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My Take: An almost chosen nation
In 2009, President Barack Obama was sworn in using the same bible used by former President Abraham Lincoln. The Lincoln bible will make an appearance in this inauguration as well.
January 19th, 2013
10:00 PM ET

My Take: An almost chosen nation

Editor's Note: Joseph Loconte, Ph.D., is an associate professor of history at the King’s College in New York City and the author of The Searchers: A Quest for Faith in the Valley of Doubt.

By Joseph Loconte, Special to CNN

When Barack Obama is publicly sworn in for the second time as president on Monday, he will use two Bibles. One belonged to the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., the other to Abraham Lincoln —two of the most religious figures in American political history. Both men saw clearly the moral contradictions that tore at the fabric of American democratic life. Yet both also believed deeply in the exceptional character of the United States and the spiritual significance of its democratic mission.

In a speech to the New Jersey legislature on his inaugural journey to Washington, February 21, 1861, Lincoln reflected on Trenton’s heroic role in America’s fight for independence:

“I recollect thinking then, boy even though I was, that there must have been something more than common that those men struggled for; that something even more than National Independence; that something that held out a great promise to all the people of the world to all time to come.”

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Lincoln never doubted the universal appeal of the nation’s experiment in self-government, a “promise to all people of the world” that would endure across the centuries. Unlike modern liberals, Lincoln was no cultural relativist: He believed firmly in natural and inalienable rights that belonged to all people, from every corner of the globe, by virtue of their common humanity. Despite the cancer of slavery and racism that had infected the body politic, no nation was more devoted to securing those rights than the United States. Indeed, Lincoln insisted that America had a God-given role in advancing this cause in the world:

“I am exceedingly anxious that this Union, the Constitution, and the liberties of the people shall be perpetuated in accordance with the original idea for which that struggle was made, and I shall be most happy indeed if I shall be an humble instrument in the hands of the Almighty, and of this, his almost chosen people, for perpetuating the object of that great struggle.”

Lincoln’s description of America as an “almost chosen people” captured brilliantly the qualified and uncertain character of the nation’s democracy: deeply and grievously flawed, but nonetheless caught up in the righteous purposes of God. Unlike many of his religious contemporaries, Lincoln stopped short of identifying America as the new Israel; no spiritual covenant between God and the United States could be presumed. Lincoln well knew the capacity of religious zeal to poison our politics. Nevertheless, he insisted that America’s commitment to liberty and equality was consistent with the character and intentions of the Almighty.

Martin Luther King, Jr., a Baptist minister, shared Lincoln’s political theology. In a way that many liberal and secular-minded Americans would now find offensive, King wielded passages and principles from the Bible like an ax to assault the racist assumptions that degraded the lives of millions of African-Americans. Like Lincoln, he appealed to America’s spiritual legacy in order to renew its democratic mission.

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In “Letter from the Birmingham Jail,” King complained that African-Americans had been denied “our constitutional and God-given rights.” He declared that “the goal of America is freedom,” a mandate from heaven itself. Indeed, King saw the hand of God in the political fight to call America back to its founding ideals: “If the inexpressible cruelties of slavery could not stop us, the opposition we now face will surely fail,” he wrote. “We will win our freedom because the sacred heritage of our nation and the eternal will of God are embodied in our echoing demands.”

Modern liberalism scorns the very idea of “the sacred heritage of our nation.” It rejects the view of America as “an almost chosen people,” an exceptional nation devoted to political and religious ideals anchored in a transcendent cause. In this sense, Mr. Obama’s party, the party of liberalism, would not know what to do with a Lincoln or a King.

It is heartening, and symbolically important, that Mr. Obama will be using the Bibles of these two great leaders as he takes the oath of office. It would be more significant, though, if the president found room for their moral vision of the United States in his administration and in his party.

- kramsaycnn

Filed under: Barack Obama • Belief • Politics

soundoff (752 Responses)
  1. kenwaltzer

    Silly piece, full of assertion, no substance. Who says, based on what, modern liberalism does not believe in a sacred heritage? Who believes liberalism (as distinct from some liberals) do not believe in America as an exceptional nation with a special mission? Conservatives like to talk to one another and repeat each others' pieties. That is not the same thing as telling it like it is.

    January 20, 2013 at 10:38 am |
  2. snowboarder

    the ideals of "american exceptionalism" and a nation "chosen by god" are a quaint relic of more supersti tious times.

