home
RSS
March 9th, 2013
10:00 PM ET

Chris Tomlin, king of the sing-along

By Eric Marrapodi and Tom Foreman, CNN
[twitter-follow screen_name='EricCNNBelief'] [twitter-follow screen_name='tomforemancnn']

Baltimore (CNN) - The capacity crowd at the 1st Mariner Arena in Baltimore is bouncing in unison to the most widely sung music on the planet today. The catwalk above the arena is shaking.

Chris Tomlin grabs the microphone and asks the crowd if they’re ready.

"I feel alive, on God's great dance floor!" He leads the packed venue in singing and jumping.

Tomlin is out touring the country with his latest studio album, “Burning Lights.” In January, it topped the Billboard 200 charts. But unlike those who've enjoyed performances by Beyonce, Johnny Cash and a host of others who've played this Baltimore hall, after these fans stream out the doors they will have ample opportunity to sing Tomlin's songs again, as one.

That is the secret to Tomlin’s success – the stage, the lights, the band - aren’t about him. As lively as his shows are, the point is not to get you inside the doors. The point is to get you singing in church.

“I strive for trying to write something that people can sing, that people want to sing, and that people need to sing,” Tomlin explained before the show.

Tomlin is the undisputed king of worship music, a genre of Christian music sung on Sunday mornings all across the world and increasingly played on Christian radio stations. The music is simple, devotional and easy on the ears.

Follow the CNN Belief Blog on Twitter

“We would say that Chris is the most prolific songwriter in the United States now, in this past decade,” said Howard Rachinski, CEO of Christian Copyright Licensing International, the company that tracks what music is used in churches around the world.

In 2012, CCLI paid out $40 million to artists and musicians, and Tomlin got a healthy slice of that pie. Churches around the world used 128 songs he wrote or co-wrote last year, Rachinski said.

CCLI estimates that every Sunday in the United States, between 60,000 and 120,000 churches are singing Tomlin’s songs. By extrapolating that data, Rachinski says, “our best guess would be in the United States on any given Sunday, 20 to 30 million people would be singing Chris Tomlin's songs.”

In their last two reporting periods, Tomlin had the No. 1 most-sung song and five of the top 25.

Search YouTube for "How Great is Our God" or "Amazing Grace (My Chains Are Gone)." Black, white, Asian, big churches, small ones are all belting out Tomlin songs. A lot.

For perspective, consider Tomlin’s musical success against one secular counterpart. In 2012, Katy Perry's record sales dwarfed Tomlin’s, but Billboard reported her songs were played 1.4 million times on the radio. Using CCLI’s low-end calculation, Tomlin’s songs were played 3.12 million times in churches.

Growing up Tomlin

Chris Tomlin was reared in Grand Saline, Texas, heavily influenced by country music. His dad taught him to play the guitar.

“I learned all country music - Willie Nelson, and Johnny Cash, all those kind of guys. Those are what my dad played and I played. And I played at my church as well,” Tomlin said.

Tomlin went to college to study sports medicine. “I just didn't know the music would take me here. I loved it and I was getting opportunities to go play, and when I say go play I was starting to write songs of worship even (as) a young kid. I didn't know really what worship music was, what a worship leader was, any of that. I didn't know any of those terms,” he said.

Today, at 40 years old, he is the artist most associated with worship music.

While in college he began singing and writing in earnest. As a senior, he said, he was getting invitations to lead the music for Christian conferences with 10,000 students.

He knew his music was resonating with crowds when he got a call from EMI Publishing after his song “We Fall Down,” which was released in 1998, starting being  played in churches.

“I was just writing songs for the church and from there they just started taking off.”

The compositions are considerably different from pop music. They are simpler, and he takes pains to write them that way.

“I'm thinking as that comes out of my heart as a song of response, I'm trying to think, how can I form this so that everybody, people who are tone deaf, who can't clap on two and four, how can I form this song so they can sing it, so that it is singable?”

