home
RSS
April 13th, 2013
02:38 PM ET

My Take: Nothing wrong with Nazi assignment

Editor's note: Stephen Prothero, a Boston University religion scholar and author of "The American Bible: How Our Words Unite, Divide, and Define a Nation," is a regular CNN Belief Blog contributor.

By Stephen Prothero, Special to CNN

(CNN) – School officials in Albany, New York, are racing to control the damage after a teacher at Albany High School gave students a persuasive writing assignment that challenged them to defend the proposition that “Jews are evil.”

After studying Nazi propaganda and rhetoric, sophomores in three English classes were instructed to imagine that their teacher was “a member of the government in Nazi Germany” and to prove that that they were “loyal to the Nazis.”

But this unidentified teacher is now caught up in a propaganda swirl of his or her own.

Albany Superintendent Marguerite Vanden Wyngaard, at a Friday press conference at which she was flanked by members of the Anti-Defamation League and Jewish Federation of New York, apologized and promised disciplinary action.

One student, Emily Karandy, told The Times Union of Albany that she kept putting off the assignment “because I didn’t want to think about it” and she felt “horrible” when she turned it in.

Follow the CNN Belief Blog on Twitter

New York City Councilman David Greenfield has called for the resignation of the teacher, who has been placed on leave.

"The teacher responsible for coming up with and assigning students with this task must be held accountable for attempting to indoctrinate children with anti-Semitic beliefs," Greenfield said in a statement. "Quite obviously, this teacher lacks the judgment and common sense necessary to have a position of such great responsibility and is clearly not fit to return to the classroom."

"You asked a child to support the notion that the Holocaust was justified, that's my struggle," said Vanden Wyngaard. "It's an illogical leap for a student to make."

I think it’s Greenfield who is lacking in common sense here. And it's the superintendent who is being illogical.

I suppose it is possible that the teacher is a closet Nazi attempting to reconstruct the Third Reich in Albany. But isn’t it more likely that he or she is trying to teach students about the dangers of propaganda and the horrors of the Holocaust?

Consider the student who felt “horrible” about doing this assignment. Is that really a bad thing? How are high school students today supposed to feel about Nazism and the Holocaust?

Apparently, what they are supposed to feel (and think) is nothing, because the lesson high school teachers are going to take away from this fiasco is to avoid this topic at all costs, lest they risk losing their jobs.

When I was an assistant professor at Georgia State University in Atlanta, I used to teach Nazi theology. My students read sermons by Nazi theologians arguing that Jews were evil and were responsible for killing Jesus. They also read a book called “Theologians Under Hitler” by Robert P. Erickson, who tried to explain how and why Christian thinkers could come to believe that exterminating Jews was somehow Christ-like.

I am not a Nazi. I was not teaching Nazi theology as the truth. I was teaching it as propaganda, just like this Albany High School teacher was doing. My purpose was not to make my students sympathetic to Nazism. My purpose was to unsettle them. And to teach them something along the way.

I had two goals when teaching this material.

First, I wanted my students to realize that smart Christians with doctoral degrees supported the Holocaust. Second, I wanted them to grapple with the implications of this fact on their own religious commitments. Do Christians today have any responsibility to know this history and to try to make sure it doesn’t happen again? If so, how can they exercise that responsibility without coming to understand the contours of Nazi thought?

But instead of grappling with these questions, my students almost universally tried to side-step them. The Nazis were not Christians, they told me confidently, because Christians would never kill Jews just for being Jews. Case closed. Time to move on to more comfortable topics.

What I witnessed in Atlanta, and what we are seeing today in Albany, is a failure of imagination. My students were so locked into their current circumstances that they couldn’t imagine things being different in a different place and time.

For them, to believe that Christians could condone the Holocaust was (to quote from the Albany superintendent) an “illogical leap.” But Christians did condone the Holocaust. How can students learn that without digging into the primary materials? And how better to wrestle with those primary materials than by constructing a persuasive essay built upon them?

If I were teaching at Albany High School I might have worded this assignment a little differently. But it's a terrific assignment, and one that should be used at more high schools across the country. To far too many American youth, the Holocaust is an echo of an echo. Assignments like this bring it alive in all its horrors.

CNN’s Belief Blog: The faith angles behind the biggest stories

But students aren't the only victims of the failure of imagination we are now witnessing among Albany school officials and Jewish leaders. The teacher is a victim, too. And so are public school teachers across the country who are being told via this fiasco not to be creative as teachers, not to challenge their students to think in new ways.