    January 20, 2013 at 10:38 am |
  3. Tom

    I wish the God haters would stop repeating the same old phrases over and over again and rant in their own corner.

    January 20, 2013 at 10:37 am |
    • sybaris

      I wish the Zeus haters would stop repeating the same old phrases over and over again and rant in their own corner.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:40 am |
    • Origin of Life

      Sorry Tom but

      Evolution wins thumbs up, time for religion to get the hell out of the way !
      Morality is for chimps too go figure !
      Morality: It's not just for humans !
      http://www.cnn.com/2013/01/19/health/chimpanzee-fairness-morality/index.html?hpt=hp_c2

      January 20, 2013 at 10:49 am |
  4. floridamom1

    The fact that those unbelievers spend so much time, energy and nastiness on trying to make religion out to be a farce, is in fact the proof that it is really true. Otherwise, why would they spend so much time yelling and screaming about it? I think they protest too much, which makes their case all the more weak.

    January 20, 2013 at 10:36 am |
    • Ingrid

      You would be wrong, floridamom1. It's just that there are those of us (even EX Christian fanatics like myself) who would like to NOT have your ridiculous, fear-based, HATE-based belief system forced down our throats via legislation. We non-religious folks are just as moral, if not more so, than any hypocrite bible thumper, and we're sick of your self-righteous, heavy-handed means of (as Christians always do) insisting YOUR way is the "only" way. Grow up.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:41 am |
    • sybaris

      By your logic since there are TV programs about UFO's, Big Foot, and Chupacabra then they must be real too.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:42 am |
    • Cedar Rapids

      Protesting about something proves its correct?
      Oh well that's easy....all those protesting against evolution, age of earth being billions of years old etc etc proves its correct, right?

      January 20, 2013 at 11:01 am |
    • Facepalm

      So based on your logic, all those people who fought tooth and nail to end slavery was merely proof that slavery was a good thing? Every destructive idea throughout history has had opposition. That doesn't validate the idea.

      January 20, 2013 at 11:12 am |
  5. squirrel

    Oh dear. Another desperate conservative hit piece. What a wacky bunch. Dr. Loconte, if either President Lincoln or Rev. King were alive today, they would vote for President Obama. Further more, they would've been disgusted at sorry state of the Republican party of today.

    January 20, 2013 at 10:34 am |
  6. Marshele Waddell

    Bravo. Thank you for such a well written article. I will share it with thousands.

    January 20, 2013 at 10:32 am |
  7. Howie76

    Is Kings college even a real college? No!

    January 20, 2013 at 10:29 am |
    • Donna

      King College is in Cabridge, England and New York.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:40 am |
    • Donna

      CaMbridge, that is.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:42 am |
  8. Chiro210

    I'll be surprised if the bible doesn't burst into flames during the ceremony.

    January 20, 2013 at 10:27 am |
    • Howie76

      more likely to happen to you.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:31 am |
    • ted

      and the rapture takes the real christians to outer space?

      January 20, 2013 at 10:36 am |
  9. bobbaloo

    so if you strive to do good, it is only worthwhile if it is under a religous guise? religion is dying. and it is ok. we dont need religion for morality. in 100 years, chirstians will be the majority. most people will laugh at them, im sorry, but it true. civilization is waking up.

    January 20, 2013 at 10:26 am |
    • bobbaloo

      minority, sorry.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:28 am |
    • Howie76

      sorry it will be a nice fairy tale people read to the kids.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:30 am |
    • Tom

      Religion is only dying in your head. You remind me of that dog barking at the moon thinking it would have any effect.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:34 am |
  10. Colin

    Perhaps the three greatest movements in history, which, in the cu.mulative, mark the emergence of the Western World from the Dark Ages, are the Renaissance, the Reformation and the Enlightenment. All three are defined by their rejection of religion and religious dogma in favor of science, free thought and reason.

    If religion (as opposed to morality) was anything other than empty promises meant to sate human insecurities, would we not expect movements TOWARD greater religiosity to be predominant in World history and viewed in a positive light?

    No, the simple minded idiocy reflected in this article – equating morality with the author's Christian religion- is a thing of the past. The Christian sky-fairy is in full retreat. Science and knowledge have flushed it out of all the unknowns it used to inhabit. Our telescopes have driven it back to the Big Bang, our paleontologists back to the origins of life on Earth. It exists now only in the few dark corners science is yet to illuminate. The soft, uncritical mind of the believer is probably the most obstinate.

