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September 9th, 2013
03:29 PM ET

Fox News host: Atheists 'don't have to live here'

By Daniel BurkeCNN Belief Blog Co-Editor
[twitter-follow screen_name='BurkeCNN']

(CNN) - Fox News pundit Dana Perino said she's "tired" of atheists attempting to remove the phrase "under God" from the Pledge of Allegiance, adding, "if these people really don't like it, they don't have to live here."

The co-host of Fox's "The Five" was referring to a suit brought by the American Humanist Association in Massachusetts, where the state's Supreme Judicial Court heard a challenge to the pledge on Wednesday.

The group's executive director, Roy Speckhardt, called the suit "the first challenge of its kind," but Perino begged to differ.

Perino, who was White House press secretary for George W. Bush from 2007-2009, said she recalled working at the Justice Department in 2001 "and a lawsuit like this came through."

The former Bush spokeswoman added that "before the day had finished the United States Senate and the House of Representatives had both passed resolutions saying that they were for keeping ‘under God’ in the pledge."

"If these people don't like it, they don't have to live here," Perino added.

David Silverman, president of the American Atheists, called Perino's comments "bigotry."

"I, for one, am tired of those Christians, like Ms. Perino, who think that equality is somehow un-American," Silverman said. "If Ms. Perino doesn't like being only equal, it is she who will have to leave America to some other country that doesn't value religious liberty."

READ MORE: Famous Atheists and Their Beliefs 

In 2002, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals sided with atheist Michael Newdow who argued that the words "under God" in the pledge amounted to an unconstitutional government endorsement of religion. The Supreme Court overturned that ruling.

Congress added the words "under God" in 1954 amid the red scare over the Soviet Union. In November 2002, after the Newdow ruling, Congress passed a law reaffirming "under God" in the pledge.

Greg Gutfeld, another co-host on "The Five," continued the discussion after Perino, saying the Pledge of Allegiance "is not a prayer, it's a patriotic exercise. In a sense, it's basically saying: Thanks for giving us the freedom to be an atheist."

The Massachusetts case, which was brought by an unidentified family of a student at a school in suburban Boston, will be argued on the premise that the pledge violates the Equal Rights Amendment of the Massachusetts Constitution.

READ MORE: Behold, the Six Types of Atheists

It is the first such case to be tried on the state level: All previous attempts have been argued in federal court on the grounds that "under God" was an unconstitutional violation of the separation of church and state.

CNN's Kevin Conlon contributed to this report.

- CNN Religion Editor

Filed under: Atheism • Belief • Church and state • Courts • Culture wars • News media • Schools • TV

soundoff (7,255 Responses)
  1. Rita

    We should go back to the original pledge, written as the forefathers intended.

    It did not include the words, "Under God." That phrase was added by Congress in the 1950s.

    The forefathers believed in religious freedom. They were not a self-righteous, preachy or terribly religious. They were generally freedom enthusiasts.

    Hence the original pledge had no reference to God, Allah, voodoo, crystal balls or any other mystical creations of the human mind.

    Look it up:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pledge_of_Allegiance

    September 10, 2013 at 10:13 am |
    • Amanda

      Agree...it is
      "I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."

      September 10, 2013 at 10:42 am |
  2. ART

    She not only a bigot she as dumb as slug

    September 10, 2013 at 10:13 am |
    • Observer

      Please leave Sarah Palin out of this.

      September 10, 2013 at 10:14 am |
    • Hey! You!

      That's an insult to slugs.

      September 10, 2013 at 10:17 am |
  3. CommonSense

    Another ignorant Fox dimwit on the Republican Propaganda network. The TV station created to scare old white people.
    Right, she doesn't know what "secular" means, where the pledge of allegiance came from or how it was altered during the insane McCarthy era (a true mentally ill America cretin).
    Pledges are things children do on the playground. The entire "pledge" should be abandoned because it is meaningless nationalist authoritarian nonsense talk.
    Time for the right-wing American Taliban to be deported to Saudi Arabia, where they belong.
    Poor America, where the average adult has the mentality of a child.

    September 10, 2013 at 10:13 am |
  4. Observer

    No one should have to involve any religion or atheism or agnosticism when they want to pledge their allegiance to our nation.

