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July 25th, 2013
01:12 PM ET

'Slum pope' visits Brazil's poor

By Eric Marrapodi, Shasta Darlington and Miguel Marquez, CNN
[twitter-follow screen_name='EricCNNBelief'] [twitter-follow screen_name='miguelmarquez'][twitter-follow screen_name='ShastaCNN']

Rio de Janeiro (CNN) - Pope Francis visited one of Rio de Janeiro's most dangerous and impoverished neighborhoods Thursday, saying that no society pushing the poor to the margins can succeed.

"I say: You are not alone; the church is with you; the pope is with you," Francis told residents of the notorious Varginha favela, or slum.

"I carry each of you in my heart, and I make my own the intentions that you carry deep within you: thanksgiving for joys, pleas for help in times of difficulty, a desire for consolation in times of grief and suffering."

Francis, whose concern for the poor has earned him the nickname the "slum pope" in Latin America, is in Brazil through Sunday for World Youth Day, a weeklong Catholic event.

Huge crowds have gathered wherever Francis goes, providing an early indicator of the new pope's immense popularity during his first overseas trip as leader of the Roman Catholic Church.

On Wednesday, Francis visited a shrine dedicated to the Virgin Mary and what he called "a shrine to suffering," a Rio hospital that treats drug addicts.

Francis traveled to Varginha on Thursday to deliver a speech on poverty, hope and social justice, steady themes thus far in his young papacy.

"Shortly after his election to the papacy, Pope Francis called for a 'church for the poor,' " said the Rev. Thomas Rosica, a Canadian priest who assists the Vatican communications department.  "His visit today ... offers us a unique opportunity to see the Bishop of Rome giving flesh and blood to those words."

The pope was driven to the favela in the open-air "popemobile," occasionally reaching out to touch the crowds. Women along the route thrust infants over the barricades for the pope to bless.

Volunteers linked arms to hold the crowd back in spots without barricades. Hundreds of military and police lined the route, and more than a dozen motorcycle officers followed.

[cnnvideo url='http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/world/2013/07/25/nr-marquez-pope-walks-brazil-soccer-stadium.cnn' inline='true']

Brazilian officials have voiced concern about the pope's security, upgrading it Wednesday to "high risk" after crowds swarmed a car carrying the pope shortly after his arrival two days earlier.

Security raised to 'high risk' for pope in Brazil

Varginha is deemed "occupied" by the Brazilian government after police took over the community last year, forcing out drug gangs who had controlled it for decades. Despite the heavy police presence, locals say the area remains dangerous after dark.

In Varginha, Francis stopped at a small stone Catholic chapel called San Girolamo Emiliani, where he said a short silent prayer, blessed a new altar and presented the community with a new chalice.

Outside, a group of children presented the pontiff with a soccer scarf from his favorite Argentine club.

From the chapel, he walked in the rain into a house and then to a soccer stadium, weaving from one side of the road to the other and greeting onlookers with a broad smile splashed across his face.

At the soccer stadium, a crowd of 3,000 gathered, including Marilene da Luz, a retired cashier who jumped up and down to the music playing.

“He’s such a humble man, it makes sense that he comes to the favelas; this is where the humble people are,” da Luz said.

Speaking in Portuguese, the pope told the rain-soaked capacity crowd he wanted to visit every house in Brazil and have a small coffee with people. But “no cachaca,” he joked, referring to the strong Brazilian liquor popular with the poor.

Francis addressed the crowd in plain language, telling them that even the poor have much  to offer.

"You can offer the world a valuable lesson in solidarity, a word that is too often forgotten or silenced, because it is uncomfortable,” the pope said.

Francis' visit comes after a month of antigovernment protests in Brazil that often turned violent. Protesters have cited their anger over corruption and lack of government services.

At Varginha, the pope seemed to speak directly to those concerns and was met with cheers.

"Brazil, there are many young people. Dear young friends, you have a particular sensitivity towards injustice, but you are often disappointed by facts that speak of corruption on the part of people who put their own interests before the common good," he said.

"To you and to all, I repeat: Never yield to discouragement; do not lose trust; do not allow your hope to be extinguished."

Pope Francis embarks on historic trip to Brazil

“No amount of ‘peace-building’ will be able to last, nor will harmony and happiness be attained in a society that ignores, pushes to the margins or excludes a part of itself,” he said.

“The measure of the greatness of a society is found in the way it treats those most in need, those who have nothing apart from their poverty!”

