flies you to the moon and beyond. Religion flies you into buildings.

    December 11, 2012 at 1:29 am |
  6. bongobottom

    The garbage the Romney campaigned spewed was expedience over any supposed principle. What is this guy smoking?

    December 11, 2012 at 1:19 am |
  7. Scott

    Yup, a story about a man of faith and the religion haters go ape all over it. So much for the ... gag ... tolerant left.

    Scott

    December 11, 2012 at 1:09 am |
    • Athy

      We don't hate religion, Scottie. We just don't believe in it. Got it?

      December 11, 2012 at 1:15 am |
    • GrowUp

      Faith in what? Self aggrandizement? Bigotry? Ignorance? Myopia? Winner take all? Hate? Self righteousness? Personal pipelines to God? Self anointed as "chosen" over others? Sounds pretty self serving and morally bankrupt to me.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:15 am |
    • sam

      Thanks for signing your post with...your screen name. Because we weren't sure who you were.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:16 am |
    • Observer

      Scott,

      Gay rights. Pro-choice. Truth about Obama. So much for the ..gag... tolerant right.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:16 am |
    • montrose

      OBY – don't you understand that gay rights are not the new civil rights? the gay lobby just wants more and more. they want to redefine marriage; no father, no mother – no words to that affect.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:58 am |
    • Athy

      And how does this affect you, Montrose?

      December 11, 2012 at 2:01 am |
    • montrose

      I'm a citizen.

      December 11, 2012 at 2:09 am |
    • Athy

      So?

      December 11, 2012 at 2:13 am |
    • Observer

      montrose,

      Less than 50 years ago marriage was defined in several states as being within one race. It has been redefined several times.

      Try again.

      December 11, 2012 at 2:13 am |
    • montrose

      race and gender are not the same. shall we support marrying pets next? it has been suggested.

      December 11, 2012 at 2:15 am |
    • GrowUp

      @montrose. Your "logic" is hysterical. That's like saying if you let a man and a woman marry, you have to let pets marry too. Sorry dude but that dog won't hunt, as it were.

      December 11, 2012 at 2:23 am |
    • montrose

      you pose as a thinker, but perhaps you just type quickly and things and words fly out of control.

      December 11, 2012 at 2:27 am |
    • GrowUp

      Perhaps you don't understand the difference between logic and straw man arguments. You seem to have perfected the latter. You need to work on the former.

      December 11, 2012 at 2:34 am |
    • montrose

      didn't you mean "man and a man" in your twice previous post? In a post-modern world everything is acceptable because there are no absolutes. so, hypothetically there is nothing to keep us from defining marriage as including other species or men with boys.

      December 11, 2012 at 2:45 am |
    • mama k

      Race are people, gender are people, Monty. The current laws that prevent what is accepted (voted on) as OK for age constraints are in place for traditional marriage as well as for mixed/same race marriage as well as for mixed/same gender marriage (in states where same-sex marriage has already been adopted. Poor attempt to shove gay marriage in an unkind light Monty.

      December 11, 2012 at 3:02 am |
  8. David N

    Hmmmmm. Was this guy seeing the same election I was. Why is he not going after the republicans? Their party was much more an example of " utterly abandoning these ideals of treating your opponents as you yourself would wish to be treated
    .
    And the Good people with principled and profound convictions about when life begins were cynically demonized as "enemies of women." because they care only about the unborn but what about the born. Then you are on your own, as the republicans would gut all the programs which would help people in a vulnerable position

    Americans who had worked hard to build businesses, and who had given millions to charity and to the government, were denounced as fat-cats who weren't "paying their fair share" and whose wealth was ill-gotten gain. Once again many of them are, does any one really think the "Job Creators" are going to create jobs because of the tax cuts or bank it. They will create jobs after they have overworked their staff taken away most of their benefits" because times are so hard" Prior to the Bush tax cuts the economy was doing pretty well all classes. This is a one side Republican article it is as fair and balanced as the Fox network

    December 11, 2012 at 1:07 am |
    • counter

      correlation does not equal causation. The recession was caused by greedy bankers.