If this teacher is fired, I will invite him or her to Boston University, where I now teach, to explain what he or she was trying to accomplish in challenging students with this assignment. And I will give the same assignment to my college students. I think it will do them some good.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Stephen Prothero.

- CNN Belief Blog contributor

Filed under: Culture wars • Education • Holocaust • Judaism • New York • Prejudice • United States

soundoff (1,829 Responses)
  1. billybill

    Teaching students critical thinking and the dangers of propaganda is not the same as indoctrinating them to be come anti-semites. This teacher perhaps should have chosen another era to teach this lesson from but it is never the less a good lesson. Do you want the youth of this nation to be sheep believing everything they are told, or would you rather them learn to read through the BS and think for themselves?
    ""You asked a child to support the notion that the Holocaust was justified, "–That was not the assignment at all and Mr. Wyngaard should be ashamed of this misrepresentation of the issue. The assignment was to understand propaganda and rhetoric, putting many outside their comfort zone, as it should. Instead what these children have learned is to avoid anything that may make them uncomfortable, and thus losing insights into how otherwise good people like the average german citizen at the time could allow such atrocities to happen.
    Let us take a lesson from Anne Frank who wrote, "Despite everything, I believe that people are really good at heart."
    Good people can do bad things, even if it is by doing nothing, and this lesson has been lost because it makes some uncomfortable.

    April 15, 2013 at 9:56 pm |
    • jamesfoley

      Amen

      April 15, 2013 at 9:58 pm |
    • hawaiiguest

      That's what many parents tell their children to do unfortunately. If they don't get to keep their mind in the little box the parents have forced it into, then run to mommy claiming that people are trying to force you to think a certain way. It's a sad insight to the laziness and close-minded stupidity of many people in America right now.

      April 15, 2013 at 9:59 pm |
    • Cyn

      Double Amen!

      April 15, 2013 at 10:32 pm |
  2. Matt

    It's an intellectual exercise.

    It isn't easy to defend an obviously wrong position, but being able to make an argument and agree with it are DIFFERENT. Sheesh, no wonder education is going downhill.

    April 15, 2013 at 9:30 pm |
    • jamesfoley

      @Matt... Agreed

      April 15, 2013 at 9:35 pm |
  3. Faith

    It is important for students of history to try and understand all of the psychological effects that were involved in a person joining the Nazi party. It wasn't purely anti-Semitism. Group-think, national pride, misplaced hatred, fear, loyalty, blind obedience, and being fed false ideas that the Jewish population were a major threat to the Germans. From my understanding, the teacher wasn't trying to defend the actions of the Nazi party but rather tried to encourage the students to think critically and outside their reality. In no way was this assignment in support of the Holocaust. I hope that the teacher gets reinstated.
    Students need to learn how to think critically and need to go beyond thinking just Nazis were bad. They need to understand why Nazis held their ideas, the history before the formation of the party, and the propganda that was being shown at that time.

    April 15, 2013 at 9:28 pm |
    • Cyn

      Exactly! Right On! These kids missed out on a chance to actually LEARN something and step out of their boring, EOG test-taking world......all for closed minded, politically-correct (not very progressive or smart) principals and parents.... And we wonder why America is 25th in the industrialized world in Education?!!

      THIS is why!! Peace. CC

      April 15, 2013 at 10:39 pm |
  4. Ron

    This was a very inappropriate high school assignment and except for some possibly very thematic college courses, inappropriate period.

    April 15, 2013 at 9:27 pm |
  5. Sean

    The writer of this article is an idiot. This is not the proper approach to teaching people about Nazis. I certainly wouldn't want him teaching my children.

    April 15, 2013 at 9:21 pm |
  6. Brian Mc

    The teacher had his game face on about his assignment. To start on the idea about how Adolf Hitler got to his starting of the NAZI party and using MILLIONS of worthy tools(people), read "Mein Kampf." It is a book of hate but a starving and defeated Germany took it as a bible to restart the country. He said "Great liars are also great magicians." But his best quote was "If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed. He was very bright with the exception of two things: Fighting Russia and not letting his Generals run the show. As for the Holocaust, it happened. The difference between that and Lincoln not freeing the slaves is 6 millions were not wiped out in less than 6 years.

    April 15, 2013 at 9:08 pm |
    • jamesfoley

      Ignorance, spoken with passion, is too often mistaken as fact by those with neither the time nor the inclination to dig deeper into the issues considered controversial OR acceptable, and by those with too much invested in their chosen spokespeople to ever admit they were wrong. The despondant and downtrodden germans of hitlers day were no exception to that observation.

      April 15, 2013 at 9:15 pm |
  7. jamesfoley

    God is a personification.

    April 15, 2013 at 9:07 pm |
    • jamesfoley

      A personification of man's most noble thoughts and ideals at the time of his having created gods.

      April 15, 2013 at 9:07 pm |
    • jamesfoley

      The Devil

      April 15, 2013 at 9:09 pm |
    • jamesfoley

      equals the Anti-thesis

      April 15, 2013 at 9:10 pm |
    • jamesfoley

      of that noble personification.

      April 15, 2013 at 9:11 pm |
    • jamesfoley

      I just love it when religious blogs attempt to ban the truth and scrub it from their conversations. This proves to me how weak their position really is that I cannot write that all out in one comment. :/ How very Christian of you 😉 How typical

      April 15, 2013 at 9:12 pm |
  8. Dr Matrix

    The Vatican supported the Nazis, should we get rid of the church? Maybe it wold have gone over better if it was put in terms of today and the assignment was to try to understand the radical Islam hatred of the West. Maybe they could try and understand the distrust of organized religion and the evils brought to us by theocracies, including the Christian ones of the past.

    April 15, 2013 at 8:50 pm |
    • jamesfoley

      The vatican also believes, apparently, that condoms are to god, what Harry potter's Cloak of Invisibility was to death. Go figure.

      April 15, 2013 at 9:02 pm |
  9. jamesfoley

    Ignorance, spoken with passion, is too often mistaken as fact by those with neither the time nor inclination to dig deeper into the issues considered controversial and by those who have too much invested in their chosen spokespeople to ever admit they were wrong.

    The fact is, this assignment was and is a necessary part of learning and empathy. It is important to look at things from both sides. ALWAYS. The teacher seems to have wanted the kids to be able to keep cool head and think honestly. As far as we know there was no ulterior motive here, just learning. I do think a better way to do the experiment would be for half the class to represent the Nazi Propaganda, and the other to evaluate it and give it's response. Then have all the students consider the material in open discussion.
    To the Student who said she felt horrible... 🙂 Thank you. You should. That is a wholey natural and warranted response. However, you should also consider how you came to believe those would be nazi propaganda tactics, and see if you can spot similar actions amongst your classmates. In it's most direct form, nazi tactics are the same as terrorist and bully tactics. Intimidation, physical threats, destruction of the target 'id', Ad Hominem, Hasty Generalization. These tactics should be studied and policies enacted to try to do away with them. Those who forget history are doomed to repeat it.

    I applaud this teacher and his/her efforts to engage these young minds in critical thinking. I'm thinking quitet a few opf the commentors here could take a lesson themselves.

    April 15, 2013 at 8:48 pm |
    • jamesfoley

      It isn't that this man/woman or that says a thing/act is good or evil, but that the thing/act itself on it's own can truly be considered good or evil. Concepts of good and evil are preexisting conditions 😉

      April 15, 2013 at 9:38 pm |
  10. Mario

    What a mindless person who would lead young people into such a dark place. Are there not a lot of positive things to test their minds? This man should have his teaching license teken away. He is sick!!!

    April 15, 2013 at 8:48 pm |
    • jamesfoley

      Actually the teacher is involving these students in critical thinking as to how to discover the weak points of an argument.

      Consider this... I write two comments in many debates... both on my desktop. One in the affirmative and one in the negative. I consider both sides to my answer and find the weak points in both. It's a great way to find out the truth.

      April 15, 2013 at 8:50 pm |
  11. bill constantine

    Why do we have anti-semitisim? I know that jews stick together in some ways but why anti Jewish. I have hearing this all my life. I am 83 years of age and have had many Jewish friends..A Jewish person was asked to be the ceo of a YMCA and he did a good job..Jews are not lazy..Bill the Greek from Las Vegas.

    April 15, 2013 at 8:41 pm |
  12. Chad

    First, I wanted my students to realize that smart Christians with doctoral degrees supported the Holocaust. Second, I wanted them to grapple with the implications of this fact on their own religious commitments. Do Christians today have any responsibility to know this history and to try to make sure it doesn’t happen again? If so, how can they exercise that responsibility without coming to understand the contours of Nazi thought? - Stephen Prothero

    question: why didnt you establish a goal of demonstrating how erroneous any doctrine is that seeks to blame the crucifixion on "Jews"?

    Why would you instead try and convince people that "smart christians" bought into that, and we better really evaluate our faith if this is what it can lead to?

    just kidding !!, you're an atheist, you feel you have your reasons 🙂

    April 15, 2013 at 8:36 pm |
    • Akira

      He's not an atheist. You just WANT him to be, so you can criticize his every word.
      I understand that, I truly do.
      Wishing doesn't make it fact. And neither does your likely response, "he's religiously confused" mean he's an atheist.
      Sorry.
      If you don't like what he writes, criticize that. Calling him an atheist, however, is a flat-out lie.
      Similar to someone calling you a Taoist. See how that works? 🙂

      April 15, 2013 at 8:44 pm |
    • Chad

      "Calling him an atheist, however, is a flat-out lie. Similar to someone calling you a Taoist"

      =>A. As you tell me all the time, an atheist is one who "lacks belief in a god", a description that fits Prothero perfectly I'm sure you agree.
      B. Not attempting to live in harmony with "Tao" means I am not a Taoist..

      pretty straightforward.

      April 15, 2013 at 8:52 pm |
    • jamesfoley

      A-theism... without belief in deity

      Glad I could clear that up for you chad.

      April 15, 2013 at 9:04 pm |
    • Akira

      He doesn't lack a belief in God. He is confused about religion. I'm sure you would agree that the two are not remotely similar.

      You flat out lie. Why?
      Stop trying to justify your feelings by calling him something that is a lie, Chad.

      I know you're not Taoist. Calling you one would be a lie. Similar to your lying when you call Prothero an atheist.

      April 15, 2013 at 9:08 pm |
    • Akira

      And, Chad, until you can oost a link where Prothero unequivically states that he is an atheist, you calling him that makes you a liar.

      Not what YOU consider weak and strong atheists are, but what Prothero himself says.

      April 15, 2013 at 9:13 pm |
    • Chad

      "confused about religion" is the same as "has no belief in a god"

      April 15, 2013 at 9:13 pm |
    • jamesfoley

      Ok... Chad's a troll. Buh Bye. Do not feed the trolls

      April 15, 2013 at 9:17 pm |
    • Akira

      No. It is not.
      He didn't say he is confused about God. He said he is cofused about religion.
      One doesn't have to belong to a religion to believe in God.

      You're wrong.

      April 15, 2013 at 9:17 pm |
    • Akira

      @jamesfoley, Chad isn't a troll, but he never admits when he's wrong, and to persist in his lie is decidedly something Jesus would not want him to do; nor would God.
      9th Commandment, and all...

      April 15, 2013 at 9:29 pm |
    • Moby Schtick

      Chad once again proves himself a lying sack of sh!t. I've never heard of an atheist, weak or strong, who would identify with "religiously confused." If you're an atheist, you're not "religiously confused." You can only be religious confused if you don't believe in the central tenant of religion. What a fvcking moron.

      April 15, 2013 at 9:44 pm |
    • Chad

      @Moby "You can only be religious confused if you don't believe in the central tenant of religion"

      =>central tenant of any theistic religion is belief in their god, and as you note, he doesnt. Making him an (weak) atheist, lacking belief in a god.

      I agree with your Moby!

      April 15, 2013 at 10:04 pm |
    • jamesfoley

      Actually, that would make him an agnostic, not an atheist. Glad to clear that up as well 😉

      April 15, 2013 at 10:16 pm |
    • endwrapper

      So Chad was a troll after all, LOL.

      April 16, 2013 at 12:38 am |
  13. Kim in Michigan

    Wow it is amazing how many people defend this assignment. Nice to see so many educators too lazy to teach. How hard was this assignment to think up? Take one of the most well known atrocities in memory and go make students learn. Gee, wonder if it will stretch their research skills – not! Maybe they will be challenged to shape ideas versus finding, say, 1000's of papers, essays, etc. on the topic already. Shock value does not produce critical thinking skills and at the end of the day it would be great if students were challenged. This assignment just makes me think the teacher is the challenged one.

    April 15, 2013 at 8:35 pm |
    • hawaiiguest

      You, along with many others, seem to have completely missed the point of this assignment. You saw the words "Nazi" and "assignment", and shut off your entire reading comprehension faculties there.

      April 15, 2013 at 8:38 pm |
    • Kim in Michigan

      No, I read the entire article as well as the original story. I am making the point that students would NOT be challenged to think on their own when this is one of the most highly covered historical events involving mass persuasion. Teacher pretending to be edgy. So after the assignment is turned in, will teacher point out how a better argument could have been made here or here, with the colored pencil? Where is the critical thinking? It is not like they were being asked to analyze or critique either side, or to identify the persuasive tactics in use, so that later in life they could recognize a straw man or reductio ad absurdum when someone tries to use it on them.

      April 15, 2013 at 9:16 pm |
    • hawaiiguest

      This wasn't so much about critical thinking, and more about the effects that consistent control, fear, and propaganda can have on otherwise rational people. It seems you're more focused on the topic of Naziism than what is trying to be shown.
      "Prove you love the Nazi regime or be killed"
      "Prove you love the Nazi regime or get an F"
      Maybe I'm being to optimistic of the intent of the assignment, but it's what makes sense to me.

      April 15, 2013 at 9:30 pm |
  14. Jorge Sedano

    question to students: What would have happened had Lincoln not freed the slaves? Where would the US be today....bet the white guy that wrote this column would not ask a bunch of kids to write about that.. These lessons teach nothing.. That is why the US education system fails...Iys meant to cuase failure. Its been going on long enough to come to that conclusion..

    April 15, 2013 at 8:29 pm |
    • Akira

      If you want what if scenarios, a much better example would be to ask the kids to imagine if whites had been the ones enslaved.

      The authors skin color is irrelevant.

      April 15, 2013 at 8:51 pm |
    • jamesfoley

      @Akira... Agreed

      April 15, 2013 at 9:56 pm |
  15. chet

    The same assignment could have been done without any kind of stereotypical "Jew" assignment. In it self it is a sick and repugnant thought that continues today about Jews. As was mentioned before – if it were about a Black or Hispanic the stuff would have hit the fan even more so!
    Firing is a bit harsh but hey you step out of line that happens!

    April 15, 2013 at 8:26 pm |
  16. IMeanReally

    Of course the assignment is OK. But I'm betting that if the assignment was about blacks rather than Jews, there wouldn't be the opinions of acceptance like there are now. For some reason, when it comes to Jews, the left trips over their tolerance and co-existence plank.

    April 15, 2013 at 8:20 pm |
  17. matt

    isnt it important to understand how a whole country fell under the nazi spell for it not to happen again?

    April 15, 2013 at 8:15 pm |
    • Chad

      @matt "isnt it important to understand how a whole country fell under the nazi spell for it not to happen again?"

      =>Yes, one wonders why Prothero attempted to that opportunity to cast doubt on the truth of Christianity instead.

      But, then again, being an athiest committed to that, it makes sense.

      April 15, 2013 at 8:29 pm |
    • midwest rail

      Relidiously confused in no way equals atheist.

      April 15, 2013 at 8:34 pm |
    • Chad

      "Relidiously confused in no way equals atheist."

      really?

      what does it mean?

      April 15, 2013 at 8:39 pm |
    • midwest rail

      As you're well aware, "atheist" simply means one who believes there is no deity. Nowhere does the phrase religiously confused equate to that definition.

      April 15, 2013 at 8:41 pm |
    • Chad

      @midwest rail "As you're well aware, "atheist" simply means one who believes there is no deity. Nowhere does the phrase religiously confused equate to that definition"

      =>actually, that is the definition of "strong atheist", the definition of "weak atheist" is one who lacks a belief in a god, which "religiously confused" fits with perfectly.

      April 15, 2013 at 8:43 pm |
    • midwest rail

      Yet you did not bother to make that important distinction in either of your posts this evening regarding Mr. Prothero. Why is that ? Was it merely to provoke a reaction, as so many of your posts are designed ?

      April 15, 2013 at 8:49 pm |
    • hawaiiguest

      @Midwest

      Didn't you know? According to Chad, anyone who believes there is no god is lying to themselves, and those who lack a belief do so only because they haven't read the bible enough times to engage in the confirmatory bias. Anyone who disagrees with chad on what the bible says also hasn't read it and lies about reading it.
      This is what chad thinks. This is how he sleeps at night, by being so blindingly, stupidly arrogant that he has convinced himself that he can't be wrong, and everyone who disagrees will burn in hell.

      April 15, 2013 at 8:51 pm |
    • Chad

      @midwest rail "Yet you did not bother to make that important distinction in either of your posts this evening regarding Mr. Prothero. Why is that ? "Was it merely to provoke a reaction, as so many of your posts are designed"

      =>there are several "Chad"s...

      my first post this evening was at 8:23

      April 15, 2013 at 9:00 pm |
    • Akira

      Chad is flat-out lying when he calls Prothero an atheist. He has done so several times.
      Liar. Chad is a liar.

      April 15, 2013 at 9:02 pm |
    • Chad

      "religiously confused" is the same as "has no belief in a god"

      April 15, 2013 at 9:08 pm |
    • Dippy

      Chads...not Chad's. Does anyone here know about plurals?

      April 15, 2013 at 9:12 pm |
    • hawaiiguest

      @Chad

      ""religiously confused" is the same as "has no belief in a god""
      Oh you mean like all the other assertions you make that are true because you say so?

      April 15, 2013 at 9:34 pm |
    • Moby Schtick

      Chad once again proves himself a lying sack of sh!t. I've never heard of an atheist, weak or strong, who would identify with "religiously confused." If you're an atheist, you're not "religiously confused." You can only be religious confused if you don't believe in the central tenant of religion. What a fvcking moron.

      April 15, 2013 at 9:42 pm |
    • Akira

      As I pointed out before, Mr. Prothero has said nowhere that he was confused about God, only about religion.
      Religion is not God.
      One does not need a religion to believe in God.
      Chad needs to acknowledge this distinction.

      April 15, 2013 at 9:46 pm |
    • Chad

      @Moby "You can only be religious confused if you don't believe in the central tenant of religion"

      =>central tenant of any theistic religion is belief in their god, and as you note, he doesnt. Making him an (weak) atheist, lacking belief in a god.

      I agree with your Moby!!

      April 15, 2013 at 10:06 pm |
    • Moby Schtick

      Chad, you've gotten so good at reading the bible and taking the meaning for the opposite of what the verse says that you're starting to do it in real life. Pity.

      No other person with an ounce of reading comprehension would twist what I said to mean the opposite of what the logic demands. Congrats, Chad.

      April 15, 2013 at 10:29 pm |
    • jamesfoley

      That would make him an agnostic, not an atheist sport

      April 15, 2013 at 10:52 pm |
  18. Steve

    I agree that this has the potential to be a good assignment. The question is whether it was merely used to show a difficult example of persuasive writing, or if it was meant to show the dangers. If it was simply for the former, then it is quite insensitive (although I still do not agree with forcing the teacher to be fired, assuming he has no history of antisemitism). If the purpose of the assignment was to lead into the dangers of persuasive writing, then it is a real shame what is happening to this guy...Of course, the problem with the media these days is they don't care about the truth because antisemitic teacher indoctrinating youth makes for one great headline to get clicks.

    And i'm Jewish if it makes a difference.

    April 15, 2013 at 8:12 pm |
    • Angi

      Integrated teaching is being pushed heavily, and each time a teacher tries, this happens. I suspect the purpose was BOTH to present a very difficult argument to make (debate classes do this, asking a student to formulate an argument FOR something they are actually AGAINST as a way of teaching critical thinking and persuasive writing skills), as well as bringing greater understanding to the students on how the Nazi movement took off in the first place – that is, how everyday people became monsters. These are high school students, for goodness' sake! They *should* be able to process all of these ideas and skills without crying to mama.

      April 15, 2013 at 8:38 pm |
  19. Ajax

    Another superstar of false equivalence. It wasn't the subject, it was the structure of the lesson that was the problem. The teacher forgot that presentation is everything.

    April 15, 2013 at 8:09 pm |
  20. Splendid

    Here's how I would complete the assignment: Beneath a picture od dead Jews in front of an Nazi oven I would addend a caption that reads "Good Jews"; beneath another picture of Albert Einstein would be a caption that reads "Bad Jew." End of essay Mr Prothero, now grade me on that!

    April 15, 2013 at 8:08 pm |
    • Akira

      Wut?

      April 15, 2013 at 9:55 pm |
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
Advertisement
About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.