    January 20, 2013 at 10:22 am |
    • End Religion

      thanks for your thoughtful posts!

      January 20, 2013 at 10:27 am |
    • floridamom1

      And yet, when that sky-fairy as you call him, shows up, people like you will be very sorry they didn't think more clearly or morally when calling him names.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:31 am |
    • Origin of Life

      Evolution wins thumbs up, time for religion to get the hell out of the way
      Morality is for chimps too go figure
      Morality: It's not just for humans
      http://www.cnn.com/2013/01/19/health/chimpanzee-fairness-morality/index.html?hpt=hp_c2

      January 20, 2013 at 10:36 am |
    • OneGodOneBrotherhood

      Very well written, but of course, completly wrong. You may not realize, the more we learn from science, the closer we come to God. Even as science irons out the big bang, they come to understand that something must exist (God) even a split microsecond before the event to act as a catalyst. Also, as you state, with advanced telescopes, astronomers can see the vastness (infinite) of the universe and view the order where once they saw chaos. Eventually science will catch up with what those of us faithfull believe to be true from the given word.

      January 20, 2013 at 11:01 am |
    • Cedar Rapids

      If you want to hold your breath waiting for him to show up floridamom, we won't stop you.

      January 20, 2013 at 11:03 am |
    • Cedar Rapids

      Sorry ogob but science does no such thing.

      January 20, 2013 at 11:04 am |
    • End Religion

      FloridaMom: I thought Florida was the Sunshine State? Why so much doom and gloom? You don't realize that if atheists don't believe in your god, or your god's eternal concentration camp of torture, then the threats of ending up there hold no weight? Your hell scares YOU, not us.

      January 20, 2013 at 11:13 am |
    • End Religion

      @OneGodOneBrotherhood: "the more we learn from science, the closer we come to God."

      The more science learns, the smaller the gap in our ignorance becomes into which god can fit.

      ***
      "...they come to understand that something must exist (God)..."

      Science deals with probability. There is zero evidence for god. As it stands now, god probably doesn't exist. There does exist a chance of a creator, but to say "science is closer to understanding god did it" is simply wrong and displays your ignorance on the matter. "Gawd dun it wiff spellz" is a completely unrespected, non-scientific cheat.

      What is happening is that religion has soundly lost the battle against science. However proponents for religion understand that to survive, an enemy that cannot be defeated must be absorbed then twisted. This is why you see the rise of "creation science" which is a flat out fraud, and other references to "religion and science can co-exist peacefully" or "here's the science of the bible". The bible is anti-science fiction, not science.

      January 20, 2013 at 11:24 am |
  11. NorthVanCan

    "no nation was more devoted to securing the rights (freedom) than the United States" ?
    What? Than why were slaves escaping to Canada ? Do Americans even know their own history?

    January 20, 2013 at 10:21 am |
    • Michael

      The author of this article, if he is still alive in 20 year's time, will pretend that he always supported gay marriage (as did all conservatives!) and will likely also claim that America legalized it before anyone else did. Facts don't matter to people like this... he was cut from the same cloth as Goebbels.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:28 am |
    • 1nd3p3nd3nt

      brazil got rid of slavery before we did : (

      January 20, 2013 at 10:31 am |
  12. Tim Lucas

    The modern Republican Party does not resemble the Republican Party of Lincoln's time, nor does it reflect morality in either a biblical or worldly sense. From indifference to environmental impact (God instructs us to take care of the earth) to lobbying desperately, despite consequences, for the civilian ownership of military-spec assault rifles (God instructs us not to kill) the hypocrisy and arrogance of the American right-wing is disgusting.

    By contrast, the Obama's are a good Christian family, who like all Christians, actually care about people, our planet, and our future. I'm sorry, Mr, Loconte, but you are way off base.

    January 20, 2013 at 10:18 am |
    • floridamom1

      If Mr. Obama actually cared as you say he does, then he would be spending him time removing the debt, signing legislation and working with both sides of congress to accomplish his supposed lofty goals. He also wouldn't waste taxpayer dollars having a grand old time at his 2nd Inauguration and would, instead, use that money to spend down the debt.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:33 am |
    • Rina

      Amen to that!

      January 20, 2013 at 10:36 am |
  13. Silas Botwin

    Thank you for this.This is the single best article posted on CNN, that I have read, in quite some time. Fact based, and well reasoned. A very quality article, and the only thing on CNN that I have seen in years that does not take the standard liberal, excessively secularist out look. Again, thank you, we need more people like you.