      The tax cuts grew the economy, and that is a fact.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:36 am |
    • redzoa

      I'd be interested in the evidence supporting tax cuts grew the economy. I'd be particularly interested in evidence which distinguishes the various forms of tax cuts (that is, high-middle-low income, capital gains, etc). From what I've read, this policy argument isn't supported by the numbers, for example:

      http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/16/opinion/sunday/do-tax-cuts-lead-to-economic-growth.html?_r=0

      I frankly don't have any background in this area and so my request is genuine, not a snarky response...

      December 11, 2012 at 2:16 am |
    • montrose

      I LIKE REDZOA'S GENUINE OVERTURE.

      December 11, 2012 at 2:20 am |
  9. GrowUp

    Stop trying to enshrine your religious beliefs into law. It is Un-American to pass laws to require others to abide by your religious beliefs. If that is the kind of country you want, then go live in Iran. End of discussion.

    December 11, 2012 at 1:02 am |
    • montrose

      OR will you impose your secular religion on others?

      December 11, 2012 at 1:29 am |
    • GrowUp

      @montrose. "Secular" is neither a religion nor a belief. Do you even know what the word means? Are you that uneducated and brainwashed? Nobody is trying to pass laws saying you can't abide by your religious beliefs. Have at it–in your home, church, synagogue, mosque, backyard, mind, etc. Just stop trying to make others do it too. That, sir, is Un-American.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:42 am |
    • montrose

      the public square of ideas includes faith not excludes.

      December 11, 2012 at 2:00 am |
    • Athy

      What the hell is "secular religion?" I'm beginning to think Montrose is a child.

      December 11, 2012 at 2:03 am |
    • montrose

      that which we do not understand we rail against...ATHY

      December 11, 2012 at 2:17 am |
    • Athy

      Monty, Perhaps you could enlighten us about "secular religion." We patiently await your words of wisdom.

      December 11, 2012 at 2:25 am |
    • mama k

      Yeah – I want to hear this explanation too. So far what I'm hearing is very Chardonian.

      December 11, 2012 at 2:42 am |
  10. Rogue351

    President Obama need not repent. The Tea Party, Religious Right and the Republicans are another story. Four long years of backing hate radio talking heads like Hannity, Limbaugh and Beck. Turning a nation against a sitting president that via popular vote was re-elected. Now these same individuals constantly pound on the president even when their own party has the power to improve our nation by following the recommendations of the worlds most powerful man and avoiding the fiscal cliff. The Republicans, Tea Party and Religious right have and will continue to use all means possible to paint this president i a bad light rather if it is good for America or not. Using hatred, discrimination, threats of firing employees, anti gay messages, trying unsuccessfully to miss lead the public about our relations with Israel. And last but certainly not least moving the attack on one of our own consults against the president. But never mentioning the scores of embassy and people that dies from attacks while Bush was in office. The Republicans had better start playing ball or they may not have enough support in the years to come to even get in the game. The Tea Party is by it's own definition "Against our federal government" and our certainly not looking out for the people but for themselves in an attempt to grab power. And the Religious right, you have gone far enough. Remember separation of church and state ? If you want to be involved in the political process start paying taxes like the rest of us. You are suppose to be supporting and understanding of the people not judgmental, discriminatory and funneling money into anti gay legislation. You are a church, do what a church is suppose to do best. Comfort, help and give guidance. But also forgive.

    December 11, 2012 at 12:52 am |
  11. tffl

    I've had it with the God Squad interjecting themselves into politics and public policy. Just go sit in your halls on Sunday mornings and tell each other that you are all going to heaven and everyone is going to hell, and leave the rest of us alone.