    September 10, 2013 at 10:12 am |
    • Kat

      THANK YOU

      September 10, 2013 at 10:17 am |
    • Paco

      No matter what you are, we are talking about the pledge to defend and protect this country as citizens. I was taught that no matter who or what you god is or your beliefs are, you should still be reverent to what matters the most. Tommorrow is the anniversary of 9-11 and those people did not have a choice. It is up to us that are still here today to defend this country and unite together. And if the word "god" is used and represents the majorities and our hopes and dreams for this country then move elsewhere because you do not like it. Our founding fathers were prepared to defend this country based on their beliefs. Also do not push your social agenda to change what we have believed in since day one. I have a right to chose as well as any atheist, but just shut your mouth and move on, We have bigger issues than this to combat in this country-starvation, murder, gangs, violence, drugs.........

      September 10, 2013 at 10:24 am |
      • tallulah13

        The fact that you defend the add-on 'under god' because it is the belief of the majority is yet another reason it should be removed. This is a nation based on the rights of the individual. No one single religion should be given preference over any other. Religious bullying is exactly why fanatics hijacked planes and flew them into buildings.

        September 10, 2013 at 11:06 am |
      • Truth Quester

        Paco, you should read the Bill of Rights. Read the part that talks about a wall of separation between church and state. The Pledge of Allegiance was originally an oath of loyalty to the national flag and the republic of the United States of America. That is it! In 1954 Congress decided to add the words, "under God" to the Pledge. Which was a mistake! The Pledge is now both a patriotic oath and a public prayer, which lifts the wall of separation.

        September 10, 2013 at 11:53 am |
  5. jimmy

    i'm just glad we had a christian president, her ex-boss george w bush, to do christian things like bombing all those children in iraq

    September 10, 2013 at 10:11 am |
    • Kat

      And I'm just glad we have people like you who think you know everything about being a Christian. This is why people who don't believe in God get a bad rep. When you speak with ignorance, you don't make yourself look any better than the people you're trying to make fun of.

      September 10, 2013 at 10:16 am |
      • cedar rapids

        sure because its not as if there are any rules or commandments about killing in the christian religion that people can point to about how christians are supposed to act.

        September 10, 2013 at 10:19 am |
      • doobzz

        Many of the non believers here were raised in religious homes and probably know the bible better than you.

        September 10, 2013 at 10:20 am |
  6. Tatjana

    If Christians don't like Roe vs Wade, they don't have to live here.

    September 10, 2013 at 10:11 am |
  7. zaphed

    I just dont like it when people tell me I dont have to live here. I have every right to live here. This is the country of freedoms from anything including religions.

    September 10, 2013 at 10:11 am |
    • doobzz

      That whole "America – love it or leave it!" mentality is how the words "under God" got in there in the first place.

      September 10, 2013 at 10:21 am |
  8. The Five

    This is what happens when the tail's wagging the dog!

    September 10, 2013 at 10:11 am |
    • Ryan

      Every dog needs a tail 😉

      September 10, 2013 at 10:12 am |
      • A Dose of Reality

        Every dog has his day!

        September 10, 2013 at 10:14 am |
  9. kentton77

    One lady is tired of them (Atheists) because 12 years ago she worked for the justice department right after the 9/11 attack. Senate and "House of Representative" (only one representative I assume) both passed resolutions at that time to keep God in the Pledge of Allegiance. If her point wasn't already weak, she added in that they can move if they don't like it. Some ass said good point after that and I started laughing. The other woman asks "Why should some people be catered to? What makes them special?" (Same reason why women have the right to vote?) Not really sure why she thinks that the court is catering to these people. Why are these two women in the news box? They both speak of being offended and tired. Neither give any real factual or solid reason to oppose the challenge in the court room without "feeling" that this is a personal attack. How about getting real intellectuals in the conference instead of a bunch of halfwits who sell personal feelings and speculation as a "solid discussion."

    September 10, 2013 at 10:10 am |
    • Commentator

      Yes, it speaks badly for the citizens who elected them to office.

      September 10, 2013 at 10:14 am |
  10. AtheistFools

    Maybe atheists should leave and go join Muslims.

    September 10, 2013 at 10:09 am |
    • Thinker...

      So you want the US to be for Christians only? Have fun re-writing the consti tution and getting it ratified.

      September 10, 2013 at 10:12 am |
    • Mike D

      Maybe you can go and join your brain, if you have one.

      September 10, 2013 at 10:13 am |
    • A Dose of Reality

      Actually, it seems more appropriate that Christians leave and join the Muslims. After all, you have much more in common with them then atheists. And your halfwitted rebuttal is?

      September 10, 2013 at 10:13 am |
    • Hey! You!