The pope stressed that a nation must be built on the fundamentals of life, family, education, health and security.

"Let us always remember this: Only when we are able to share do we become truly rich," he told the large crowd, including slum residents, gathered in the soccer stadium. "Everything that is shared is multiplied!"

Even in Varginha, a neighborhood where poverty, drugs and violence had run rampant, hope must continue, he said.

“Situations can change; people can change. Be the first to seek to bring good; do not grow accustomed to evil but defeat it.”

Later Thursday, the pope was to lead a religious service on Copacabana Beach, with upward of 1 million Catholics expected to attend.

CNN’s Barbara Arvanitidis, Hada Messia and Daniel Burke contributed to this report.

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Brazil • Catholic Church • Economy • Pope Francis • Poverty

soundoff (370 Responses)
  1. jazzguitarman

    A country’s infrastructure has to keep up with its population growth. When this doesn’t occur the people at the bottom suffer the worst. So while it is nice that the RCC assist the poor unless they also promote the use of artificial birth control, the assistance (i.e. the level of aid) will not be able to keep up with the population increase. I’m willing to listen to anyone that can explain how a society can reduce poverty without reducing births to a level consistent with infrastructure growth. Reducing births requires access too artificial birth control along with education on how to use it effectively.

    July 25, 2013 at 6:21 pm |
  2. Jenny

    Also, in addition to their charity giving, they also help members out more than you know. Helping them with medical costs, school tuitions and mortgage payments when people lose their jobs.

    July 25, 2013 at 6:08 pm |
  3. James Philip Arthur

    Glad to hear that the church is focusing on the poor and the needy. Let's also get the children some good education!

    July 25, 2013 at 5:55 pm |
    • jazzguitarman

      Should this education include how to plan for parenthood? Well studies have shown that the more educated someone is the more they plan with regards to childbirth. So if the RCC and this pope really care about the poor they should be promoting the use of artificial birth control.

      July 25, 2013 at 5:58 pm |
    • Damocles

      Yes, all of this focusing on the poor and needy leaves them... well... poor and needy.

      July 25, 2013 at 6:02 pm |
  4. Cesar Romero

    Pope Francis pointed out a serious and chronic problem of Brazil: impunity and corruption , and above all the deep abyss education lies on . With such a congress as we have no wonder why Brazil leads poverty in Latin America and the world. Our people are most illiterate and with no access to education and health policies. The Pope knows that and is concerned.

    July 25, 2013 at 5:49 pm |
    • jazzguitarman

      Unless the RCC is willing to educate the poor in how to plan for parenthood and promote the use of artificial birth control, they are not going to help the poor. Telling the poor it is god's will to have kids one cannot feed is NOT helping the poor.

      July 25, 2013 at 5:59 pm |
  5. wcnea567

    No doubt republicans hate this new pope.

    July 25, 2013 at 5:35 pm |
    • jazzguitarman

      Wrong, because this pope and the RCC still have backwards polcies with regards to se x ual issues. Note that US Catholics do NOT think as one. Some are Dems that are pro-choice (even if they wouldn't personally have an abortion), SSM and favor more aid for the poor etc.., while others don't favor aid for the poor but are against SSM, abortion and it the most extreme cases the use of birth control.

      July 25, 2013 at 5:41 pm |
  6. syed

    An organic great Christian. Love his words to the people. The first poor Pope.

    July 25, 2013 at 5:04 pm |
    • Doobs

      "the first poor pope".

      LOL.

      July 25, 2013 at 5:06 pm |
    • flying spaghetti monster

      "organic christian"? What is that supposed to mean?

      July 25, 2013 at 5:15 pm |
      • Doobs

        I think it means "full of manure".

        July 25, 2013 at 5:17 pm |
        • flying spaghetti monster

          That makes sense. And here I was thinking the OP was saying that he's not one of those icky GMO popes you see churned out by monsanto.

          July 25, 2013 at 5:24 pm |
        • Kevin

          How many wedgies did you guys get in high school? I'm guessing a lot.

          July 25, 2013 at 6:38 pm |
        • flying spaghetti monster

          @kevin

          I wonder if jeebus ever got a wedgie... maybe from one of the disciples as a prank after they'd drunk all of his booze-blood?