    December 11, 2012 at 12:50 am |
    • Athy

      Great idea! If only they would.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:52 am |
    • montrose

      but the un-God squad is just as vocal; it's called the public square.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:53 am |
    • Fred

      I'm sorry, how do you think this country would have turned out if the founding fathers would have left God, heaven and the thought of religion out of all of their thoughts, writings and speeches. The country would have been worse off overall. Sure there are your fanatics on both ends but what held this country together for most of its volatile beginning was faith in God. Read many of the founding father papers and if think any of these politicians today could even hold a candle to Washington or Adams then you are not as smart as you think you are.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:02 am |
    • Athy

      Where's your proof the country would be worse without religion?

      December 11, 2012 at 1:08 am |
    • Bill

      If you think that's what Christian do in worship services, then you clearly have never walked into a church. It's about love and acceptance .... not hate and condemnation.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:09 am |
    • sam

      No Fred.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:09 am |
    • Observer

      Bill,

      "It's about love and acceptance .... not hate and condemnation."

      So it's NOT churches that are leading the protests against gays and abortion?

      Get serious.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:21 am |
    • GrowUp

      @Fred. Learn a little history before spouting off. Many of the "Founding Fathers" were atheists or at a minimum agnostics. Not your father's Evangelicals by any means. Stop buying into urban myths and get an education.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:25 am |
    • montrose

      calm now, GROW UP. Fred has just as many true believers in the Fathers as you have whatever. No urban legends here.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:32 am |
    • mama k

      Is this the part where we hear someone tell us the importance of Washington's Farewell Address? Or the Mayflower Compact? I smell someone thinking the U.S. was founded on the Bible. Where are they? Let me at 'em.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:36 am |
    • counter

      Tough. Free speech is free speech.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:37 am |
    • mama k

      Here's some urban legend for you. We hear more and more of the influence of Deism on the key founders, who were fed up with the persecution between various fundamental Christians sects that was going on around the time the U.S. government was founded.

      Listen to James Madison, POTUS #4, and the chief architect of the U.S. Constitution & the Bill of Rights (including the 1st Amendment):

      During almost fifteen centuries has the legal establishment of Christianity been on trial. What has been its fruits? More or less in all places, pride and indolence in the clergy; ignorance and servility in the laity; in both, superstition, bigotry, and persecution.

      (A Remonstrance . . to the Virginia General Assembly in 1785.)

      Listen to John Adams, POTUS #2:

      I almost shudder at the thought of alluding to the most fatal example of the abuses of grief which the history of mankind has preserved – the Cross. Consider what calamities that engine of grief has produced! With the rational respect that is due to it, knavish priests have added prostitutions of it, that fill or might fill the blackest and bloodiest pages of human history. "

      (in a letter to Thomas Jefferson, 09/03/1816)

      The United States of America have exhibited, perhaps, the first example of governments erected on the simple principles of nature; and if men are now sufficiently enlightened to disabuse themselves of artifice, imposture, hypocrisy, and superstition, they will consider this event as an era in their history. It will never be pretended that any persons employed in that service had interviews with the gods, or were in any degree under the influence of Heaven, more than those at work upon ships or houses, or laboring in merchandise or agriculture; it will forever be acknowledged that these governments were contrived merely by the use of reason and the senses.

      Thirteen governments [of the original states] thus founded on the natural authority of the people alone, without a pretence of miracle or mystery, and which are destined to spread over the northern part of that whole quarter of the globe, are a great point gained in favor of the rights of mankind.

      (from A Defence of the Constitutions of Government of the United States of America [1787-1788])

      Listen to Ben Franklin:

      Some books against Deism fell into my hands; they were said to be the substance of the sermons which had been preached at Boyle’s Lectures. It happened that they wrought an effect on me quite contrary to what was intended by them. For the arguments of the Deists, which were quoted to be refuted, appeared to be much stronger than the refutations; in short, I soon became a thorough Deist.