      TROLL ALERT

      September 10, 2013 at 10:14 am |
  11. Orthodox Christians

    Some ardent and Orthodox Christians, as well as Jehova Witnesses, and some Pentecostal Christian groups feel that the Pledge of Allegiance is actually a SIN against God. Because you are pledging allegiance to a flag and nation, that will never automatically be equivalent or always do the Will of God. It is roughly equivalent to idolatry worship to these groups.

    Funny thing is, its the Christians who want to keep it in, but the strictest Christians find it conflicting with their religion.

    September 10, 2013 at 10:09 am |
    • Kat

      I've never heard of any Pentecostal group saying anything of the sort about the pledge of allegiance. And, being a devout Pentecostal myself, I'm sure I have the experience to rebut this. The pledge of allegiance does not overpower your ability to be devoted to God. I'd like some type of source for where you got your information with regards to Pentecostals.

      September 10, 2013 at 10:13 am |
  12. I believe in Zeus

    If this nation didn't have atheists, it would not have had Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Paine, Abraham Lincoln, Goerge Washington, Albert Einstein, and 93% of all scientists in the country. Christianity has given us Sarah Palin, the KKK, slavery, and the degredation of females. Which team would you want to play for?

    September 10, 2013 at 10:09 am |
    • agnostics mostly

      you're confusing agnostics with atheists... two different belief systems... and most of the people you named are agnostics (or maybe closer to Diests).

      September 10, 2013 at 10:10 am |
      • I believe in Zeus

        Depends on your definition of Atheist. Its real meaning is a-theist – meaning the opposite of a theist, which is one who doesn't believe that any religion is correct. A deist believes in a God – an adeist believes there is no god. And you are right – most of those guys were deists – but if they had access to Darwin, Einstein, el al. back then – there is no way they wouldn't have taken the next step of becoming an atheist.

        September 10, 2013 at 10:14 am |
      • Thinker...

        Technically agnosticism and athiesm are not two different beliefs, they both deal with a different area. An agnostic means not knowing gnostic means knowing. Athiest means does not believe claims of the existance of a god, theist means believes in the existance of a god.

        One can be:
        an agnostic athiest (most athiests fall in this category; I do not believe in any of the gods that I have head of but I do not claim to know that no god exists.)

        an agnostic theist (basically a deist, I believe there is a god but have now personal knowledge of this god.)

        a gnostic athiest (one who claims to know that no god exists which would include gods they have never heard of.)

        a gnostic theist (the vast majority of theists claim direct knowledge of their god/s and fall in this category.)

        September 10, 2013 at 10:21 am |
      • Spuds Mackenzie

        Agnosticism and Atheism are compatible. Agnostics think that there is no evidence of a God. Athiests believe that there is no God. I don't think many Atheists can say for a fact that there is no God, just as much as they can say there are no Unicorns. It's virtually impossible to disprove the existence of something that is not seen and cannot be studied. Therefore most Atheists, myself included, don't see any evidenced of a supernatural being and can call themselves Agnostic, but at the sametime believe that there is probably no God and, therefore, Atheist.

        September 10, 2013 at 10:21 am |
    • AtheistFools

      Albert Einstein was not an atheist.

      September 10, 2013 at 10:13 am |
      • I believe in Zeus

        Sorry – yes he was. Brought up Jewish. Then he characterized himself as a Pantheist – which means that he beieved that the term "God" and "the Universe" are interchangable. That we are ruled by certain things, such as the Theory of Evolution, the Laws of Physics, etc. He thought that theism was nonsense.

        September 10, 2013 at 10:18 am |
      • Observer

        “The word god is for me nothing more than the expression and product of human weaknesses, the Bible a collection of honourable, but still primitive legends which are nevertheless pretty childish. No interpretation no matter how subtle can (for me) change this. … For me the Jewish religion like all others is an incarnation of the most childish supersti-tions.”
        - Albert Einstein, letter 1/3/1954

        September 10, 2013 at 10:19 am |
      • PennyK

        He didn't believe in a personal God either. When he used the word "God" he just meant the laws that govern the universe.

        September 10, 2013 at 10:22 am |
      • doobzz

        Wrong again. Einstein corrected that misperception himself when asked.