          July 25, 2013 at 6:50 pm |
    • Bill Deacon

      The wealth of the Church is probably impossible to calculate. The historic churches, shrines, monasteries, hospitals, homes and other holdings; the priceless art and libraries, not to mention the intellectual capital and value of political connection and influence of a 200 year old organization that essentially built western civilization. The pope himself is merely the temporal steward of these resources which detractors inflate while at the same time minimizing the likewise incalculable contribution in charity the Church makes. But the real treasures are these: Spiritually, the Bishops hold the keys to the kingdom of heaven and temporally they draw the hearts of the faithful. Hate all you want, the gates of hell shall not prevail against the Church built on the Rock.

      July 25, 2013 at 5:21 pm |
      • Bill Deacon

        2000

        July 25, 2013 at 5:22 pm |
      • Damocles

        You kind of contradicted yourself, yes? First the wealth of this church is 'impossible to calculate' and then that same wealth is 'inflated' by those who don't agree.

        July 25, 2013 at 5:30 pm |
        • Bill Deacon

          nice catch. I saw it too but too late. What I intend to say is that while the capitalized wealth of the Church is no doubt enormous, detractors act as if the Church is liquid or could be liquidated and the money spent. It's like saying you could give more to charity if you sold your house.

          July 25, 2013 at 5:35 pm |
        • Damocles

          Ahhh, yes, but if I live in a five bedroom house with just my wife, I could move into more reasonable housing, yes?

          July 25, 2013 at 5:43 pm |
        • jazzguitarman

          Bill, what the RCC should of done in places like LA was build a cheaper and more humble church instead of the one Mahoney wanted as a shine to him. Can you really defend a person like Mahoney based on the now open record of how he handled the children scandal and that way too expensive church?

          July 25, 2013 at 5:44 pm |
        • In Santa we trust

          "It's like saying you could give more to charity if you sold your house."

          True, and it is a difficult line to draw; however it is only a very loose analogy as the RCC has been around for 2000 years accumulating wealth and treasures. It didn't need to build a city for its own glorification or any of the lavish edifices. And then there's the treasure and investments. They come over as hypocrites even though they do some good works.

          July 25, 2013 at 5:45 pm |
        • Doobs

          @ ISWT

          It was necessary for the RCC to build its own little country so they can make their own laws, break them, then change them to suit. They can also hide criminals from other countries to avoid prosecution and the resulting negative press as well as accumulate and disseminate huge amounts of cash with virtually no accountability.

          July 25, 2013 at 6:19 pm |
    • Ed F.

      He's as rich as could be.

      July 25, 2013 at 5:22 pm |
  7. sparks2000

    the beast has been unleashed

    July 25, 2013 at 4:55 pm |
    • sparks2000

      Revelation 13

      July 25, 2013 at 4:57 pm |
    • flying spaghetti monster

      Who unleashed this beast?

      July 25, 2013 at 5:23 pm |
  8. open package

    Pope Francis seems like a good guy to be leader of the Catholic church. He is changing things that need to be changed and bringing the Catholic church into the 21st century while still maintaining Christ's teachings. I am glad he is challenging the cardinals to live more humbly, that is what they should have been doing all this time.

    July 25, 2013 at 4:54 pm |
    • Bill Deacon

      Amen

      July 25, 2013 at 5:12 pm |
    • jazzguitarman

      I see some very good character traits in this Pope compared to prior ones but that doesn't change my view that many of the RCC policies are harmful to society. The biggest one being that one cannot use artificial birth control. Planned parenthood is a useful and necessary step for all societies in addressing the conditions of the poor. Note another key is education. Well studies have shown that the more educated someone the more they plan with regards to childbirth. So if the RCC and this pope really care about the poor they should be promoting the use of artificial birth control.

      July 25, 2013 at 5:38 pm |
  9. CommonSensed

    ""I say: You are not alone; the church is with you, the pope is with you," Francis told residents of the notorious Varginha favela, or slum."

    Followed up by him asking them to line the offering plates with money.

    Pope mobiles aren't created like loaves and fishes, you know.

    July 25, 2013 at 4:51 pm |
  10. Christina Honigberg

    Bless the holy father reaching out to the poor .

    July 25, 2013 at 4:42 pm |
    • CommonSensed

      And asking them for money.

      July 25, 2013 at 4:51 pm |
  11. prophet

    we are praying for them all and forgive them all.

    July 25, 2013 at 4:30 pm |
    • Honey Badger Don't Care

      "We" aren't, YOU are.