      (from his Autobiography)

      Thomas Paine was very Deistic. He witness Quakers being hung in Massachusetts by other Christians:

      I do not believe in the creed professed by the Jewish church, by the Roman church, by the Greek church, by the Turkish church, by the Protestant church, nor by any church that I know of. My own mind is my own church. All national institutions of churches, whether Jewish, Christian or Turkish, appear to me no other than human inventions, set up to terrify and enslave mankind, and monopolize power and profit.

      Thomas Jefferson had his own Deistic version of the Bible.

      Millions of innocent men, women, and children, since the introduction of Christianity, have been burnt, tortured, fined, imprisoned; yet we have not advanced one inch towards uniformity. What has been the effect of coercion? To make one half the world fools, and the other half hypocrites. To support roguery and error all over the earth.

      (from Notes on the State of Virginia)

      Of course Deism holds to the belief of God as the creator of the universe. But many Deists also believed that God did not interfere with the lives of his creation. And many Deists disbelieved in all of the "magic" in the Bible – some of them refuting the Bible and Christianity completely.

      Jefferson, Washington, Adams, Paine, Mason & Madison all witnessed the violent persecution between Christian sects in their home states around the time the government was being established. So it is of no surprise that they needed a secular government and they knew the only way to enforce freedom of religion was to keep religion out of the government as much as possible.

      Listen to James Madison speak about the need for the need to keep religion out of government (Jefferson wasn't the only one to explicitly speak of the separation of church and state):

      Every new & successful example therefore of a perfect separation between ecclesiastical and civil matters, is of importance. And I have no doubt that every new example, will succeed, as every past one has done, in shewing that religion & Govt. will both exist in greater purity, the less they are mixed together.

      The Civil Govt, tho' bereft of everything like an associated hierarchy, possesses the requisite stability and performs its functions with complete success, Whilst the number, the industry, and the morality of the Priesthood, & the devotion of the people have been manifestly increased by the total separation of the Church from the State.

      (from letters to Edward Livingston and Robert Walsh)

      Madison as president vetoed two bills that he believed would violate the separation of church and state. He also came to oppose the long-established practice of employing chaplains at public expense in the House of Representatives and Senate on the grounds that it violated the separation of church and state and the principles of religious freedom. (Library of Congress – James Madison Papers – Detached memorandum, ca. 1823.)

      President John Adams and the U.S. Senate on behalf of the U.S.

      As the Government of the United States of America is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion;

      (from Article 11 of the U.S. treaty ratified with Tripoli in 1797)

      December 11, 2012 at 1:47 am |
    • mama k

      Only it's not urban legend. The key framers were very Deistic.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:50 am |
  12. Joseph

    The Jesus I know said, "that which much is given, much is expected of him."

    December 11, 2012 at 12:49 am |
    • Athy

      How do you know jebus said that?

      December 11, 2012 at 12:54 am |
    • GodFreeNow

      The Taoists and Hindus taught the same thing thousands of years earlier.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:56 am |
    • montrose

      Jesus didn't come to make bad men good. He came to make dead men alive. This is radically different than Taoism and Hinduism. No comparison.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:10 am |
    • sam

      >>He came to make dead men alive

      Zombies are so last season.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:17 am |
    • Athy

      How does he make dead men alive? I want to hear this!

      December 11, 2012 at 1:22 am |
    • montrose

      EPH 2:1-5

      December 11, 2012 at 1:27 am |
    • Observer

      montrose,

      If a Bible passage is too complex for you to understand and condense, no one else will bother looking it up.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:34 am |
    • Athy

      It's just more 2000-year-old bullshit anyway.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:38 am |
    • montrose

      observer- surely someone of your intellect has a bible. LOOK IT UP.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:40 am |
    • montrose

      it beats your 20 minute old bs

      December 11, 2012 at 1:51 am |
  13. GrowUp

    This guy wishes he were half the man with half the courage, strength, conviction and morality of President Obama. Dream on dude. You are a disgrace and have no business chastising Obama.