    January 20, 2013 at 10:16 am |
    • realbuckyball

      Like we need holes in our heads. The article is drivel.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:18 am |
    • gabe

      You my friend are an idiot.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:21 am |
    • mark ducharme

      His final point is indisputable but wil be vehemently denied by the modern liberal. To not do so would be suicide to thier belief. But to be fair, if they lived in this time they very well might have be persuaded in time to agree with the masses. But I doubt it. It takes time for a cancer to develop. Glad I won't be around for the final stages. Will pray till my dying day for a cure. Maybe Obama care can find one.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:40 am |
    • Cedar Rapids

      Well that's an easy one mark...that final point is very disputable but will be vehemently denied by the modern conservative. They need to convince themselves that you have to believe in order to have morals.

      January 20, 2013 at 11:07 am |
  14. Name*Chedar

    Long live the president of the United States. Long live to our great president Obama and his family.

    January 20, 2013 at 10:11 am |
    • floridamom1

      Yes, the same kind of saying used in a monarchy or a dictator, or a.....free country? Not so much.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:34 am |
    • mark ducharme

      If a bus was to take both of the chuckle brothersto the promised land today, Obamas' Amerika would save 4 years of backwards progression.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:43 am |
    • End Religion

      FlaMom: if you don't find this country free you've never been outside it. What an embarrassment you are for the country...

      January 20, 2013 at 11:28 am |
  15. mr Howdy

    The Founding Fathers, though Christians were also intellectuals FULLY AWARE OF CLASSICAL IDEALS....they knew that a democracy like the one of Athens which though brief produced tremendous advancements in human understanding could create a nation unlike any on Earth. Lincoln too was an intellectual, and when saying something like almost chosen he was alluding in fact to the idea of a free people who though NOT GODLY were still able to advance the cause of humanity.......the principle idea behind this nation is the Greek Olympian Philolosophy which has powered two great civilizations in powering both the Athenian civilization and the Roman civilization if even the Roman tended to commercial applications rather than ideal as was the Athenian.....
    The founding fathers knew very well that belief is a personal matter and ANYONE AT ALL CAN COME TO BELIEVE HE IS CHOSEN ANYONE FROM THE SMARTEST TO THE MOST DISTURBED and that religion can never be at the base of an Olympian Civilization and if we are to survive WE MUST ADHERE TO THOSE OLYMPIAN IDEALS!!! AND ONLY THOSE SAVED THE NATION IN LINCOLNS TIME AND ONLY THOSE SAME IDEALS WILL SAVE OUR NATION AND OUR CIVILIZATION NOW....we live in an OLYMPIAN CIVILIZATION WITH SOME ATHENIAN, AND ROMAN MODIFICATIONS....we allow freedom of religion as did the Greeks and Romans and we allow people to pursue commercial success to enhance their personal freedoms as did the Romans! The past thirty years have allowed a creepy heavily religious ideal to poison the foundation of our nation and if this continues WE ARE DOOMED! Just look at your debt and see what happens when you start believing you are CHOSEN! In the Olympian venue YOU MUST PROVE YOU ARE CHOSEN BY PERFORMANCE!!!! Not because YOU THINK SO!

    January 20, 2013 at 10:09 am |
    • mark ducharme

      Calm down son. Waaay too many Caps. Charging the debt to religion is a jump bigger than Evil Kneivel attempted.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:45 am |
  16. darte

    Ironic a black president is being sworn in using a religion which allowed slavery.

    January 20, 2013 at 10:09 am |
    • SL

      Had you read the article you would see that the author showed how religion was used to negate the idea of slavery, not perpetuate it.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:13 am |
    • Jonathan

      Which religion is that? Judaism? Islam? Christianity?

      January 20, 2013 at 10:17 am |
    • Jeremy

      Actually, it should be noted that that the Methodist, Baptist, and Protestant faiths of the time were all split on the issue, and essentially along the North-South borders. The Catholic church is the exception here. That is why there is still the Southern Baptists and Baptists and it wasn't until over a hundred years after the civil war that the Methodists once again reunited. The religious leaders of the time were certainly not universally opposed to slavery and the slaves who were taught Christianity were done so by preachers who emphasized obedience and humility to their masters because it was the will of God that they be in such a state. Long story short, religions role in ending slavery is not so cut and dry.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:34 am |
    • Cathi

      Simple minds never seem to grasp the difference between what a religion teaches vs. human distortions of such. They are two entirely different things. One needs to be promoted in the genuine sense, the other changed. That's what great leaders have helped us do. We each have to do the same within ourselves.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:41 am |
    • mark ducharme

      Ironic?

      January 20, 2013 at 10:48 am |
    • Jeremy

      No need to name call Cathi. My statement wasn't about the philosophy of Christianity but about what the religious leaders in some areas of the country taught and its congregation followed. Perhaps it would be more accurate to claim that the philosophy of Jesus' teachings were important in ending slavery, but whether the religions founded on that philosophy did is not quite such a simple answer.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:49 am |
  17. Jim

    Great article...I agree, our president and his army of liberals definitely wouldn't know how to handle men of character and morals like Lincoln and Dr. King. You cannot escape the fact that our country was founded on the belief that we are one nation under the Judeo-Christian God. History can't be changed.

    January 20, 2013 at 10:08 am |
    • Colin

      Yes, and one day, we all believed in witches, too. I wish we would finally shed religion, the last of our supernatural beliefs.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:10 am |
    • Origin of Life

      Evolution wins hands down, time for religin to get the hell out of the way ok

      January 20, 2013 at 10:21 am |
    • gabe

      moron.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:22 am |
    • Jeff

      " handle men of character and morals like Lincoln "

      You do know that many of Lincoln's flaws were hidden from the public because information wasn't as available as it is today. Do you think leaving men on the battlefield to die because they didn't want the numbers reported so he could get elected was moral? Lincoln wasn't perfect.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:24 am |
    • floridamom1

      Like I said before, when the Lord comes again, those who call him names will probably want to change their mind and apologize.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:35 am |
    • Ingrid

      Amen to THAT, Colin!

      January 20, 2013 at 10:36 am |
    • Rina

      Jim – you need to read a little history yourself. You're an idiot.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:38 am |
    • Jeremy

      Jim- I believe that many of the founders would identify as Judeo-Christians, I truly do.. The problem is, they believed in a Judeo-Christian God that thought that slavery was acceptable and that African Americans were 3/5 human and considered property. If a self-proclaimed Christian today were to believe such things, I would have a hard time believing that they actually believed in Christ's teachings. Their idea of what it means to be Christian has changed dramatically within the last 250 years, much less the last couple thousand.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:43 am |
    • mark ducharme

      To the atheist below. If their is no value in belief in God than why are so many atheist on prozac? Go ahead, admit you are. It's because everyone is scared S–t less of dying and if you are lucky enough to believe in something that is impossible to believe in with out blind faith, you know you are going to die someday. And it scares the s__t out of you.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:54 am |
    • midwest rail

      mark, when did they begin tracking prozac use by religious belief ? I'm sure you can post a link to that study, right ?

      January 20, 2013 at 10:58 am |
    • Jeremy

      Mark- I"m not sure if your comment was directed at me or not. If it was I'm not sure how to respond. I'm in no way attacking the concepts of belief or faith. I'm simply pointing out how the religions that follow Christ's philosophy, or any philosophy for that matter, have changed over time, and for the better frankly. As far as prozac is concerned, I think that depression is a very serious mental health issue and should not be implied as a weakness on the part of any individual, regardless of their beliefs.

      January 20, 2013 at 11:12 am |
  18. Hamilton

    What a sick, vicious nation, you will reap what you sow......

    January 20, 2013 at 10:07 am |
  19. Rob

    Arrogant of them to even assume that religious nuts have some kind of claim on MORALITY...So pretentious and preposterous. Religion is a plague we must eradicate.

    January 20, 2013 at 10:06 am |
    • SB

      There are those that attempted to eradicate religion. Mao, Stalin, Hitler spring to mind and that in just the 20th century. Been tried before and the results have always, always been horrible. Would rather not go through that again. Religion has its faults for sure but governments resting on man's ideals have a really bad track record. In fact...even with religion man has always spun the original concept of God into something that only fuels and drives man's desires and not the desires of God. Man can take everything and spin it to his desires. The result is always short of what God originally intended. Don't let man's twisting of God's laws keep you from delving into and searching for what God really desires from man. You short-sell yourself if you pander to men's ideas.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:18 am |
    • Ingrid

      Well stated, Rob.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:37 am |
    • Cedar Rapids

      Hitler was a catholic who claimed he was doing god's will in killing the Jews. He never tried to eradicate religion.

      January 20, 2013 at 11:14 am |
  20. HR

    The president should only be allowed to be sworn in over a book of logic...not magic.

    January 20, 2013 at 9:58 am |
    • JJ

      Call it what you will, but the supernatural by definition doesn't necessarily follow logic; or at least any "logic" that is comprehendable to us. Ants don't understand calculus, but it's surely a real thing. Know your limitations. There is a reason why you felt so compelled to comment as you did.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:10 am |
    • Jim

      That was the book our nation was founded on. You can't change that. And your logic alone can answer how but never why, and in turn will leave you hungry and empty inside. The God of the Bible loves you HR.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:12 am |
    • realbuckyball

      Historical accident does not dictate the future. The ancient angry deity, (the god of the armies, called Yahweh, does not exist, so he "loves" no one. If he existed he would have prevented Aurora and Sandy Hook. He is a figment of ancient nomads immaginations, and there is not a shred of evidence for it's existence. Too bad. There is no Easter Bunny. Sorry if that comes as a shock. Grow up.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:22 am |
    • Michael

      Jim,

      Read the Treaty of Tripoli sometime. Our founding fathers spelled out quite clearly that the government of our nation was NOT founded upon Christianity. Theocrats tout that bit of historical revisionism to suit their own agenda and to try to destroy the liberty our founding fathers fought so hard for. And I'll add that while writing on the subject of religion, Thomas Jefferson once wrote:

      "It is error alone which needs the support of government. Truth can stand by itself."

      January 20, 2013 at 10:23 am |
    • SL

      I'd like to hear your theory then Buckyball. My guess it is more imaginative than that of our ancient predecessors you speak of. I would be absolutely certain if I were you. It always makes me wonder when people who don't believe in something feel so compelled to adamantly express that disbelief...

      January 20, 2013 at 10:31 am |
    • Michael

      SL,

      Everyone believes in something, and it is very self serving (not to mention dishonest) of you to suggest otherwise. Indeed, you contradict yourself by saying you'd like to hear his "theory," which he wouldn't have if he lacked beliefs. Keep in mind that belief does not begin and end with your precious dogma.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:40 am |
    • floridamom1

      realbuckyball, you obviously don't understand what the world is all about, why it was created, and how God interacts in it. In fact, God allows bad things to happen. We are here to make choices. Choices between good and evil. Some of us make wrong choices. That's why there is the atonement of Christ. But, to think that God doesn't exist because bad happens is nonsense. Bad happens because people are bad. And God welcomes home into his presence those people who are killed by those who have been bad. You can't make decisions based on inaccurate information.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:41 am |
    • Michael

      floridamom1 made a post full of insubstantial preaching and ended her post with

      "You can't make decisions based on inaccurate information."

      Oh, the irony.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:45 am |
    • SL

      Mikey ol' pal, I didn't say bucky didn't believe in anything...interesting that you deduced that from my comment... I said "something", that something being a diety as gathered by his/her post (in addition to the Easter Bunny). My comment was addressed at the fact that many people adamantly assert their disbelief in something. I find that interesting is all. I don't believe in the Easter Bunny either, but I rarely blog about it. Read deeply before replying this time if you so choose.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:48 am |
    • Michael

      SL,

      Don't backpedal. If you don't stand by something, you should refrain from writing it in the first place instead of leaping through hoops to try to justify it when called out on how asinine it is.

      Yeah, "something" doesn't really mean "something" now, it means an unspecified deity, you just chose to say "something" instead of "people who don't believe in god(s)" ...for whatever silly reason is fathomable only to yourself.

      And I'll add that if grown adults were rabidly insisting that the Easter Bunny is true, were demanding that you believe in him, and were trying to get such belief passed off as fact in public schools, you'd probably have plenty to say about it.

      January 20, 2013 at 10:55 am |
    • Cedar Rapids

      So floridamom, do tell us why the world was created.

      January 20, 2013 at 11:13 am |
    • HR

      Just about everything christians use is a copout. Your magic man allows bad things to happen: copout. Your magic man decides what happens to you: copout and lack of personal responsibility. Using the example of an insect not understanding calculus demonstrates your ability to use any logic to describe your magic man. Why? No logic or rational thought is involved. Simple human fear created your religion, and now your religion has murdered countless millions. The president should only be allowed to be sworn in on a book of logic.

      January 20, 2013 at 12:12 pm |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.