      July 25, 2013 at 4:35 pm |
      • Unity 1-46934

        miss the unity of a good church

        July 25, 2013 at 4:55 pm |
        • Bill Deacon

          become a Catholic. We're as unified as it gets.

          July 25, 2013 at 5:29 pm |
        • Doobs

          We know, Bill Deacon. The RCC is so unified that you can be a child molester and if you get caught, no problem. The boss just sends you to a new place with fresh victims.

          The thin black line.

          July 25, 2013 at 6:13 pm |
      • TheSquintyNinja

        meh... that wasn't necessary at all

        July 25, 2013 at 4:56 pm |
  12. Honey Badger Don't Care

    Who could ever agree to a statement like this:

    "Secular schools can never be tolerated because such schools have no religious instruction, and a general moral instruction without a religious foundation is built on air; consequently, all character training and religion must be derived from faith. . . we need believing people."

    July 25, 2013 at 4:26 pm |
    • Athy

      Not me.

      July 25, 2013 at 4:28 pm |
    • CommonSensed

      Fans of Sharia Law.

      July 25, 2013 at 4:52 pm |
    • Bill Deacon

      George Washington

      July 25, 2013 at 4:53 pm |
      • Honey Badger Don't Care

        I'm glad you think so, it's a quote from Adolf Hitler.

        July 25, 2013 at 4:59 pm |
        • Bill Deacon

          You didn't ask who said it. You asked who would agree with it.

          July 25, 2013 at 5:11 pm |
    • Ray Charles

      I see what you did there.

      July 25, 2013 at 4:58 pm |
    • neoritter

      "Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens. The mere politician, equally with the pious man, ought to respect and to cherish them. A volume could not trace all their connections with private and public felicity. Let it simply be asked: Where is the security for property, for reputation, for life, if the sense of religious obligation desert the oaths which are the instruments of investigation in courts of justice ? And let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle."

      - excerpt from George Washington's Farewell Address 1796

      July 25, 2013 at 4:58 pm |
      • Bill Deacon

        Precisely neo. My compliments

        July 25, 2013 at 5:11 pm |
        • No theocracy in the land of the free

          Religiously informed values, as you put it, is what the Taliban is all about. It's in Saudi Arabia too. And when religion is used to "inform" a nation's policies, we have it slowly encroaching here too. You seem to be the one who is ignorant. And I'll fight you all...all the way. And, I actually believe in god. I will not accept your DOGMA andf DOCTRINE, however.

          July 25, 2013 at 5:36 pm |
        • Bill Deacon

          This seems odd. You believe in God so you must have religiously informed values. You may not call them "religious" but that is what they are. Yet you equate religiously formed values with Taliban like extremism. Are we to infer then that anyone who disagrees with your religion should consider you a "Taliban"?

          July 25, 2013 at 5:42 pm |
        • Damocles

          Maybe what he or she is saying is that it is fine to have your belief in an afterlife, but that does not allow you to try and dictate to everyone else how they should go about their business.

          July 25, 2013 at 5:47 pm |
        • Bill Deacon

          I don't think anyone in this thread has proposed that. I merely showed the similarity between something Hitler said and something Washington said. (with kudos to neoritter for the reference)

          July 25, 2013 at 5:49 pm |
      • No theocracy in the land of the free

        You want to play that game wity me:
        Thomas Jefferson: "In every country and every age, the priest has been hostile to liberty. He is always in alliance with the despot, abetting his abuses in return for protection to his own. It is easier to acquire wealth and power by this combination than by deserving them."

        July 25, 2013 at 5:29 pm |
        • Bill Deacon

          You're playing the wrong game. Neither Hitler nor Washington describe a theocracy. They espouse the value of religiously informed values among the people.

          July 25, 2013 at 5:32 pm |
        • Damocles

          @Bill

          Wow..... just.... wow.

          July 25, 2013 at 5:37 pm |
        • Bill Deacon

          Compare the two statements on religion Damocles. Essentially Hitler and Washington are both saying the same thing. That religious training is valuable to the nation. I'm not equating Washington with Hitler. To the contrary, I introduced Washington into the conversation to show how ridiculous Honey's attempt to conflate religious values with some form of totalitarian theocracy is. No one would consider Washington theocratic, yet Honey chooses to use a similar statement from a known pariah to make her point when the Father of our Country said basically the same thing.

          July 25, 2013 at 5:47 pm |
        • Damocles

          You are equating them, Bill, at least to some degree. You are saying that George and Adolf share the same religious views and, to you, that's a good thing.

          July 25, 2013 at 5:54 pm |
      • lionlylamb

        neoritter...

        The abnormalities of atheistic beliefs are in today's timelines littering profusely many cherished religious societies whose fundamentalisms have been a social consistency for many good years... Even though I am distasteful of today's religions in that they are usurping the least wealthy, I see their mismanaging of financial dexterities due each religion's hierarchies needing more money for themselves than for their communal poor folks...

        Any religion that feeds the least rich in their communities is, I guess, a good thing but what does any of the poor find gainful toward getting them into a better social condition no longer needing any handouts..? Could the poorest of the most poor lift themselves up above poverty on their own reasoning ways..? I have no resolute answers... Does anyone..?

        July 25, 2013 at 5:33 pm |
        • Bill Deacon

          The poor you will always have with you...

          July 25, 2013 at 5:39 pm |
  13. Doobs

    Bill Deacon,

    Please tell me what is "lunacy" about this question:

    How many state of the art hospitals did Mother Teresa build with the millions donated to her charities?

    You know the answer. You just don't want to admit it.

    July 25, 2013 at 4:13 pm |
    • Doobs

      Oops, misfire.

      July 25, 2013 at 4:13 pm |
    • Bill Deacon

      In 1952, she founded the first Home for the Dying in India. Later, she converted an unused Hindu temple into Kalighat Home for the Dying. People from all religions were accepted into Kalighat, where they would receive medical attention and care. She soon opened a home for lepers in Shanti Nagar. In 1955, Mother Teresa went ahead to open the Nirmala Shishu Bhavan, a home for the orphan and homeless children.
      The Missionaries of Charity established by Mother Teresa continued growing to reach different parts of India. It opened several orphanages and leper houses across India, and later, in different parts of the world. The first house of the Missionaries of Charity that was established outside India was the one in Venezuela, which was opened in 1965. By 2007, the Missionaries of Charity had established 600 missions, schools and homes in 120 nations and had thousands of nuns working for it.
      In 1962, Mother Teresa was awarded the Padma Shri, followed by the Jawaharlal Nehru Award for International Understanding in 1972 and the Bharat Ratna in 1980. She was honored with the Philippines-based Ramon Magsaysay Award for International Understanding in 1962.
      For her struggle to overcome poverty and remove the sorrow and suffering from society, she was awarded the Noble Prize for Peace. She selflessly donated an amount of $192,000 to India to be used for the upliftment of the poor in the country.

      People like you like to sit in the air conditioning and condemn her from the anonymity of the internet

      July 25, 2013 at 4:21 pm |
      • Doobs

        Bill Deacon,

        I didn't ask you how many Homes for the Dying and leper shelters she established, Those were cots on the ground, with few medical personnel and little medicine. Medical treatment was described by the editor of The Lancet as "haphazard", noting that there was no attempt to keep patients triaged appropriately, and that patients who might be curable were routinely placed with patients who had communicable diseases.

        I asked you how many state of the art hospitals she built with the millions of dollars that she collected for charitable purposes.

        Speaking of her awards, you forgot about the Légion d'honneur[ she received from Jean-Claude Duvalier, along with money stolen from the people of Haiti. She also took money from Charles Keating and Robert Maxwell.

        That Nobel Peace Prize money. She "selflessly" donated it to her own group, where it was funneled, like the rest of the funds she raised that was intended for charity work, into the Vatican's general account instead.

        July 25, 2013 at 4:46 pm |
      • Anna

        Thank you Bill Deacon. Keep up the good word!

        July 25, 2013 at 7:41 pm |
    • oh come on

      Well 25% of the entire world's healthcare comes from literally thousands Catholic hospitals, all of which serve the poor at rates they can afford.

      Is that the answer you were looking for?

      July 25, 2013 at 4:22 pm |
      • Honey Badger Don't Care

        You're a liar. If those were truely charitable organizations they would heal the sick for free. They're a business out to make a buck, only Catholic in name only.

        July 25, 2013 at 4:28 pm |
        • oh come on

          Not a liar at all. Unlike secular hospitals, they bill based upon a persons ability to pay.

          And yes 25% of all health care in the world comes from Catholic charities and hospitals.

          I know these facts don't line up with your bigoted beliefs, but you are welcome to do research, and educate yourself.

          July 25, 2013 at 4:31 pm |
      • sb

        That business is called proselytization to increase catholic numbers and make people feel morally wrong to go against them in future. There is a cure for ignorance, its called knowledge. To get that you need to educate yourself and learn to see from others standpoint.

        July 25, 2013 at 4:36 pm |
      • Alias

        Taking shots at Mother Teresa is really stupid.
        However, this is a gross exageration. An MRI is not given at rates the poor can afford anywhere, unless someone else is paying for it.
        Many of those so called christian hospitals use a christian name, but they are publicly funded and operated independently from the church.

        July 25, 2013 at 4:36 pm |
        • Doobs

          Why? She's the RCC's Patron Saint of Letting People Suffer Unnecessarily. When you have the financial capability to provide state of the art care for patients and you only provide three hots and a cot, that's immoral. Especially when your organization claims to be doing god's work.

          I'm surprised they haven't stuffed her and put her in Vatican Square so they can charge pilgrims to get their picture taken with her.

          July 25, 2013 at 4:57 pm |
      • OTOH

        @oh come on,

        The only hospital in my town is Catholic, and we are glad to have it. It was established and is supported financially (and otherwise) much more heavily by non-Catholics (even atheists) than by Catholics.

        Thank you for helping, but you don't get all of the credit.

        July 25, 2013 at 4:38 pm |
      • kgs

        How many of those 25% are operating in US of A ?. Do you have medical insurance for yourself or just drop by nearest catholic hospital if you are sick. You are too dumb to see the answer.

        July 25, 2013 at 4:39 pm |
        • oh come on

          There are about 600 in America. And yes, if you have the means and/or insurance expect to pay full boat. If not, you will pay based on your ability to do so.

          July 25, 2013 at 4:56 pm |
      • Doobs

        No, it wasn't.

        I asked how many hospitals Mother Teresa built with the millions she collected that was supposed to be used for charitable purposes and instead went into the Vatican's general fund. You gave me some random answer about RCC hospitals in general.

        You didn't answer the question.

        July 25, 2013 at 4:49 pm |
      • edgar lores

        Source?

        July 25, 2013 at 5:41 pm |
    • Bill Deacon

      Sorry Doobs, I just realized I didn't answer your question. The lunacy in asking how many state of the art hospitals Mother Theresa built is the same lunacy as asking how many hydroelectric dams Dr. David Livingston built.

      July 25, 2013 at 4:56 pm |
      • Doobs

        Bill Deacon

        What a disingenuous answer. You are a coward.

        July 25, 2013 at 5:02 pm |
        • Bill Deacon

          And you're a lunatic

          July 25, 2013 at 5:09 pm |
        • Doobs

          Bill Deacon

          Okay, let me phrase the question differently, disingenuous Bill.

          How many state of the art hospitals were built using the funds donated to Mother Teresa's charitable organizations?

          July 25, 2013 at 5:15 pm |
        • Doobs

          Bill Deacon runs away right on cue.

          July 25, 2013 at 6:09 pm |
    • John

      I was born into a Catholic family and left all religions behind 14 years later. I did finish 12 years of Catholic education, which was VERY solid and comprehensive. Although I dislilke proselytizing, I learned an interesting 'take it to the bank' fact about Catholic charities:it is this:because good and decent people who are priests and nuns take vows of poverty and are given only small allowances, Catholic charities in general deliver a far greater percentage of your donated dollar to the work you wanted done with it. No insult intended to other charities, it is an expense to involve people in charitable work-and those who sign-off on personal gain deliver more of it.

      July 25, 2013 at 5:24 pm |
      • Bill Deacon

        John, allow me to invite you back to the mass.

        July 25, 2013 at 5:37 pm |
  14. prophet

    all those on here who support the vatican and its clergy, just thank God that if you have children that they were not abused by tha catholic clergy and their supporters. The style of the vatican is to do these things and people say that if thye allowed the calergy to get married that this would not happen, but many of these clergy are abusers before they become catholic clergy, they just have somewhere they can hide.

    July 25, 2013 at 4:10 pm |
  15. Ivey

    Hope the pope will build a school/college to educate the children of the favela.

    July 25, 2013 at 4:09 pm |
    • Honey Badger Don't Care

      Don't hold your breath.

      July 25, 2013 at 4:10 pm |
    • Slum Pope Millionaire

      Not going to happen.