    December 11, 2012 at 12:41 am |
    • montrose

      this is an opinion.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:44 am |
    • Moonbeam

      Well said! After the outrageous things Romney and Ryan said just to get elected, I can't believe the nerve of this guy.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:05 am |
  14. GrowUp

    This guy purports to respect those who stood up for Jews and blacks when it was not popular because it was the right thing to do. Right to fight discrimination, bigotry snd ignorance in the face of strong headwinds. Yet he obviously doesn't stand up for gays. instead, he patronizes them with "loving thy enemy". What a hypocrite and charlatan. This is why I have no respect for Evangelicals. They are hypocrites hiding behind the robe of Jesus. Shameful and disgusting.

    December 11, 2012 at 12:31 am |
    • sam

      Sadly, the author is having trouble accepting that his article was not well received despite the fact that it seems like such obvious truth to him.

      Feel free to visit his Facebook and avail him of you opinion. It'll likely be deleted.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:34 am |
    • ib42

      Just selling his dumb book. As if we need another brainwashed twit offering unwanted opinions.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:37 am |
    • Courtney

      The article is horrible and very demeaning. The man who wrote this piece, is what is wrong with the religious right wing in this country. I have always been a Christian my entire life, and I do not like how it has been used in politics. I voted for President Obama, who happens to be a good Christian man who loves this country and his family. The only people trying to divide this country are FOX NEWS, the tea party, and some evangelicals. It is just sad.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:53 am |
    • montrose

      hey Courtney – is calling pro-life people EVIL Christian?

      December 11, 2012 at 12:56 am |
    • GodFreeNow

      @montrose, Clearly instead of listening to Courtney's perspective, you've decided to interject something random that you think contradicts her point. I'll answer this question if you don't mind.

      I don't like the simplicity and black and white nature of a word such as "evil," but I will use that word because it fits simply into your vocabulary. If a person tries to take away the right of a woman to abort a baby that is unwanted due to r@pe, inc.est or that may be endangering her life, then yes... those "christians" are evil.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:03 am |
    • sam

      Thanks, Courtney.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:10 am |
    • sam

      Montrose. get help.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:11 am |
    • Bill

      Dear Grow up .... Jesus defended the adulterous woman and prevented her from being stoned .... but then he told her, "No go and sin no more." He loved her and protected her but he did not support her lifestyle. The same can be said regarding Zachias, the crooked tax collector .... he loved him and ate with him but didnt support his lifestyle. The same can be said for the woman at the well, who had had four husbands and was living with a man she wasnt married to.
      Jesus teaches that it IS possible to love the person but not support what they are doing.
      I love my sons ... that doesnt mean i support and agree with everything they do.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:13 am |
    • montrose

      this election wasn't about taking choice away. it was about who should pay for things such as contraception and abortion. Obama painted Republicans as warring against women. He demonized them. So, get off your high horse about taking away choice and the evil Christians.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:23 am |
    • Observer

      montrose,

      It wasn't Obama who made the ignorant statements about r-pe; folders of women; women getting home in time to prepare supper; and opposition to being pro-choice.

      Try again.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:28 am |
    • montrose

      The republican wanted to be clear that every person is precious, even the ones that are the result of rap-e. The media got a hold of this and turned it inside out.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:43 am |
    • GrowUp

      @Bill. Sophistry at best, ignorance at worst (but more likely). How presumptuous and arrogant of you to believe you know what God does or doesn't want and to believe that others give a cr*p about your opinion of them or what they do. I pity your sons having a self-righteous, sanctimonious ignoramus for a father.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:54 am |
    • montrose

      Don't worry, Bill. Ole GrowUp is stringing invectives together because she/he is out of logic. Gotta rage out against the Christians.

