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September 9th, 2013
03:29 PM ET

Fox News host: Atheists 'don't have to live here'

By Daniel BurkeCNN Belief Blog Co-Editor
[twitter-follow screen_name='BurkeCNN']

(CNN) - Fox News pundit Dana Perino said she's "tired" of atheists attempting to remove the phrase "under God" from the Pledge of Allegiance, adding, "if these people really don't like it, they don't have to live here."

The co-host of Fox's "The Five" was referring to a suit brought by the American Humanist Association in Massachusetts, where the state's Supreme Judicial Court heard a challenge to the pledge on Wednesday.

The group's executive director, Roy Speckhardt, called the suit "the first challenge of its kind," but Perino begged to differ.

Perino, who was White House press secretary for George W. Bush from 2007-2009, said she recalled working at the Justice Department in 2001 "and a lawsuit like this came through."

The former Bush spokeswoman added that "before the day had finished the United States Senate and the House of Representatives had both passed resolutions saying that they were for keeping ‘under God’ in the pledge."

"If these people don't like it, they don't have to live here," Perino added.

David Silverman, president of the American Atheists, called Perino's comments "bigotry."

"I, for one, am tired of those Christians, like Ms. Perino, who think that equality is somehow un-American," Silverman said. "If Ms. Perino doesn't like being only equal, it is she who will have to leave America to some other country that doesn't value religious liberty."

READ MORE: Famous Atheists and Their Beliefs 

In 2002, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals sided with atheist Michael Newdow who argued that the words "under God" in the pledge amounted to an unconstitutional government endorsement of religion. The Supreme Court overturned that ruling.

Congress added the words "under God" in 1954 amid the red scare over the Soviet Union. In November 2002, after the Newdow ruling, Congress passed a law reaffirming "under God" in the pledge.

Greg Gutfeld, another co-host on "The Five," continued the discussion after Perino, saying the Pledge of Allegiance "is not a prayer, it's a patriotic exercise. In a sense, it's basically saying: Thanks for giving us the freedom to be an atheist."

The Massachusetts case, which was brought by an unidentified family of a student at a school in suburban Boston, will be argued on the premise that the pledge violates the Equal Rights Amendment of the Massachusetts Constitution.

READ MORE: Behold, the Six Types of Atheists

It is the first such case to be tried on the state level: All previous attempts have been argued in federal court on the grounds that "under God" was an unconstitutional violation of the separation of church and state.

CNN's Kevin Conlon contributed to this report.

- CNN Religion Editor

Filed under: Atheism • Belief • Church and state • Courts • Culture wars • News media • Schools • TV

soundoff (7,255 Responses)
  1. nick

    If I had the money I'd have been the hell out of here a decade ago. This country is filled with religious lunatics and I don't want anything to do with it.

    September 10, 2013 at 3:42 am |
  2. bk1024

    If the so-called Christians don't want to live in a free country, they can leave.

    September 10, 2013 at 3:24 am |
  3. Paul

    As an atheist, they have a right to disagree with "In God We Trust". And I, as a Christian, have the right to agree with it. Under this concept, me not stepping on their toes should also not have my toes stepped on. To remover those words is now stepping on my toes. If they don't like it, they have the right to say they disagree with those words and move on with their lives. But, they do not have a right as well to step on my Christian views. As for them leaving the country, they shouldn't have to. They have that right to not believe and we should honor that right. They will be judged by God for their views and beliefs. Not by me.

    September 10, 2013 at 3:19 am |
    • I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that

      It's a good thing he doesn't exist then, isn't it. By the way, how are your toes being stepped on by its removal?

      September 10, 2013 at 3:21 am |
      • mbluesky

        When people have something and it is taken away, that makes them feel like they have lost something. These symbols – a message on a coin, or a few words in a pledge support those who believe in God, but make atheists feel deliberately excluded. I'm a Christian and it will feel like a loss to me when those symbols of public support for my belief go away. But I'm also an American and I recognize that those words exclude other Americans. Non-believing Americans deserve to have their voices heard on this, even if I don't like losing a public acknowledgement that faith can bring us together.