Part of that process comes from his love of country music, the simplicity of that music and the stories those songs tell. His goal is to write songs that communicate what people would like to say to God.

“Now, that doesn't happen all the time. I mean, I write so many songs that you never hear because they are not any good.”

Tomlin is the worship pastor at Passion City Church in Atlanta. He leads worship there twice a month and beta tests all his new songs on the congregation. Tomlin is also a major draw as the worship leader of the Passion Conferences, a series of Christian conferences around the world. In January, the conference packed out the Georgia Dome in Atlanta with 60,000 college-age students. Billboard magazine noted the conference helped push up pre-sales of Tomlin’s latest CD.

His songs are so sought-after that, even before they're released on CD, they start showing up in CCLI’s online database.

“His songs have probably had the most immediate impact on churches that we have seen in history,” Rachinski said. “Even before you get to street release [of a CD], churches are already networked and engaged with his songs.”

Don’t look for a crossover

Other contemporary Christian musicians, as the music industry designates them, have crossed over to mainstream pop with some success. Tomlin said he has no designs on making that leap.

He also doesn’t need the money. Over the course of his career he’s sold 4.2 million albums, had 6 million digital downloads, a number of sold-out tours, and of course, the copyright royalties.

Tomlin said money isn't what motivates him to write and perform.

“I feel like I have a responsibility,  that God has given me a gift to write songs for his church that people listen to and that people are coming to expect now,” he said. “When I make a record I feel that responsibility that worship leaders, churches are going to say, 'Hey, are these some new songs we can sing in our church?' And I don't take that lightly, and I don't go, ‘Oh let's go do something else fun.’”

CNN’s Belief Blog: The faith angles behind the biggest stories

“I haven't invented any new instruments, I haven't created new chords that no one has ever played. I play the same chord that every band plays, we play the same instruments up there, the melodies are melodies. The difference to me in the music is that I ask that God's presence be on it and that people, when they sing these songs, sense that God does something.”

The spotlight is on Tomlin even more than ever after starting the year a top the Billboard charts. As he tours the country at bigger and bigger venues, he would prefer to step out of the spotlight, away from the microphone, and let everyone else sing.

“People would be mad that they paid for a ticket for that. So I do that just occasionally, but that is what I love.”

He said the night before, at the Theater at Madison Square Garden, he took as much time as he could to step back and let everyone else sing.

“It was just so beautiful, because I feel like it says something. It's not just like, ‘Hey, listen to me sing.’ This is all of us together. I think when you step back from the mic and it is not about you - and yeah, the light may be on you, but this is about all of us singing. This is about a bigger story, it's about a greater story. It's about a greater name than my name. My name is on the ticket, but this is about a greater name.”

CNN's Oliver Janney, Chris Turner, and Dan Merica contributed to this post.

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Christianity • Music

soundoff (1,754 Responses)
  1. justsane

    never heard of the man. never heard of his music. i trust that if he's not in it for the money, that he's taking the hefty amount that he's making and giving it to charities to help the poor and sick; to do god's work.

    March 10, 2013 at 11:18 am |
  2. gager

    Never heard of him or his music. He'll pass into obscurity.

    March 10, 2013 at 11:13 am |
    • Unintelligent Designer

      Did you not read the article or see the video? The guy is a marketing genius who has dominated the niche demographic of Christian music. The "Faith + 1" episode of South Park was modeled after this guy.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:18 am |
    • John P. Tarver

      only 2 chords and easy to follow.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:21 am |
    • Nietodarwin

      So true unintelligent designer. He must be a man of some reason, he took the blueprint from normal rockers. Maybe we should start a band called "The atheists" (Well, I guess "Blind Faith" already covered that joke.)
      (By the way, I get the joke of your screen name, but you are too smart for that moniker)