      December 11, 2012 at 2:04 am |
    • GrowUp

      @montrose. Uh huh. Immaculate conceptions, people rising from the dead, parting seas, walking on water, invisible beings in the sky watching us and filling out report cards on us, all of mankind forever cursed because a woman ate an apple, samples of all creatures loaded on to a big boat to save life from a planet-wide massive flood, the earth created in 7 days, a woman created from the rib of a man (and without any stem cell research either!) Etc. etc. etc–all quite logical I'm sure. HAHAHAHAHA!

      December 11, 2012 at 2:17 am |
    • montrose

      The reckoning will quiet your insolence.

      December 11, 2012 at 2:23 am |
    • GrowUp

      Don't hold your breath. On second thought, go ahead and hold it.

      December 11, 2012 at 2:28 am |
  15. Saye

    "Biblical view of marriage"? Sir, what bible are you using?

    December 11, 2012 at 12:30 am |
    • Bill

      The new testament supports marriage between one man and one woman. It does not support polygamy.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:14 am |
    • Observer

      Bill,

      Jesus never put gays down in the New Testament, but what do hypocritical Christians care?

      December 11, 2012 at 1:18 am |
    • sam

      Bill, no one cares.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:18 am |
    • montrose

      How does a society say no to sin in a kind way?

      December 11, 2012 at 2:07 am |
  16. maryl1

    I would enjoy reading your article on all the Christians calling President Obama a Marxist Socialist Kenyan; who sent nasty racist emails; who lied and lied and lied about his character and accomplishments. The problem is that President Obama was telling the truth about his opponents.

    December 11, 2012 at 12:25 am |
    • ib42

      Perfect! People who claim they are 'led' by Christianity are terribly boring, and should work with the poor and downtrodden, instead of giving worthless and unsolicited opinions of Mr. Obama.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:35 am |
  17. Rosan

    I believe that there is no power greater than god himself and that jesus came to earth to save us, with this said I support president Obama because he understand the real Americans not the millionaires but the people like me. Working 40+ hours a week trying to make ends meet, and yes i dont receive food stamps or medicare,everithing i have i earn it with hard work and dedication and yes I am a Christian and I have love for god but Obama has god and fairness in his heart I feel that the republican party hides behind religion,as they make ridicules and outrageous claim in he name of god it's disgusting

    December 11, 2012 at 12:21 am |
    • sam

      Preach it.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:23 am |
    • Chris

      "jesus" was a lying fraud just like any other lying preacher today who claims they can heal with magical god given powers and other nonsense. Your "jesus" never existed and only an uneducated idiot believes in fairy tales like that.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:25 am |
    • Chris

      40 hours a week is nothing and "millionaires" are more American and better Americans than you will ever be. They are as real as it gets.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:27 am |
    • Athy

      Well, your attitude is commendable, Rosan. Just get rid of your god delusion and join us.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:30 am |
    • sam

      >>40 hours a week is nothing and "millionaires" are more American and better Americans than you will ever be. They are as real as it gets.

      Chris? Are you really going this way? You sure?

      December 11, 2012 at 12:30 am |
    • Alpa Chino

      Chris asking for a hurting

      December 11, 2012 at 12:31 am |
    • montrose

      his policies have us poised for financial doom. stop thinking with your sentimentality.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:37 am |
    • Chris

      A hurting? I castrate, scalp and skin leftists alive. I specialize in hurting left wingers. It's you who would get hurt...

      December 11, 2012 at 12:38 am |
    • Observer

      Chris,

      "millionaires" are more American and better Americans than you will ever be. They are as real as it gets.

      Like Donald Trump who is spending a fortune in OTHER countries? Like Rush Limbaugh? Like Glenn Beck?