        September 10, 2013 at 10:28 am |
  13. A Dose of Reality

    No matter how you dress it up, there are some fundamental difficulties with Christianity that are pretty hard to overcome.
    1. At its most fundamental level, Christianity requires a belief that an all-knowing, all-powerful, immortal being created the entire Universe and its billions of galaxies 13,720,000,000 years ago (the age of the Universe) sat back and waited 10,000,000,000 years for the Earth to form, then waited another 720,000,000 years for human beings to gradually evolve, then, at some point gave them eternal life and sent its son to Earth to talk about sheep and goats in the Middle East. While here, this divine visitor exhibits no knowledge of ANYTHING outside of the Iron Age Middle East, including the other continents, 99% of the human race, and the aforementioned galaxies. Either that, or it all started 6,000 years ago with one man, one woman and a talking snake. Either way “oh come on” just doesn’t quite capture it.
    2. This ‘all loving’ god spends his time running the Universe and spying on the approximately 7 billion human beings on planet Earth 24 hours a day, seven days a week. He even reads their minds (or “hears their prayers”, if you see any difference) using some kind of magic telepathic powers. He also keeps his telepathic eye on them when they are not praying, so as to know if they think bad thoughts (such as coveting their neighbor) so he knows whether to reward or punish them after they die.
    3. Having withheld any evidence of his existence, this god will then punish those who doubt him with an eternity burning in hell. I don’t have to kill, I don’t have to steal, I don’t even have to litter. All I have to do is harbor an honest, reasonable and rational disbelieve in the Christian god and he will inflict a grotesque penalty on me a billion times worse than the death penalty – and he loves me.
    4. The above beliefs are based on nothing more than a collection of Bronze and Iron Age Middle Eastern mythology, much of it discredited, that was cobbled together into a book called the “Bible” by people we know virtually nothing about, before the Dark Ages.
    5. The stories of Christianity are not even original. They are borrowed directly from earlier mythology from the Middle East. Genesis and Exodus, for example, are clearly based on earlier Babylonian myths such as The Epic of Gilgamesh, and the Jesus story itself is straight from the stories about Apollonius of Tyana, Ho.rus and Dionysus (including virgin birth, the three wise men, the star in the East, birth at the Winter solstice, a baptism by another prophet, turning water into wine, crucifixion and rising from the dead).
    6. The Bible is also literally infested with contradictions, outdated morality, and open support for the most barbarous acts of cruelty – including, genocide, murder, slavery, r.ape and the complete subjugation of women. All of this is due to when and where it was written, the morality of the times and the motives of its authors and compilers. While this may be exculpatory from a literary point of view, it also screams out the fact that it is a pure product of man, bereft of any divine inspiration.
    7. A rejection of the supernatural elements of Christianity does not require a rejection of its morality. Most atheists and secular humanists share a large amount of the morality taught today by mainstream Christianity. To the extent we reject Christian morality, it is where it is outdated or mean spirited – such as in the way it seeks to curtail freedoms or oppose the rights of $exual minorities. In most other respects, our basic moral outlook is indistinguishable from that of the liberal Christian – we just don’t need the mother of all carrots and sticks hanging over our head in order to act in a manner that we consider moral. Falsely linking morality to a belief in the supernatural is a time-tested “three card trick” religion uses to stop its adherents from asking the hard questions. So is telling them it is “wrong to doubt.” This is probably why there is not one passage in the Bible in support of intelligence and healthy skepticism, but literally hundreds in support of blind acceptance and blatant gullibility.
    8. We have no idea of who wrote the four Gospels, how credible or trustworthy they were, what ulterior motives they had (other than to promote their religion) or what they based their views on. We know that the traditional story of it being Matthew, Mark, Luke and John is almost certainly wrong. For example, the Gospel of Matthew includes a scene in which Jesus meets Matthew, recounted entirely in the third person!! Nevertheless, we are called upon to accept the most extraordinary claims by these unknown people, who wrote between 35 to 65 years after Christ died and do not even claim to have been witnesses. It is like taking the word of an unknown Branch Davidian about what happened to David Koresh at Waco – who wrote 35 years after the fact and wasn’t there
    .9. When backed into a corner, Christianity admits it requires a “leap of faith” to believe it. However, once one accepts that pure faith is a legitimate reason to believe in something (which it most certainly is not, any more than “faith” that pixies exist is) one has to accept all other gods based on exactly the same reasoning. One cannot be a Christian based on the “leap of faith” – and then turn around and say those who believe in, for example, the Hindu gods, based on the same leap, got it wrong. In a dark room without features, any guess by a blind man at the direction of the door is as valid as the other 359 degrees. Geography and birthplace dictates what god(s) one believes in. Every culture that has ever existed has had its own gods and they all seem to favor that particular culture, its hopes, dreams, and prejudices. Do you think they all exist? If not, why only yours? Faith is not belief in a god. It is a mere hope for a god, a wish for a god, no more substantial than the hope for a good future and no more universal than the language you speak or the baseball team you support.