      March 10, 2013 at 11:24 am |
  3. 1nd3p3nd3nt

    she was a fast machine
    she kept her motor clean
    she was the best damn woman that i've ever seen

    March 10, 2013 at 11:12 am |
    • Dave Johnson

      🙂

      March 10, 2013 at 11:31 am |
  4. JAD

    Tomlin is a great example of the downward spiral in Christian music today. His knack for "writing" banal lyrics – strung together into incoherent whole songs – together with imitation vanilla chords and melodies somehow passes as real church music. While Tomlin indeed gets it right with his point, "It's not about me", the environment in which he performs and the audience gets hyped up like a rock concert misses the true point of worshiping Jesus (see that "God – dance floor" lyric).

    If Tomlin wrote songs that were more steeped in biblical doctrine instead of passing off super-simple one-liners with the same chord, I guarantee that he would not garner as much press, praise or money as he has. The masses don't want that. The article pitches the idea that Tomlin is willing to give the audience what they want. And to a large degree, that's a shame.

    March 10, 2013 at 11:12 am |
    • clarity

      Well, times are hard. I suppose over the long run, a purchase of one of his CD's could save some some $$ for some people for Lunesta / Ambien prescriptions.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:16 am |
    • lol??

      Maybe some ol' lost beer drinking songs will be found. Anybody use the "99 bottles of beer on the wall" music"?? Perchance even US Army basic training marching tunes could be used.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:48 am |
  5. jonat

    These songs came from the "unchurched movement" that placed rock bands up near the pulpit and saw the clergy take a back seat. It's all about getting folks that wouldn't attend in the pews. It's feel good religion that lacks any substance and it's the main reason I found no reason to attend. I now

    March 10, 2013 at 11:08 am |
    • Nietodarwin

      Xstians stole the x-mas tree gig from the pagans, and as soon as they saw rock n roll wasn't going away they incorporated that into their brainwashing scheme as well. They do have a problem with the internet though, non-believers can speak freely of evidence and reason without fear of being murdered by the "faithful" who are so sure that there is a "god" they are willing to send you to meet him forthwith as opposed to admitting they have NO SUCH EVIDENCE for their deluded belief. Mental illness and religion make people DANGEROUS.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:19 am |
  6. Blue

    The replies to this article have more than convinced me, as a former non-believer, that there is not one shred of credibility to the new atheist movement.

    Why are the foaming-at the mouth angry atheists coming out of woodworks to bash and mock and ridicule believers? Is it because of an article exposing religious intolerance, religious hatred, suppression of rights etc – the things they usually claim gets them so angry?

    Nope.

    It's an article about a Christian songwriter whose singing songs of praise and love and the many people who are enjoying his music.

    Atheists can try and lie about it and convince themselves as much as they can that this is not true, but at the end of the day nothing can hide the ice-cold bitterness of their hearts and incensed rage at anything that does not line-up with their worldview. "REASON" and "LOGIC" are their endlessly ironic mantra.

    I'm not sure if it's religious people, or atheist who need to wake up from this hate-filled, obsessive delusion they are under. Judging by this article, it's the latter.

    March 10, 2013 at 11:03 am |
    • John P. Tarver

      Athiests are angry that science has moved on from the nonsense they believe in and Christianity is still here.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:06 am |
    • ..

      It doesn't take long for Tarver to start spouting his vast "wealth" of knowledge. But as soon as it is about anything tangible he inevitably will fail when asked for supporting evidence for his ramblings.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:10 am |
    • Tom, Tom, the Other One

      I think you are imagining that people are more attached, in an emotional sense, to what they say here than they actually are. Basically it's just a pleasant diversion to get at what believers believe and why they believe. The real fight is elsewhere and the tools for winning it aren't venting and invective, or even frank debate over starkly different positions. Unfounded belief has to be unraveled carefully through education, and its effects have to be blunted by holding our system of government and protections to proper standards

      March 10, 2013 at 11:17 am |
    • MagicPanties

      The only anger I see is in believer posts like yours.