        September 10, 2013 at 3:40 am |
        • skytag

          "even if I don't like losing a public acknowledgement that faith can bring us together."

          Faith only brings people of the same religious leanings together. Otherwise it tends to divide them.

          September 10, 2013 at 4:29 am |
    • skytag

      The government shouldn't take a stand on God, not even his existence. There are very, very few instances where the government does this. Refraining from mentioning God is not an endorsement of atheism, but references to God clearly endorse a belief in him.

      "To remover those words is now stepping on my toes."

      How so? I don't see how removing those words would limit your ability to practice your religious beliefs in any way.

      "But, they do not have a right as well to step on my Christian views."

      More evidence religion makes people both arrogant and stupid. On just what Christian views of yours would this step? I was a Christian for four decades. It was never my view that the government should promote the belief in a god. There's certainly nothing in the Bible suggesting that.

      "As for them leaving the country, they shouldn't have to. They have that right to not believe and we should honor that right."

      We should also have the right to not be exposed to endorsements of God originating from our government.

      "They will be judged by God for their views and beliefs. Not by me."

      Too bad there's no reason whatsoever to believe he exists.

      September 10, 2013 at 4:05 am |
  4. skytag

    I see the "fair and balanced" folks are up to their old tricks.

    September 10, 2013 at 3:18 am |
  5. john denver

    Ah, a public forum of soap boxers and unrepentant bigots amidst some good common sense. As far as the Fox commentator; what a knee-jerk and pandering statement. The belief in those words may not even be so ardent in private, which is a larger and distinct disgrace to this person.
    "Don't have to stay here" is, of course, a poorly concealed articulation of "leave if you are like me". That kind of garbage is rooted in feeling weak and striving to feel better through the control, exclusion or subjugation of other groups of often subtle distinction. It is a base and ugly component of human relations. It is tedious and awful for me to observe this baseless and utterly perjoratove mentality continuing to self-perpetuate throughout often privileged classes.
    In truth, this is ignorance and we do nothing about it because the belief button is solidly sacrosanct...I have not stated my opinion on matters of faith here; it does not matter.
    What matters is that we are better than this kind of Selma, AL and Frewd Phelps lunacy. How doesw America suffer for engaing and embracing its atheists? The belief in a pantheon of gods, Christ risen or no supreme being must fit within our national conversation. We must find common ground, common goals and create a common good or we are reduced to sectarian garbage like we are currently contending with in the wilds of humanity centered in the middle-East. This is minor, nothing. The words are part of ratings claptrap at best and the commentator is no person of substance if they truly adhere to this flim-flam bigotry. You long for the good old days that never existed; America had no classical or Golden period, just periods of rank repression and ignorance. Conflicting beliefs were always here and the founding fathers understood that the onion is a dangerous thing to peel...if we don't like atheists, then we don't like or welcome Catholicas, Jews, people of out own religious stripe; it never ends. Watch it...enjoy our freedom. It actually allows people who may shortly be in the minority to be in the public discourse and to be somewhat repsected rather than the object of outright contempt. Whatever your faith we are in it together, so tread lightly, good people.

    September 10, 2013 at 3:14 am |
    • john denver

      soory, "leave if you aren't like me"...probably already disected by academie francaise and the heritage society, opus dei etc...It's bed time, not a blue book test.

      September 10, 2013 at 3:19 am |
    • miscreantsall

      Pretty much well said, except:

      "Whatever your faith we are in it together, so tread lightly, good people."

      We are not good people. Humans (and especially us Americans) are liars, manipulators and contradictors.

      I am not an atheist but I am not religious. Religion (man made) has been the curse of mankind from the beginning (especially the "one god" religions).

      The "under god" and the "in god we trust" crap is exactly that……….crap. It is a contradiction that is rationalized over and over again with lies and manipulations and contradictions that undermine the founding principals of the genesis of this country.

      "God" could give a rats ass about the USA or Russia or a Baptist or a Jew or a winning athlete or a stupid Republican Senator or a gun yielding NRA idiot.