    September 10, 2013 at 10:08 am |
    • I believe in Zeus

      I found it ironic that despite being able to create billions of galaxy's with billions of stars with billions of other planets, He forgot to tell the Apostles that electricity existed, forgot to give them the blue pritns to a printing press, and apparently, does not know how to use Twitter to announce "Hey yo!!! I am real!!!!"

      September 10, 2013 at 10:11 am |
    • Spuds Mackenzie

      Best post ever.

      September 10, 2013 at 10:14 am |
    • NateC

      ...Thank you very much. It's hard to adequately sum up reasons why I'm an agnostic/atheist. This does it pretty well.

      September 10, 2013 at 10:26 am |
      • Truth Quester

        There are countless reasons not to believe in god or the bible, but for me it was the idea that your belief in said god is all that really matters to him. It doesn't matter how you treat people on this earth. Who cares how many times you break the 10 commandments, because there is a loophole. As long as you repent and turn to god before death your sins will be washed away through the blood of Jesus and you will make it to heaven. That tells me if Jesus really does exist he or she or it does not care about the people or quality of life on this planet. Therefore I am morally superior to the god that I am supposed to worship. Sorry can't do it...

        September 10, 2013 at 11:18 am |
    • Commentator

      And don't forget that an omnipotent God would know and control *everything* in the universe. Every single detail in the universe would be predetermined and by God's doing including all the stuff he supposedly didn't like! Forcing some lowly human to burn in Hell for all eternity for not believing the *correct* fairy tale?...sure sounds like the actions of an egotistical sadist doesn't it?

      September 10, 2013 at 10:26 am |
  14. Mary

    To Dana Perino – If You can't respect the American process You do Not have to live here either .
    You do NOT own the country and trying to play nazi with your views is anti American .
    If you don't like people expressing their civil rights , YOU can Leave Now and make America a better place .
    After all the people With a function brain are tired of Dana Perino .

    September 10, 2013 at 10:07 am |
    • PennyK

      Too true! 🙂

      September 10, 2013 at 10:12 am |
  15. Thinker...

    I just don't understand what there is to debate on this topic. There is a federal law that sets forth the wording of the pledge of alligence. This wording establishes the primacy of a monotheistic religion. It is therefore in opposition to the establisment clause in the consti tution. What is there to debate? This is an honest question. In what way does having a federal law that promotes three religions over all others maintain consti tutionality?

    September 10, 2013 at 10:07 am |
    • Mary

      The current wording is NOT what our forefathers put together ,
      NOR what was used for centuries .
      Todays wording came about during our life time by pea brained right wingers fearing other countries .

      September 10, 2013 at 10:10 am |
      • Thinker...

        Try to separate yourself from the emotions surrounding this a bit. This country has barely been around long enough for 'centuries' to even be applicable and the pledge was not created by our founding fathers at all. There was no pledge up untill the late 1800s iirc. and it was an attempt to promote national loyalty above state loyalty. If you can step back from the emotions surrounding an argument it helps to get at the root of the problem and can (not always of course) avoid alienating those who oppose your view.

        September 10, 2013 at 10:30 am |
    • PennyK

      If you followed a recent article here, not everyone really believes that the three religions actually worship the same god. Christians certainly don't recognize the strict monotheism of Jews and Muslims, so how people from either of those religions can imagine that the pledge is talking about their god as well is beyond me.

      September 10, 2013 at 10:16 am |
      • Thinker...

        But the law only specifies 'god' not Christianity or Islam or Judaism (or Sikhism or some of the other smaller monotheistic faiths I forgot about when typing my original post). Therefore it can be taken only as an endorsement of monotheism not as an endorsement of a particular version of monotheism.

        September 10, 2013 at 10:25 am |
  16. Amanda

    I believe in God but I also believe in separation of church and state. Isn't religious freedom the reaseon we have this great country? ALL people should have the right to practice what religion they want. ALL people should also have the right to practice NO RELIGION if they want. Home of the free...FREE being the main word. If we want our children to have religion in their lives, shouldn't that begin at home?

    September 10, 2013 at 10:06 am |
    • ME II

      Well said!

      September 10, 2013 at 10:08 am |
    • Mary

      You agree with our forefathers who did NOT have this theistic wording in the pledge .
      This wording came about from changes made by right wingers afraid of Russia .
      We need to return to our Original pledge and let religion begin in the home .

      September 10, 2013 at 10:12 am |
    • