home
RSS
Who hears #PrayersForOklahoma?
May 21st, 2013
04:45 PM ET

Who hears #PrayersForOklahoma?

By Daniel Burke, CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor
[twitter-follow screen_name='BurkeCNN']

(CNN) - God may not notice the thousands of prayers tweeted for victims of Oklahoma’s devastating tornado - but Ricky Gervais sure has. And he is not pleased.

As of Tuesday afternoon, more than 75,000 people have used the hashtag #PrayForOklahoma, including pop starlets, pastors and politicians, according to Topsy.com, a trend-monitoring site.

For example, the White House tweeted,

But the hashtag and the sentiments it promotes prompted a fierce backlash on social media, led by Gervais, a British comedian, and other prominent nonbelievers.

And while one Oklahoma City pastor says he appreciates the Twitter prayers, some religious scholars say devout petitions require more than moving your hands across a keyboard.

"A prayer is supposed to have a consequence for you," said Elizabeth Drescher, a lecturer at Santa Clara University in California. "It's not an act of magic."

Gervais, an ardent foe of organized religion, was more caustic.

After MTV tweeted that pop stars Beyonce, Rihanna and Katy Perry are sending their prayers to Oklahoma, Gervais responded, “I feel like an idiot now … I only sent money.”

Gervais and other atheists also kick-started a counter-trend, using the hashtag #ActuallyDoSomethingForOklahoma.

“If all people are doing is praying, it is worthless,” Hemant Mehta, an Illinois math teacher who writes the blog “Friendly Atheist,” told CNN. “If they are praying and donating to the Red Cross, that’s more like it.”

Mehta is promoting a group called Foundation Beyond Belief that aims to provide a humanist response to crises like the Oklahoma tornado.

The prayer debate spilled into other social media sites as well, with commenters on CNN’s Facebook page sparring over God’s role in Monday’s destructive whirlwind.

According to Oklahoma officials, 24 people have died, many more are injured, and once-orderly streets look likes foretastes of the apocalypse.

In response to a woman who said she was praying for the victims, Facebook commenter Peter Tongue replied, “If prayer works, there wouldn’t be a disaster like this in the first place .... so please keep your religion to yourself.”

But believers had their say as well.

“God is still in control!” said Wilbur Dugger, a commenter on CNN’s Facebook page. “Everything (God) does is to get our attention. … My sympathy and prayers go out to those who get caught up in his demonstrations of (God) ruling the world.”

The social-media sparring over prayer and God’s will reflect a culture in which traditional notions of religion - and the places where people talk about faith - are changing faster than a Twitter feed, said Drescher, the Santa Clara lecturer.

“We’re watching people re-articulate what it means to be spiritual and religious,” she said.

Just a few years ago, for example, no one knew what a hashtag was. Now the “#PrayFor...” meme appears after almost every national and international tragedy.

But what exactly does it mean? Is the tweeting multitude really folding its hands in prayer, or is it a fleeting expression of existential angst? Or maybe just a trendy thing to say?

“It seems to express hope and anxiety, and maybe even helplessness,” Drescher said.

“At the same time, it evokes this strong response from people who see it as a cop-out, a way of claiming some kind of spiritual space that doesn’t actually have any meaning to the people who are posting the meme or the community they are addressing.”

Traditionally, prayer has required something of the pray-er: an orientation toward reverence, a readiness to act, Drescher continued. “You are meant to do something - and that something may not be an easy thing.”

Slapping a hashtag at the end of a tweet doesn’t meet that standard, the scholar said.

The Rev. David Johnson of St. Andrew’s United Methodist Church in Oklahoma City said the prayerful tweets mean something to him - even if he’s been too busy to read them.

Since Monday, St. Andrew’s has become a Red Cross command post and reunion site for families to find loved ones caught in the tornado’s path. The tragedy has also touched the congregation itself, with homes, and some lives, lost on Tuesday, Johnson said.

Told of the Twitter prayers, Johnson said, “that’s awesome.”

“People feel helpless - like God called them to do something but they don’t know what. That’s where prayer comes in.”

Johnson said his church appreciates the many material donations coming its way: the generator sent by a lady from Arkansas, the food and water sent from neighboring towns. But they also solicit, and are happy to receive, the many prayers recited - or tweeted - on their behalf, he said.

“We’ve seen quite a lot of trauma in the last day,” Johnson said. “Obviously, people are going to ask why God allows tornadoes to happen. That’s just part of this world. God doesn’t promise us that bad things won’t happen, he promises to help us get through it. That’s what prayer helps us do.”

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Belief • United States

soundoff (3,515 Responses)
  1. PrimeNumber

    The CNN Faith Blog is a direct gift from God. It has given us a chance to see what so many atheists are really made of.

    May 22, 2013 at 4:06 pm |
    • Patrick

      Well luckily for us Atheists we have seen what you Christians are like through 2,000 odd years of hatred, bigotry, and chauvinism. And don't get me started on how much you have hampered the progress of the human species.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:10 pm |
    • Richard Cranium

      Atheists are made of the same thing...except minus one delusion.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:29 pm |
    • Seoras

      the atheists are really helping their cause with all the hatred they are expressing against people of faith

      May 22, 2013 at 4:40 pm |
    • catholic engineer

      Patrick, "hampered progress" you say. Most of you atheists would stand in full view of a mushroom cloud and proclaim the glories of science. The concept of "megadeath" was introduced by scienctists. The hypothetical "Doomsday Clock" was developed by scientists in 1947 to estimate how much closer science has brought us to extinction.

      Reading, Patrick, is fundamental.

      May 22, 2013 at 5:01 pm |
  2. rufus

    Tornadoes don't kill people. God kills people.

    May 22, 2013 at 4:06 pm |
  3. ug

    Trust me...God hears and see's everything...but a stupid lib media outlet like cnn would have you believe he doesn't...

    May 22, 2013 at 4:05 pm |
    • ME II

      "Trust me"

      With such wild claims, why should I?

      May 22, 2013 at 4:07 pm |
    • gorp

      And here is the crux of the theists argument. You have to say "trust me" because you can offer no evidence.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:07 pm |
    • Patrick

      Right! Trust you, because you can obviously prove this right?

      May 22, 2013 at 4:08 pm |
    • ScienceNeedsNoMagic

      God heard and saw what He did in Oklahoma. He's a bit of a jerk if you ask me. Did he enjoy listening to the prayers of those he killed and hurt during the storm? His "mysterious ways" are classic examples of a psychopath. I have more logical things to believe in. And they have tangible evidence and have yet to make me ask: "Why would nature do such a thing?"

      May 22, 2013 at 4:18 pm |
  4. Seoras

    so much hatred towards Christians, Muslims, & people of faith.
    Why?

    May 22, 2013 at 4:03 pm |
    • gorp

      You're conflating criticism with hate.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:06 pm |
  5. Mary

    What a bunch of jerks! It is our right to believe, just as it is your right NOT to believe. To belittle, condemn and berate others for believing shows you to be nothing but a bunch of jerks, plain and simple. GROW UP and quit acting like brats who want their way and their way only.

    May 22, 2013 at 4:03 pm |
    • Mart

      works both ways there Mary just remember that

      May 22, 2013 at 4:22 pm |
    • HotAirAce

      Please have a word with your fellow delusionals, especially Azzhole AtheistsMorons, the best recent example of the christian behaviour we have learned to expect.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:32 pm |
    • Not sure how I feel

      I dont think it's so much berating FOR believing per se, it's the idea that what you believe in will fix everything. That's frustrating to say the least, dangerous in worse case. To have real problems and to have milions of people standing in the way, or blocking, the path to finding solutions to those problems is not just you having an opinion, is it? It's an action. Isn't it? If the very religious deny climate change, it they push for more fossil fuels, if they block things that would help study climate change, or how to reverse it, or how to build fuels that wont add to it, then those aren't just religious 'views' are they? They are destructive actions that will result in more dead people. If you believe that God will provide, therefore, we dont need building codes to sustain the winds that the climate models we deny will say we will get, then it's not just your opinion anymore is it? It's an actual agenda that block intelligent decision making and that's down right dangerous. if religious beliefs caused that school to not have proper building codes, If so much as one government official who didn't want to make buildings have safe rooms said "well, we're not in charge ,the Lord is" then his religion DID contribute to the death of those children. YOu realize that, right? instead of making a good logical decisions, he chose his opinion of a man in the sky, this fantasy idea of how the children would be protected instead of owning the problem of figure out how, within the laws of REAL physics, those children WILL be protected in teh face of storms the climate models say will become the norm.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:33 pm |
    • ScienceNeedsNoMagic

      Mary: I'll shut up once the religious "right" stop trying to make this a theocracy. Keep your book out of the laws, and I'll gladly silently let you believe in whatever fairy story you want.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:34 pm |
  6. Lisa B.

    Of course this is a tragedy, but I can't help but laugh when some gomer whose house and property are gone thanks god for sparing him. This is the "Bible Belt" part of our country. If god liked it, and he really existed, don't you think he would have wiped out the coasts by now? And I don't mean an earthquake here and there, or a hurricane...I mean really wiped it out! If he really hated gays, wouldn't he have gone after NY, SF, and LA like Sodom and Gomorrha? Just sayin'.

    May 22, 2013 at 4:03 pm |
  7. {*}

    Ref the book Bloody Skies: A 15th AAF B-17 Crew.... by Melvin McQuire. Describing appalling combat conditions, the author notes: " Most of us felt a strong belief in God. The ones who cracked under the strain generally were those without that belief." 1 Maccabees 2 says something similar:" None who hope in heaven shall fail in strength."
    Let Ricky Gervais and the like stay out of foxholes and disaster areas, and safely behind their keyboards.

    May 22, 2013 at 4:00 pm |
    • Bob

      Why is Ricky squeaking, anyways? If he doesn't wanna pray, let him not pray. Nobody is forcing him to pray!

      May 22, 2013 at 4:05 pm |
    • Ben

      So " a religious person think religious people are better"? Got it. Checkmate, atheists!

      May 22, 2013 at 4:05 pm |
    • herchato

      "cracking under strain"? What does that mean? Started crying, fainted, threw up, became enraged, became violent. Believers or nonbelievers will crack with enough pressure and will express that in any number of ways. Believers are no stronger or weaker than anyone else.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:14 pm |
    • ScienceNeedsNoMagic

      Let me guess, the Author, Melvin was a person of faith? Highly scientific research that would be.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:35 pm |
    • Prayer does nothing

      And how appalling were the conditions of the civilian recipients?

      May 22, 2013 at 4:59 pm |
  8. Jordan

    Which god or should I refer to whose god is everyone referring to?

    May 22, 2013 at 4:00 pm |
    • {*}

      You should direct prayers to the God of Abraham. This is the God who spelled the beginning of the end for polytheism.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:02 pm |
    • anthony

      direct them to Thor... duh... his hammer did all that mess. can't you tell?

      May 22, 2013 at 4:24 pm |
    • Richard Cranium

      Direct them to Mercury...he'll get them delivered to whoever you address them to...or the Flash.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:27 pm |
  9. onepercenter

    People prayed for Oklahoma...atheists gave money...prayer works!

    May 22, 2013 at 3:59 pm |
    • ME II

      Okay, that's funny.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:00 pm |
    • silvia

      what? does it make any sense? your words?

      May 22, 2013 at 4:02 pm |
    • {*}

      Atheists gave money. The Okies (those "wingnuts") are doing the dirty work.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:03 pm |
  10. Jan

    If I was a victim of this tornado, I would NOT want your money Gervais!

    May 22, 2013 at 3:58 pm |
    • ME II

      Really, why?

      May 22, 2013 at 3:59 pm |
    • silvia

      oh but you would pray and thank the god who is so powerful that can make the tornado stop, but chose not to.

      Ill leave you with an Epicuru's quote:
      Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God?

      May 22, 2013 at 4:05 pm |
    • fvroqnz

      Thus expect you will be opposed to and refusing any FEMA help and funds – which come from the heart (and pocket) of the whole nation, not just from the self professed Righteous.

      Even your two intolerant and ignorant US senators know better than that – they who refused help for others, now beg it for themselves.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:09 pm |
    • John

      I guess since you weren't a victim God still likes you.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:11 pm |
    • ScienceNeedsNoMagic

      What about money from any Atheist? Or a Jew? Muslim?
      Hate much?

      May 22, 2013 at 4:37 pm |
  11. jason

    I'd like to think that after the two doooche nooze okhomans coldheart and Inbred did to the suffering sandy victims this was gods revenge on the inhuman oklahomans.

    May 22, 2013 at 3:57 pm |
    • Truth Prevails :-)

      Why should everyone have suffered and more specifically 24 die, for the error's of a few? Not such a loving god.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:02 pm |
  12. kickgas

    Praise Ricky!

    May 22, 2013 at 3:56 pm |
  13. ShaneB

    Its inappropriate, its like complaining someone saying "my thoughts are with you" as not being enough. At a time when people should be pulling together to help one another they're being divisive. There are times to argue religion or lack thereof, this isn't one of them.

    May 22, 2013 at 3:56 pm |
    • Adonomo

      Thank you Shane for your thoughtful write up. That is my sentiment exactly. This not the time to argue.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:02 pm |
    • CarolH

      I feel exactly the same way. Picking a religion fight in the midst of this is in extremely poor taste and terrible timing.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:09 pm |
    • Opinion-man

      This is PRECISELY the time to argue about it! The only way to get people to think about their theology and some of its absurdities is in moments of crisis. Once the crisis has passed, they slip back into comfortable, unthinking ways. Acc. to your view, theology is only for the calm moments. If you're in a disaster, and you're thinking God spared you while others were killed as part of some kind of "plan," then you need to rethink that IN THE MOMENT. If you wait, it's too late.

      How does anyone talk about some kind of "God" who apparently has some kind of hand in the forces of nature when this same "God" apparently does nothing to stop the deaths of innocent children?
      I just watched a mom whose kid survived. Obviously, it's great he survived, but to thank God that one's OWN child survived when others' children didn't is poor theology and muddled thinking.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:22 pm |
    • ShaneB

      @Opinion-man No its not the precise time, its akin to why we outlaw lawyers from badgering accident victims its inhumane.

      May 22, 2013 at 5:12 pm |
  14. kickgas

    Nothing fails like prayer!

    May 22, 2013 at 3:55 pm |
    • george

      Thats because you never tried it or you asked for the wrong things?

      May 22, 2013 at 3:58 pm |
    • ME II

      @george,
      Funny, I could say the same about offerings to Zeus.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:02 pm |
    • george

      Ever think about the miracel of birth and how we all got on this great planet...just an accident huh? Just happened huh? I DONT THINK SO..and No it isnt MAGIC

      May 22, 2013 at 4:05 pm |
    • ME II

      @george,
      "I DONT THINK"

      obviously.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:10 pm |
    • ScienceNeedsNoMagic

      George says: Ever think about the miracel of birth and how we all got on this great planet...just an accident huh? Just happened huh? I DONT THINK SO..and No it isnt MAGIC"

      No it isn't magic nor is it a miracle. I think about them a bunch, and unlike you, I took biology and others sciences in school and continue to study and understand them to this day.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:40 pm |
  15. Perspective

    Understanding God in trials. This message (link below) gave me some great perspective. I hope it may help others too.

    https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/76931844/04-Understanding%20God%20in%20Trials.mp3

    May 22, 2013 at 3:55 pm |
  16. catholic engineer

    Those who've taken time to read the gospels will have discovered that Jesus was always found among the wretched, the sick, the disciples during the storm at sea, the rejected (to woman caught in adultery), and otherwise suffering. We doubt that Ricky Gervais would have been found in Moore Oklahoma. After all, those who face this kind of tragedy know that people without faith are the first to crack. But if prayer bothers Gervais, what if even an F2 through a car at him?

    May 22, 2013 at 3:55 pm |
    • Opinion-man

      "Through" a car at him???

      May 22, 2013 at 4:05 pm |
    • ScienceNeedsNoMagic

      Well, He killed a bunch of people, so there is your God at work. Killing people willy-nilly, just like all through the Bible. Where is scientific evidence that non-religious people crack first? My non-belief kept me very alert and on topic under all kinds of stress. No silly sky puppet got in my way.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:43 pm |
  17. Snootfull

    They are showing sympathy & doing what they know personally to be helpful & comforting. It does not hurt lil' Ricky so why is he throwing a tantrum? Because he is agnostic does he have the power to ban religious though and try to humiliate people with a positive and helpful enough spirit to say a prayer? Ricky if you can't say something positive at a time like this, please slither back to Europe.

    May 22, 2013 at 3:54 pm |
    • anthony

      he wasn't throwing a tantrum, he was making a comment about how he was actually doing something other than just putting out a # and acting like that is gonna make the situation better. comedians make jokes about things in life that are funny/weird, this is one of those jokes. a very good one too. it made me laugh

      May 22, 2013 at 4:33 pm |
    • HotAirAce

      He did say and do something positive – his message and action was do something tangible with measurable effect, like give money.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:37 pm |
    • ScienceNeedsNoMagic

      Snootfull (of cocaine?):
      Reading comprehension wasn't a strong suite in school for you, huh?

      May 22, 2013 at 4:44 pm |
  18. myeyedea

    It's the religious scholars that are saying only putting a hastag with prayerful sentiments that's not enough, not just Ricky Gervais. The criticism being voiced here is that it's become perfunctory to just say "I'm praying for you," and leaving it at that – kinda like saying "Bless you" after someone sneezes, but did you offer a tissue also? If that hashtag also came with an automatic donation, either in money or to be signed up to volunteer in some way, how many people would be so quick to shoot off those tweets? I think that's what's being called out here in a more significant way than the "do believe" "don't believe" controversy; if those 75,000 tweets came with a committment of something other than sentiment, then perhaps there would be much less cynicism available for people to say there's a disconnect between offering a cyber prayer and offering an engaged prayer.

    May 22, 2013 at 3:53 pm |
    • Matt

      Well said...

      May 22, 2013 at 4:03 pm |
    • Opinion-man

      Nice analogy with the sneeze/tissue event!

      May 22, 2013 at 4:16 pm |
  19. Dan

    If athiests don't believe in God, why do they spend so much time trying to prove he doesn't exist?

    May 22, 2013 at 3:53 pm |
    • sam stone

      perhaps to bring some reason to those who insist not only that god exists, but that they know god's nature and thoughts

      May 22, 2013 at 3:57 pm |
    • Matt

      Because the burden of proof lies with the ones making the claim. Pretty simple really...

      May 22, 2013 at 4:05 pm |
    • Opinion-man

      Because we can't bear the unthinking "theology" behind their world view. Just as anyone might try to address someone's, say, racist views that, say, whites are superior, so non-believers try to point out how crazy some religious beliefs are.
      For instance, I can grant that people in crisis might say things like "Praise God we survived." The unthinking part of that is, "How do you 'praise God' when lots of other people, incl children, were killed in this? Don't you see how self-serving it is to praise God when people have died by chance in the same accident that you, by chance, survived? What kind of God are you praising, exactly? One that helped you survive but let others die?" It's poor theology and it's rampant in America.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:09 pm |
    • Patrick

      Because it has been force fed into us since the day we were born and governs so many decisions and laws that are enacted not inly here, but all over the world. I don't need to prove that god doesn't exist, he doesn't exist as there is absolutely no proof of his existence. If you continue to tell me how I should lead my life because you claim some bunch of bearded fanatics and charlatans wrote a sick book 2,000 years ago, then you better have some valid evidence to back up your absurd claim. Stay OUT of my life.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:13 pm |
    • pickle

      Dan, that's like asking why would someone reply on a blog telling others to skydive without a parachute. Probably ignorance of parachutes and the benefits they provide.

      The best anywhere is God, so I believe him, and thank him for sending Jesus to die for our sins.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:16 pm |
    • HotAirAce

      To shine a bright light on the stupidity of delusional belief, to let others know it is ok to say religion is a crock, to provide a reality and data based alternative to "some god did it" and to be amused at the silly things believers believe.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:41 pm |
  20. LookANDSEE

    Jesus is returning to take His people home.
    The Bible warns us of disasters (getting more frequent) as a sign that it's getting SOON.
    In the meantime we r here to represent Jesus by loving others in His name.
    Giving to charity is the Christian way.
    Non believers may laugh now but not for long.
    When all is said and done, they will see every time the spirit spoke to them and how they pushed it back untill they believed what they wanted to.
    Since God Is love, He doesent force Himself on you.
    Youtube search for "Cosmic Conflict" and see the Bible's take on this

    May 22, 2013 at 3:51 pm |
    • jasoncdanforth

      Go away, crazy person.

      May 22, 2013 at 3:57 pm |
    • sam stone

      "Non believers may laugh now but not for long."

      HAAA-ha
      HAAA-ha
      HAAA-ha
      HAAA-ha
      HAAA-ha
      HAAA-ha
      HAAA-ha
      HAAA-ha
      HAAA-ha
      HAAA-ha

      good enough?

      May 22, 2013 at 3:59 pm |
    • Infinitetruth

      Doesn't force himself on you? Of course not, but his millions of followers sure will.

      In all truth, if what you believe in comforts you and if the faith you hold helps, by all means do so. Believe and have faith in what YOU want to believe and have faith.

      I'll respect your belief and faith, and will even encourage you, but the moment you try to force your beliefs on me, that's when we have a problem.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:02 pm |
    • george

      You make some very good points, if you stop and think a bit about all of the disasters, killings, etc that have taken place over the past few years...and the most recent 1-5 years specifically....maybe someone is trying to tell us something...maybe warnings are all around us and we are not heeding them....

      May 22, 2013 at 4:03 pm |
    • Seyedibar

      Anyone that thinks Yahweh is a god of love needs to go back and study their Ugaritic mythology. His father El (the god who created Eden) banished him from the land for betraying his people to Dagon's naval forces and killing his own half-brother Baal. Later when El died from an animal attack, Yahweh tried to usurp his throne. These gods were never actual gods. We're speaking about mortal kings using religion to hold the Canaanites under the reign of greater Egypt ( inthis case the Jacobian family). Until the hebrews rewrote the tale, Yahweh was not looked upon as a kind deity. Even in the Old Testament he still demands blood sacrifice, war, destruction.
      The tale of Cain vs Abel is based on the legends of Yah versus Baal. If you want to trust in the preposterous tales of the bible, at least take the time to learn where the tales come from.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:05 pm |
    • Truth Prevails :-)

      "The Bible warns us of disasters (getting more frequent) as a sign that it's getting SOON."

      Wow, how blind must one truly be to not comprehend that there is no difference really in the natural disasters of this world and the only reason we hear more of them is due to mass media, not because some 2000 year old book foretells of them?

      May 22, 2013 at 4:07 pm |
    • Opinion-man

      You need to study history, my friend. Jesus himself said (assuming we actually KNOW what he said... which we don't since the Gospels were written a generation after he died) that before the current generation passed away, he'd come again. Didn't happen. Paul's letters imply the same thing. Didn't happen. for 2000 years people have been saying we're living in the end times. Didn't happen.
      You think the Black Plague victims in medieval Europe didn't think they were living in the end times, when the world appeared to be self-destructing around them? You think the invasions of Genghis Kahn didn't make people think he was bringing on the end of the world? You think people in WWII didn't think that as Nazis swept thru Poland and the USSR?
      Historically informed people know that disasters have ALWAYS happened, and this end-times reasoning that nowadays it's worse and therefore presages the Second Coming is patent nonsense. I know this won't convince you; end-timers are never convinced by reason but rather by a book whose authors we don't know much about and which is misread constantly. Sigh.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:14 pm |
    • Humanist

      If God is love, God sure has a strange way of showing love. If God is good and in control as some have said, then this is not my God because God sure has an evil side, killing the children of Newtown and the people of Oklahoma in this most tragic event of nature. I believe that we all have a responsibility to be good and decent to each other and that's what will get us through, prayers will not go far without action.

      May 22, 2013 at 4:20 pm |
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47
Advertisement
About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.