      Atheists are much more likely to use reason, sarcasm and humor.

      Oh, and my invisible pink unicorn is praying that you get a clue.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:26 am |
    • Saving the earth,one pithy comment at a time

      Sorry for the trouble.Perhaps,if the atheists just stopped and agreed with you,you would feel better.Not going to happen.Is it reasonable to believe the Koran is the true word of god and all non-believers must covert or be eliminated?If you do NOT believe this,and billions do-why not?Follow this line of REASON and maybe you can begin to understand what atheists think about ALL religions.At some time in your life you may want to have a civil conversation with a flash and blood atheist.You will find him/her to be a caring and very interesting person...or not.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:46 am |
    • Melissa

      Why? Because we are sick to death of being talked to the way we are by religious people. They are the ones without credibility, and they are getting their ignorance and arrogance thrown right back in their faces. And frankly, its about time. Atheists don't care what these people believe, just so long as these people would learn to stop trying to spread it.

      March 10, 2013 at 12:36 pm |
  7. Gallup

    This article lacks perspective. Far more people have heard tunes by Bach, Mozart, and Beethoven than all of these so-called Christian songwriters combined. These types of stories about so-called Christian songwriters get pitched to the media because the reality is that Christianity is losing its numbers of believers worldwide. It's a slow, but steady decline, so Christian churches are desperate to pitch any kind of positive news stories that they can conjure up to try to distract people from the facts. The music of these so-called Christian songwriters is simple and appeals to a small slice of the pie, almost entirely within just one of 200 countries in the world. That's fine. If you are one of the few listening to this music and it is the only kind of music that your mind is able to process or appreciate, that's fine. But the reach of such music is actually very limited compared to the major classical composers, whose tunes have been heard by billions in all 200 countries - and over centuries now. CNN ought to put things in perspective before sensationalizing a minor songwriter in the manner chosen in this article.

    March 10, 2013 at 11:02 am |
    • ajburne

      Great perspective...and i agree, this article lacks it. Not sure why you keep saying "so-called" Christians though? And the reason these songs are easy, as this article and Tomlin both states, is so that anyone can sing them. In the musical worship setting, leading songs that are difficult for people to sing is distracting from the reason Christians are even singing in the first place. Just my thoughts...

      March 10, 2013 at 11:06 am |
    • Gallup

      I never said "so-called Christians." And there is plenty of classical music that is not difficult for even children to sing.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:14 am |
    • mikeprescott84

      I know what you're saying but the article was talking about singing songs not hearing songs and the number of people that this type of music is reaching is increasing, not decreasing. It isn't my type of music but it seems fairly small minded of you to assume that the people who like this are so backwards that this is the "only kind of music that their minds are able to process or appreciate." I'm sure there are plenty of people who appreciate classical music or in fact many different kinds of and this kind of music as well.

      Two other things:

      Firstly you did say "So-called Christian"

      Secondly although church attendance is in decline in the US you're waaay off the mark about global Christianity which is still growing at a serious rate.

      So, er, check your "facts" mate 😉

      March 10, 2013 at 11:27 am |
    • Gallup

      I never said "so-called Christians" with an "s," which is what I was false accused of earlier the first time, and then again the second time. I also did not "assume" anything; I used the word "if" at the beginning of that sentence, which is a conditional statement, not an assumption. What I was referring to was "so-called Christian songwriters." Many songwriters and composers happen to be Christians, but they are generally not referred to as "Christian songwriters" the way that so-called Christian songwriters, such as the one featured in this CNN article, are.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:40 am |
  8. John

    I've been a Chris Tomlin fan for years. I spent a few years in the worship ministry and always ended up using most of his songs because HE GETS IT. He sets the table for what worship is. You can all go back and forth justifying your faith or lack of faith, but you cant get away from what TRUTH is. Christ is very real and people like Chris Tomlin were put here to demonstrate that fact through giving us music that reflects and tunes in to what our faith is all about.

    March 10, 2013 at 11:01 am |
    • Nietodarwin

      I've been a Beatles fan for years, I like all their songs, but I really love how outspoken and rude John Lennon was because he GETS IT!!!!!!!.
      Christianity will go. It will vanish and shrink. I needn't argue with that; I'm right and I will be proved right. We're more popular than Jesus now; I don't know which will go first – rock and roll or Christianity. (John Lennon)

      March 10, 2013 at 11:08 am |
    • Just a John

      John
      Any idea why this guy has not been able to break into the main stream of pop singing?

      March 10, 2013 at 11:10 am |
    • Unintelligent Designer

      Just a John, surprised the answer isn't obvious. "Purity" doesn't sell well to the mainstream.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:13 am |
    • Melissa

      Christianity has already started going poof. Its only a matter of time.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:18 am |
    • edlada

      Ummmm, yeah. Right.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:36 am |
  9. John P. Tarver

    A century after Einstein cancelled the big bang and 40 years after Geology falsed Darwin's origin of species, People need something to believe in. These songs are well for the Souls that seek the Lord.

    March 10, 2013 at 11:00 am |
    • Nietodarwin

      Mommy and Daddy, I'm failing biology. The other students laugh at me and make fun of me and call me "That creationist kid" The teacher says that evolution is THE FOUNDATION of modern biology. Why did you brainwash me with the bible? Now I can't get into college.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:04 am |
    • Unintelligent Designer

      I'm going to make a prediction. People will call out your lies and you will justify your lies with other, completely unrelated lies.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:05 am |
    • lol??

      College is a gud place to lose your future with that mortgage.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:07 am |
    • ajburne

      @nietodarwin – my 4 degrees, (2 masters and one doctoral) along with my Christian faith, disagree.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:08 am |
    • ajburne

      well said John

      March 10, 2013 at 11:09 am |
    • sqeptiq

      Random word generator bot. Nothing real to discuss...move along folks.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:14 am |
    • Unintelligent Designer

      ajburne, I'm guessing you don't come here much. It won't take long until you distance yourself from any and all knowledge of JPT. And if you don't, then I seriously doubt you have the degrees you claim.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:15 am |
    • ShawnDH

      Only morally weak, intellectually lazy people need to believe ancient Middle Eastern fairy tales are real. It's really very sad.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:16 am |
    • lol??

      SDH and you believe in and believe modern fairies too much.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:28 am |
    • John P. Tarver

      ajburne- If you present peer reviwed modern biology to these athiests and then apply the sientifiic method to the conclusions, these barely high school educated athiests go completely buggy.

      John P. Tarver, MS/PE

      March 10, 2013 at 11:33 am |
  10. JJ

    I just love the South Park episode where little atheist Cartman comes up with a get rich quick scheme by putting together a Christian rock band. He takes popular songs, replaces the word "love" with "jesus" and automatically it's a new song that Christians just lap up. He makes a fortune off all the gullible Christians. It's so funny and the episode just nails it. Google it and watch it.

    March 10, 2013 at 11:00 am |
    • Randy

      Internet troll. Get a life.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:19 am |
  11. LP

    South Park, the "Faith + 1" episode. That's all you need to know, really . . . LOL!

    March 10, 2013 at 10:57 am |
    • JJ

      LOL...you beat me by 3 minutes.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:01 am |
  12. donna

    *YAWN*

    March 10, 2013 at 10:55 am |
    • Nietodarwin

      Jesus is Bored!!!!!!!!! (and boring)
      BRAISE THE LORD!!!!!!!!!!!!! (and serve with veggies) "This is my body,this is my blood, this is the salad"

      March 10, 2013 at 10:59 am |
    • Unintelligent Designer

      Beat a Dead Horse Sunday on CNN's Belief Blog article post.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:01 am |
  13. whoblackmailedpope