      July 25, 2013 at 4:16 pm |
    • Doobs

      They will build just as many schools there as they did hospitals in Calcutta when Mother Teresa was raking in millions for them.

      July 25, 2013 at 4:22 pm |
      • Kevin

        Doobs, read 'oh come on's post below. And then try to figure out if there's a way you can delete your post. You could probably edit it by deleting all the characters and then saving the edits as there may not be a "Delete Post" function. In any event, you should be embarrassed by your post if you care about truth. Oh, and lastly, good luck with figuring out how to delete your moronic post.

        July 25, 2013 at 6:43 pm |
        • Doobs

          Kevin, I'm not talking about more indoctrination camps. I'm talking about real, state of the art schools that teach the truth, not fairy tales.

          July 25, 2013 at 10:56 pm |
    • oh come on

      There are already over 30 Catholic universities in Brazil, all of which (like all Catholic universities) give generous scholarships to deserving people without the means to pay.

      July 25, 2013 at 4:32 pm |
  16. c

    The Pope could pawn a couple of those Vatican painitings or gold crosses and feed the whole country;for the next hundred years.

    July 25, 2013 at 4:09 pm |
    • neoritter

      Legally he can't, Italy has forbidden the exporting of many Vatican pieces of artwork and jewelry deemed to be museum pieces. And by exporting I mean can't leave the Vatican, remember it's its own country surrounded by Rome.

      July 25, 2013 at 5:04 pm |
      • neoritter

        I should also note, that you're ignoring the fact that the artworks and jewelry generate tourist money worth far more than the individual pieces combined.

        July 25, 2013 at 5:05 pm |
  17. taxedmore

    "Let us always remember this: Only when we are able to get somebody else's earnings, do we become truly rich,"

    July 25, 2013 at 4:04 pm |
    • Honey Badger Don't Care

      If the pursuit of money is the root of all evil then why does the church always ask for money?

      July 25, 2013 at 4:08 pm |
      • neoritter

        They always ask for money because they're always running in the red genius. You know from giving out most of their money for charitable causes.

        July 25, 2013 at 5:06 pm |
        • Doobs

          And here we thought that they spent it on fancy clothes, enormous cathedrals, art, jewelry and big palatial estates.

          July 25, 2013 at 6:07 pm |
    • Edward

      Be glad they are able to get money. Without it, they would have no choice but to come take it by force. Sometimes these situations can become extreme. Sometimes those that refused to share, were taken down to the city square and had their heads chopped off. Income disparity in out of control. The result is the current world you see. 47% can pay nothing into the system due to their low wages. It is so bad a full time worker, needs food stamps to feed himself. Seriously a $7.70 minimum wage in 2013? This is ridiculous. Look at the world today. This is what tax cuts for the wealthy has done. Isn't it beautiful? America and The Philippines have the same income disparity. (Gini coefficient) Welcome to the third world America.

      July 25, 2013 at 4:49 pm |
  18. Martino Silva

    All the cash the Vatican collect and the cost of the Pope visiting the poor could have feed them for years what he spends in a week.

    July 25, 2013 at 3:58 pm |
    • Honey Badger Don't Care

      Very true, how much did this trip for the pope cost? That money could definitely been spent on better things.

      July 25, 2013 at 4:09 pm |
      • Martino Silva

        O Globo reported that registrations for World Youth Day were expected to be in the neighborhood of 1 million to 2 million, with participant fees covering at least 70 percent of the total estimated cost of $140 million.

        Participants are being asked to pay fees ranging from $51 to $283, depending in part on whether they attend the full week of events or just the concluding vigil and Mass with the pope

        July 25, 2013 at 4:48 pm |
    • Bill Deacon

      Two easy steps to controlling the resources of a 2000 year old religion.

      1. Get your own 2000 year old religion
      2. Run it the way you see fit.

      July 25, 2013 at 5:26 pm |
      • Doobs

        Run it as you see fit? You mean like hiding criminals and laundering money?

        July 25, 2013 at 6:05 pm |
  19. prophet

    it is so obvious that the vatican is not doing what God Wants as they don't share out the millions with those that need it.

    July 25, 2013 at 3:58 pm |
    • Jenny

      Actually, the Church gives more to charity than any other organization in the world...read your facts before you comment.

      July 25, 2013 at 6:07 pm |
  20. prophet

    how many of us think that the next president is going make all the differece, There are no fools here.

    July 25, 2013 at 3:52 pm |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.