      "God" is a personal thing. "God" is not a thing that is wielded over others or imposed. When we finally get that, we will evolve into better human beings and realize we are "in it together"

      September 10, 2013 at 4:00 am |
  6. who?

    also everyone is always hating on the us for "hypocritical" behavior of saying we're for human rights an equality an ect... an then acting the total oppisite way but lighten up you just dont understand how anglo people operate..we may say anything to keep people calm but look if you or your country as something that we whant or that can benefit us, we're coming to collect mf'er... just ask the indians how we got the deed to this place ....bahahaha to sensitive these days ...

    September 10, 2013 at 3:05 am |
  7. krhodes

    "That's over 800 million people in one country. Your 2% figure is bogus. I'd say it's about 25% atheist/agnostic, 75% theist/deist/etc."

    I thought the discussion began with the population of the Earth...did someone change the name of the planet to China and i didn't get the memo?

    September 10, 2013 at 3:04 am |
    • I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that

      You really are a bit simple. Do the math.

      September 10, 2013 at 3:12 am |
    • brian

      Whatever the number is, it's growing. The figures for Europe are ahead of the figures in the USA, we actually are following their numbers. The issue I've read is the issue of so many churches tend to be very judgmental and drive off minority opinions in their groups.

      September 10, 2013 at 4:19 am |
  8. Foreverwar

    Fox Newsless channel spewing more hate, what a surprise.

    September 10, 2013 at 2:57 am |
  9. who?

    who cares about this stupid sht. . .all you little christians an atheist are like a bunch of wet pants childern . . .grow up once you get in the real world and quit spending your trust funds youll realize nobodys gives a "f" anyway an who even says the pledge anymore. . lmao

    September 10, 2013 at 2:55 am |
    • devin

      Say what?

      September 10, 2013 at 3:06 am |
      • who?

        yea thats right devin ... im guessing u must be the tough-guy/ know it all/ i blew my frat at yale on that crazy night after afew glasses of wine guy/ who goes back and adds there unwanted imput on everybodys post.... so lets get to it..come on, hit me with somethng run google/bing some wow stats and lets see whos the master-debater (its u)

        September 10, 2013 at 3:44 am |
        • devin

          Still. Say what?

          September 10, 2013 at 3:48 am |
        • G to the T

          Wow – you could paint a whole wall with a brush that broad...

          September 10, 2013 at 2:40 pm |
  10. menotyou

    Fake News at it again. I love how they all claim to be "Christians" yet none of them have ever exhibited Christ-like behavior in their lives. Come to think of it, neither has America, this so-called "Christian" country.

    September 10, 2013 at 2:50 am |
    • I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that

      Yep, America is definitely more of a Jewish nation, seeing as people seem to focus a lot more on the OT.

      September 10, 2013 at 2:51 am |
    • krhodes

      Why what Christ like behavior are you speaking of? BTW...i am so glad you have decided this country is not a Christian nation...now the secularist can take the blame for slavery, the treatment of the Indians, and so forth and so on.

      September 10, 2013 at 2:55 am |
  11. nullhogarth

    It seems to me that the conservative thing to do would be to stop saying the Pledge altogether, since it was only recognized by Congress in 1942, and was initially conceived and written in 1892 – long after the founding of the nation. Tradition thus has it that there was never intended to be a Pledge. I say we return to that tradition.

    September 10, 2013 at 2:49 am |
    • I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that

      I agree.

      September 10, 2013 at 2:50 am |
  12. Andre

    America = 5% atheists Most of Europe = more than 50% atheists

    One word....embarrassing.

    September 10, 2013 at 2:38 am |
    • Roger that

      The number is higher than that, but yes we are very far behind. I think it will drastically change over the next 20 years.

      September 10, 2013 at 2:41 am |
    • Mirosal

      and if you look at CNN's story of the happiest countries on Earth, guess where 8 of those 10 places are .... Hey, how about that, they are in Europe!!! What does that tell you?

      September 10, 2013 at 2:42 am |
      • krhodes

        Tells me maybe you should move to Europe? Seeing as how it is a much happier place to live and all.

        September 10, 2013 at 2:58 am |
        • I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that

          Too many lefties there.

          September 10, 2013 at 3:01 am |
        • Mirosal

          I've been there, courtesy of the United States Navy. All I'm saying is that these are places where religion plays a very small part in their lives, if any at all. Freedom to worship is held high in these places, but the majority of the pople in these places simply don't feel the need. They are living their lives as they see fit, and don't want or need some guy at a pulpit begging them for "donations" telling them how he thinks they should live.

          September 10, 2013 at 3:23 am |
        • skytag

          Ah, the suggestion we always here from closed-minded people who can't handle people questioning their views.

          September 10, 2013 at 4:35 am |
  13. Concrete

    Shocker! A faux Noozy spouts unAmerican drivel. Like that doesn't happen every day with those cretins!

    September 10, 2013 at 2:34 am |
  14. Observer

    The most entertaining part of Fox News is that they call themselves "fair and balanced".

    September 10, 2013 at 2:32 am |
    • Roger that

      The word "news" has no place in the network's name.

      September 10, 2013 at 2:38 am |
    • devin

      Both CNN and Fox news are equally unbridled in their biased political bent. Not to acknowledge the culpability in both of these media outlets is simply disingenuous.

      September 10, 2013 at 3:26 am |
      • skytag

        Claiming CNN is a liberal analogue of Fox News is most definitely disingenuous.

        September 10, 2013 at 4:36 am |
        • ElmerGantry

          And a false equivalentcy fallacy.

          September 10, 2013 at 5:06 am |
  15. devin

    We are closing in on 7 billion human beings populating this planet. Of those 7 billion, 98 % acknowledge the fact that we are the product of a creator/being infinitely superior to ourselves. It must, on some level, provide a sense of purpose to consider ones self esoteric in their atheistic world view, but it still must leave one scratching their head with the realization they embrace a relatively obscure ideology.

    September 10, 2013 at 2:25 am |
    • I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that

      First off, argumentum ad populum. Second, half of China alone is atheist, with about another quarter being Buddhist, which is mostly non-theistic. That's over 800 million people in one country. Your 2% figure is bogus. I'd say it's about 25% atheist/agnostic, 75% theist/deist/etc.

      September 10, 2013 at 2:30 am |
      • devin

        What you'd "say" is simply factually wrong.

        September 10, 2013 at 2:39 am |
        • I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that

          I'm estimating. On second thought, it's probably about 20%-80%. Still, more accurate than you.

          September 10, 2013 at 2:46 am |
      • krhodes

        I thought the discussion began with the population of the Earth...did someone change the name of the planet to China and i didn't get the memo?

        September 10, 2013 at 3:05 am |
        • devin

          It's called manipulating the numbers to bolster your view.

          September 10, 2013 at 3:08 am |
        • I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that

          No, it's called acknowledging that just under a fifth of the world's population is in China, where the majority is atheistic, so more than two percent of the world's atheists already exist in one country, rendering the number obsolete. I'd severely question somebody's reading comprehension if they couldn't figure that out.

          September 10, 2013 at 3:11 am |
    • Observer

      devin,

      "Of those 7 billion, 98 % acknowledge the fact that we are the product of a creator/being infinitely superior to ourselves"

      Wrong. FACTS can be proved. Even if there was a creator, that's no proof that the God of the Bible exists so this is all somewhat pointless.

      September 10, 2013 at 2:30 am |
      • devin

        But of course "prove" is determined by your particular definition.

        September 10, 2013 at 2:42 am |
        • I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that

          Not really. To prove something is to make it evident beyond doubt.

          September 10, 2013 at 2:43 am |
        • Jay

          In the case of a deity, any objective evidence that is not explained by natural phenomena, and points directly to said deity might have helped your case, but that small criterion seems to escape that (supposed) omnipotent, omniscient, omni-benevolent being.

          In fact, what exactly is god?
          You can say a creator,but that is a descriptive attribute that does not tell me what it is.
          You can say a father, but that is simply a relational attribute that does not tell me what it is.

          Your god has no primary attribute, so we do not even know what it is!

          September 10, 2013 at 4:23 am |
    • Mirosal

      Devin ... 98% acknowledge the "fact" that some higher being created us? Please list your surces for this fact. It's no fact at all, just a belief. Even if 98% have this belief, it doesn't make it a fact. And just where do you get this 98% figure from? List THAT source as well please.

      September 10, 2013 at 2:30 am |
      • devin

        Check any recent reliable survey and you will find that the consensus is that 2 to 2.5 % of the world's population consider themselves atheists ( This excludes those who have no religious affiliation). Do your homework before you post, it will prevent the appearance of foolishness.

        September 10, 2013 at 2:50 am |
        • Mirosal

          your figures are WAY off, it's closer to 20% ... and I'm still waiting for you to show us the "fact" that ther is some kind of extra-terrestrial creator. You'd be the first person in 4 billion of history to show us, so go ahead, make some history here.

          September 10, 2013 at 2:55 am |
        • I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that

          You cant' judge demographic studies which focus on censuses (is that how to pluralize it). People affiliate to a religion out of culture and tradition. Look at the UK. About 75% adhere to some religion on the census form, yet polls vary from about 6O-70 % being atheist/agnostic. Also, accurate demographics can't be gotten for largely atheist China, whose population is about 1.3 billion.

          September 10, 2013 at 3:00 am |
    • Bootyfunk

      "Of those 7 billion, 98 % acknowledge the fact that we are the product of a creator/being infinitely superior to ourselves"

      all you've shown is that you are allergic to facts, dummy. and at any rate, if 4 out of 5 people suddenly think brushing your teeth with toilet water is a good idea, does it actually make it a good idea? you are offering a logical fallacy called the Bandwagon Fallacy.

      September 10, 2013 at 2:35 am |
      • devin

        I'm trying to recall if the last time I heard someone use the term "dummy" was when I was in 7th or 8th grade.As for the name calling, I'll just consider the source.

        September 10, 2013 at 2:46 am |
    • nullhogarth

      "Acknowledge the fact" of a creator? There is no fact that proves that a creator exists, and thus there is no need to acknowledge one. Truth is not a popularity contest. Even if 100% of the population believed in a deity, that would be no proof of its existence. it would only mean 100% of humanity believed in something they cannot prove – like Santa Claus or the Easter Bunny.

      September 10, 2013 at 2:40 am |
      • devin

        "Truth is not a popularity contest", of which I would concur. At some point in time, common sense must enter into the equation.

        September 10, 2013 at 2:44 am |
      • Mirosal

        and common sense says that since none of the other 10,000 gods worshiped by man have been shown to be real, it stands to reason that yours is no different. See how easy common sense works?

        September 10, 2013 at 2:47 am |
        • devin

          But that common sense doesn't work. You are embracing the fallacy that says," because their are so many varying world views it is evident that one cannot be true." This is simply your illogical construct, common sense has nothing to do with it.

          September 10, 2013 at 3:00 am |
        • Mirosal

          I said nothing about varying world views. I only said that no god in human history has been shown to exist at all. Give us your proof that yours does.

          September 10, 2013 at 3:26 am |
    • Roger that

      Devin,

      Have you ever given 2 seconds of thought as to why you think there is a creator? Do you have one shread of evidence to support that claim? Just one example please.

      September 10, 2013 at 2:46 am |
      • devin

        No, I've never given it a seconds thought, I just nilly willy plucked it out of the air and thought, "Hmm, this looks like a good world view to base my life upon." If you develop a lucid thought/question that you would like to hear my response to, please do so.

        September 10, 2013 at 2:56 am |
        • Mirosal

          No god (in the 200,000 years that humans have been on this planet) has been shown to be real by any means of the word. Why would your god be any different? Don't tell us what your beliefs are, show us your incontrivertible evidence that would hold up in a court as it pertains to established rules of evidence.

          September 10, 2013 at 3:03 am |
        • devin

          I would suggest you continue to embrace your atheism, Christianity will never provide you with the physically observable, quantifiable, lab room proof you desire. You, et al, have created a paradigm in which you have determined empirical evidence to be the only criteria for determining truth.

          September 10, 2013 at 3:13 am |
        • Mirosal

          so the "truth" for you would be a 2,000 year old book, filled with the variations of 3,000 year old stories, written in languages that are no longer spoken, for societies that no longer exisst?

          September 10, 2013 at 3:18 am |
        • devin

          Yes, that would be a significant portion.

          September 10, 2013 at 3:28 am |
        • Mirosal

          I'm also still waiting for you to show us the "fact" that some god created us. And do it without using any religious texts, as their origins are highly suspect and cannot be verified. Otherwise, it's just a hypothesis.

          September 10, 2013 at 3:35 am |
        • Roger that

          Christianity can never be proven to be true. The only way to except something that isn't true or that can't be proven is through faith. Your religion is no more true than any of the thousands before it. Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Christianity all require faith. You easily discard the other religions as false, when yours is no different. Atheists feel the same about your religion as you feel about other religions. More than likely, your "choice" of religion is a result of your parents and your birthplace. You would not be a Christian in China. What kind of evil god is going to punish people simply for the place they happen to be born?

          September 10, 2013 at 3:45 am |
        • devin

          But I accept my "religious text" as factual, which is why what you consider to be simply a hypothesis is what I considerfact.. It's a circular argument .

          September 10, 2013 at 3:47 am |
        • Mirosal

          your book is true because your book says it's true? You're right, it's the perfect circle. Like a zero, because that's your score for using that argument. Thanks for playing, you don't win the year's supply of Turtle Wax or the Rice-A-Roni, the San Francisco treat. .. next contestant please.

          September 10, 2013 at 3:52 am |
        • devin

          I wish you would have revealed your childishness earlier, it would have saved me some time.

          September 10, 2013 at 3:55 am |
        • Mirosal

          Ttlling me your book is true because your book says it's true is the childish argument. You said that it was a fact that some deity created us. I'm asking you to show us the relieble, credible source or evidence that made that statement a fact.

          September 10, 2013 at 3:59 am |
    • Roger that

      I'll wait here while you go get your banana.

      September 10, 2013 at 2:53 am |
    • Michael

      Even if we pretend your numbers are correct (also assuming there is a god), once you break it down to all of the different beliefs the odds of "Your" god being the correct one are not too good. It is interesting that most agnostics and atheists believe that since we only have this life, it should be lived to the best and fullest of our (human) capability, whilst most religious people I know are more concerned with the next one and don't live up to what their religion says they should do while they are here (the whole not judging thing and treating people kindly even if you don't like them..... the little things).

      September 10, 2013 at 3:04 am |
      • devin

        First, they are not "my numbers" and they "are correct." Second, now that you comprehend the enormous numbers disparity between atheists and theists it should come as no surprise that you would come across a greater number of Chrisitans who are not always consistent with their world view.

        September 10, 2013 at 3:23 am |
    • skytag

      I don't think it's 98%, but even if it is, what's your point? Did you even have one?

      September 10, 2013 at 4:38 am |
    • skytag

      "Of those 7 billion, 98 % acknowledge the fact that we are the product of a creator/being infinitely superior to ourselves."

      Lame. First, this is not a fact, it's a belief. If you weren't brainwashed you'd know the difference. Second, I doubt seriously it's 98%. Finally, whatever the percentage is there is nothing all of their beliefs have in common. The simplest explanation for that is that all religions are just products of people's imaginations. With no actual god or gods on which to base them these belief systems are all over the map.

      September 10, 2013 at 5:27 am |
  16. Dapple

    We played mad lib with the pledge of allegiance growing up. lol. We've all said it enough times we didn't much care anymore lol.

    September 10, 2013 at 2:20 am |
  17. gstlab3

    I say if you do not like American values you can move to China or North Korea or go back to what we have in the middle east where everyone hates everyone else who is not just like them.
    I will not be oppressed in America ever again in the name of equality or for someone elses feelings that might get hurt when I or other people think and believe something other than what they they do.
    You have the right to be offended and to shut up about it if you do'nt like it.,
    In other words "f" off.

    September 10, 2013 at 2:02 am |
    • I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that

      Exactly. Christian fundies everywhere, please f off.

      September 10, 2013 at 2:07 am |
    • Michael

      I bet you would feel different about that if Congress changed the phrase to ""Under Allah"!!!!

      September 10, 2013 at 2:23 am |
    • nullhogarth

      Since when was it an American value to force your religion down peoples' throats? Take your stupid god out of the pledge.

      September 10, 2013 at 2:43 am |
    • DOG

      gstlab3 The exact same can be said about you and yours!

      September 10, 2013 at 2:51 am |
    • Michael

      Ummm...American values are not and should not be dictated by Christians and, by the way, America was not founded on, or by Christian values. America (the colonies) was founded by religious folks (Puritans) fleeing other religious folks that did not share their beliefs. Than, those religious folks tried to convert,wipe out, and then enslave the indigenous people of the land. That said, please explain again why agnostics and/or atheists are the bad guys?

      September 10, 2013 at 3:40 am |
    • skytag

      What a self-centered, arrogant jerk.

      September 10, 2013 at 4:40 am |
  18. loudmusic

    Okay. We get it. Islamic extremism-bad. American Christian fundamentalism-good.

    Fox News–Still the best long-running comedy series on cable TV. That's entertainment, folks.

    September 10, 2013 at 1:55 am |
  19. jajajajaaj

    if atheist would have said "religious people do not have to live here" this would have been applauded. it is trendy to hate on religion today

    September 10, 2013 at 1:48 am |
    • Blessed are the Cheesemakers

      Ummm....no, religion, nor belief should be legistated for or against....ever.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:49 am |
      • I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that

        It depends what one means by belief. Interpreting the operation of an economy is based on belief. As much as I hate it, I wouldn't abolish liberal (small L, I'd love some old school Liberalism) economics.

        September 10, 2013 at 1:57 am |
        • copanut

          Supernatural belief, of course.

          September 10, 2013 at 1:58 am |
        • I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that

          Obviously I know, I'm just pointing out that one should clearly differentiate. It's like when somebody says conservative when they mean Christian conservative. I'm a conservative but I don't hate gays or deny evolution.

          September 10, 2013 at 2:01 am |
        • Mirosal

          I'm a social liberal, a fiscal consservative, and an Atheist with a Catholic background and education. We don't need a "tea party" in politics, we need a Long Island iced tea party in politics. And as far as Fox news is concerned, they need to change their name and logo. It should be Faux "News". The quotation marks are intentional as they have yet to offer any actual newscast, instead going for pure commentary.

          September 10, 2013 at 2:25 am |
        • Blessed are the Cheesemakers

          Dave,

          Doesn't matter what you are talking about. You can't control thought.

          September 10, 2013 at 8:47 am |
    • Bootyfunk

      no, it's trendy for religious people to say they're being picked on when they hear an opinion different from their own. 75% of the country is christian, but you're being picked on? LOL.

      September 10, 2013 at 2:37 am |
    • skytag

      Attacks based on what you claim would happen in a fictional scenario are about as lame as it gets.

      September 10, 2013 at 4:41 am |
  20. Nick lavers

    People need to understand its about tradition not religion.

    September 10, 2013 at 1:39 am |
    • I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that

      A tradition invented in the fifties during the Second Red Scare.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:42 am |
    • Blessed are the Cheesemakers

      I take it you are for its removal then since "traditionally" it was added later....right?

      September 10, 2013 at 1:48 am |
    • Truth Speaks

      Traditionally, blacks are forbidden to marry whites, and women should all be on there backs popping out full blooded American children. AMRITE AMURICA?

      September 10, 2013 at 1:52 am |
    • tallulah13

      Tradition should be respected here. Remove the "under god" and let the pledge return to it's original form.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:55 am |
      • Dippy

        Its, not it's.

        September 10, 2013 at 2:10 am |
        • tallulah13

          I have always had problems with the whole "it's"/ "its" thing. Also effect and affect. English is a wacky language.

          September 10, 2013 at 2:23 am |
    • skytag

      Traditions change. The pledge didn't even exist until 1892 and didn't contain the words "under God" until 1942. Why should this version be set in stone in the interest of tradition?

      September 10, 2013 at 4:43 am |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.