      December 11, 2012 at 12:42 am |
    • David

      So in essence, you are saying money and a job means more to you than the death of millions of unborn children. Unfortunately, millions of other Americans feel the same way. It's the reason we are in the shape we are in. I think President Obama is a very likable man. I also think he is misguided and the fact that millions of women choose to kill their children, and they can also vote, has lead him to try to hold the cross in one hand and the blood of millions of innocent victims in the other. I'm pretty sure it just doesn't work that way.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:42 am |
    • montrose

      Athy is the delusion.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:46 am |
    • Alpa Chino

      Chris

      I make buffalo wings outcho ass

      Mild like because you such a pussy

      December 11, 2012 at 12:46 am |
    • sam

      David, stop being obsessed with what goes on in a woman's plumbing until you grow some of your own.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:47 am |
    • montrose

      SAM – your gender comment is absurd.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:50 am |
    • sam

      Montrose, your vacant skull is absurd.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:12 am |
    • montrose

      @Sam – cool.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:47 am |
  18. twalk

    The guy that wrote this article is laughable. Nothing but spin and bias propaganda.

    December 11, 2012 at 12:18 am |
  19. stephen K

    Who started the ugly?
    And which party majored in ugly?
    Whatever Obama did was paled into insignificance by the right, and groups like Rove's et al

    This is pious BS
    And I say that sincerely
    as a Moderate Christian

    So did Jesus never confront?
    Was it OK to the the GOP run roughshod over America
    working for the rich
    and throwing the poor under the bus?

    Yes, not the best campaign...
    and I do NOT believe the end justifies the means
    but this opinion piece is over the top

    December 11, 2012 at 12:15 am |
    • sam

      I would like to subscribe to your newsletter
      Even if your post
      Is formatted like
      Failed haiku.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:16 am |
    • Paul

      Wow! You guys gonna ride the "it's Bush's fault" pony all the way through the second term too? weak!!!!!

      December 11, 2012 at 12:23 am |
    • sam

      Paul – did you reply to the wrong post, or are you just insane?

      December 11, 2012 at 12:24 am |
    • nvmature

      @Paul Republicans hate to hear the fact: Bush/Cheney created a mess that this nation is still trying to recover from. Obama wasn't running against Romney; he was running against the mess he inherited from Bush/Cheney.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:26 am |
    • montrose

      wth is a moderate Christian?

      December 11, 2012 at 12:39 am |
  20. Siara Delyn

    A classic example of religion being twisted to justify narrow minded, extremist politics. Yuck.

    December 11, 2012 at 12:10 am |
    • twalk

      u got that. Repubturds misuse religion for political agenda that are untruths. Shame on the so called christains.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:20 am |
    • montrose

      Wake up Libs because our country is being radicalized but you wouldn't know it because your too busy building Utopia.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:42 am |
    • Observer

      montrose,

      The most radical people in our country are the religious right who constantly spread lies.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:46 am |
    • montrose

      that's also what was said about the OT prophets.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:48 am |
    • Observer

      montrose

      Every time Christians get embarassed by the nonsense in the OT, they claim it doesn't count. So does the OT count or did most of that baloney get tossed out by Jesus?

      December 11, 2012 at 12:51 am |
    • Athy

      Montrose, it's "you're," not "your." Go retake sixth grade. And stay awake this time.

      December 11, 2012 at 12:58 am |
    • montrose

      Jesus is the fulfillment of the law, thus affirming both of your points.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:00 am |
    • Observer

      montrose,

      So Jesus fulfilled the laws. That's why we don't have to be concerned about people working on the Sabbath just like no Christians are concerned about gays, right?

      December 11, 2012 at 1:08 am |
    • montrose

      jesus is the sabbath. and yes many christians care for gay friends.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:46 am |
    • Observer

      montrose

      "jesus is the sabbath". So when God issued the 10 Commandments, he was actually talking about Jesus?

      Have you actually read the Bible or just point to passages?

      December 11, 2012 at 1:51 am |
    • montrose

      yes, OBY, it's a rather common term called fulfillment.

      December 11, 2012 at 1:53 am |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.