    Mission Unaccomplished

    Peter Van Buren, Nation of Change, March 9, 2013

    " March 20 will mark the tenth anniversary of the Iraq War, but by invading Iraq, the U.S. did more to destabilize the Middle East than we could possibly have imagined at the time. In the bigger picture, the world is also a far more dangerous place than it was in 2003. Having somehow turned much of Islam into a foe, Washington has essentially assured itself of never-ending crises that it stands no chance whatsoever of winning. In this sense, Iraq was not an aberration, but the historic zenith and nadir for a way of thinking that is only now slowing waning....

    March 10, 2013 at 10:53 am |
    • lol??

      The Diverse Beast is just doin' its job.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:04 am |
  14. Nietodarwin

    We "nones' are growing in number every day, and the comments from non-believers trying to SAVE xstians from their delusions grows every day too. Keep it up, I know I'm not the only one that was raised in "faith" and was "born again" into reason. Besides, being atheist is patriotic, we are a secular nation.

    “Countries with a high percentage of nonbelievers are among the freest, most stable, best-educated, and healthiest nations on earth. When nations are ranked according to a human-development index, which measures such factors as life expectancy, literacy rates, and educational attainment, the five highest-ranked countries - Norway, Sweden, Australia, Canada, and the Netherlands - all have high degrees of nonbelief. Of the fifty countires at the bottom of the index, all are intensly religious. The nations with the highest homicide rates tend to be more religious; those with the greatest levels of gender equality are the least religious. These associations say nothing about whether atheism leads to positive social indicators or the other way around. But the idea that atheists are somehow less moral, honest, or trustworthy have been disproven by study after study.”
    _ Greg Graffin

    March 10, 2013 at 10:53 am |
    • lol??

      The numbers rackets aren't new.

      March 10, 2013 at 10:59 am |
    • Science

      Hey Nietodarwin the word is out about the nones thanks for the tag – along Peace

      Hey bethany/chad cause is non casual agent religious BS

      Hey Bobie and As-stin Chad/rachel l4h fred Robert Brown loony bethany etc etc All creationists !!!

      Was the bible around back then ?

      Human Y Chromosome Much Older Than Previously Thought

      Mar. 4, 2013 — The discovery and analysis of an extremely rare African American Y chromosome pushes back the time of the most recent common ancestor for the Y chromosome lineage tree to 338,000 years ago. This time predates the age of the oldest known anatomically modern human fossils.

      http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130305145821.htm

      No god(s) needed or required to graduate from public schools in the US

      Remember : Adam had to POKE himself hard with his OWN BONE to create Eve.

      Peace

      March 10, 2013 at 11:00 am |
    • reyp

      http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_are_the_percentages_of_religions_in_Norway
      Your belief in atheism has brought more lies to your understanding. Your comment is field with lies. the countries you mention are countries who have sent great numbers of missionaries. check your facts before you make mindless comments

      March 10, 2013 at 11:18 am |
  15. wowzah

    @end religion...read Romans 10 6-7 you are not the judge of who goes to heaven or hell.
    RELIGION. Americanized with bigotry, selfishness, no compassion (only for their own..that looks like them) Try being a disciple not religious.

    March 10, 2013 at 10:52 am |
    • End Religion

      I am the judge of who goes to hell, and guess what? Pack your bags, asshole!

      March 10, 2013 at 11:46 am |
    • Science

      wowzah what did you say for the truth read daily blog below.

      http://religion.blogs.cnn.com/2013/02/09/my-take-a-word-to-christians-be-nice/comment-page-75/#comments

      March 10, 2013 at 11:54 am |
  16. Carl

    I wonder why CNN bothers to allow comments on this blog? Every blog entry results in just another endless round of faith-bashing in the comments, with only a vanishingly small percentage having anything to do with the entry itself. So utterly tiresome and pointless.

    March 10, 2013 at 10:51 am |
    • JJ

      It gives non-Christians a place to fight back against the centuries of abuse and persecution that we suffer from you jack-booted Christians who retard human advancement.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:05 am |
    • PANDORA

      CNN posts these "Belief" articles as bait for the most vile anti-Christian messages. Kind of like bread and circuses for the masses to consume.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:10 am |
    • sqeptiq

      It is through the widest possible expression of ideas that the best and worst of them are identified. Read Thomas Jefferson and you will see that when ideas contend, the most reasonable eventually survive and the others fade away.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:20 am |
  17. Science

    Hey Dan Thanks for the tag along Peace

    Hey bethany/chad cause is non casual agent religious BS

    Hey Bobie and As-stin Chad/rachel l4h fred Robert Brown loony bethany etc etc All creationists !!!

    Was the bible around back then ?

    Human Y Chromosome Much Older Than Previously Thought

    Mar. 4, 2013 — The discovery and analysis of an extremely rare African American Y chromosome pushes back the time of the most recent common ancestor for the Y chromosome lineage tree to 338,000 years ago. This time predates the age of the oldest known anatomically modern human fossils.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130305145821.htm

    No god(s) needed or required to graduate from public schools in the US

    Remember : Adam had to POKE himself hard with his OWN BONE to create Eve.

    Peace

    March 10, 2013 at 10:50 am |
  18. dyno8

    Good for Chris! for soaking the minds of many people with love, peace and faith.

    March 10, 2013 at 10:48 am |
    • Nietodarwin

      Soaking the minds and leaving people wet on the brain. Soaking society in blood and hatred.
      "“I am now convinced that children should not be subjected to the frightfulness of the Christian religion [...]. If the concept of a father who plots to have his own son put to death is presented to children as beautiful and as worthy of society's admiration, what types of human behavior can be presented to them as reprehensible?”
      _ Ruth Hurmence Green, The Born Again Skeptic's Guide to the Bible

      March 10, 2013 at 10:56 am |
    • ajburne

      well said dyno

      March 10, 2013 at 11:02 am |
    • End Religion

      we don't need teens inebriated on imaginary goody-goody pap. Send them to SXSW in Austin and let'm rock out in a techno orgy instead. It builds character.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:49 am |
  19. Nietodarwin

    What personal sacrifice for "the kingdom of heaven" was Jesus talking about when he told his disciples, "He that is able to receive it, let him receive it"? CASTRATE YOURSELF. (Matthew 19:11-12) "But he said unto them, All men cannot receive this saying, save they to whom it is given. For there are some eunuchs, which were so born from their mother's womb: and there are some eunuchs, which were made eunuchs of men: and there be eunuchs, which have made themselves eunuchs from the kingdom of heaven's sake. He that is able to receive it, let him receive it." (Matthew 19:11-12) The Scholar's Version has: "There are castrated men who castrated themselves because of Heaven's imperial rule. If you are able to accept this (advice), do so."

    March 10, 2013 at 10:48 am |
    • lol??

      He was talkin' to YOU. Have at it.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:02 am |
    • Seyedibar

      Some of the many messianic cults that the myths of Jesus is based on were self-castrators,and most required the priests to be eunechs.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:29 am |
    • .

      Ah, good old lol??. Gaping mouth of the Westies.

      March 10, 2013 at 11:43 am |
  20. BIgD

    Tim Minchin > any christianist pop-songster

    Here's how to write a worship song in 5 min or less:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=GhYuA0Cz8ls#!

    March 10, 2013 at 10:44 am |
    • Dan

      Excellent. I need to get to work. I'll have a CD ready by tomorrow.

      March 10, 2013 at 10:51 am |
    • clarity

      LMAO – excellent.

      March 10, 2013 at 10:56 am |
    • Unintelligent Designer

      You really shouldn't put bad ideas in my head.

      March 10, 2013 at 10:57 am |
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
Advertisement
About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.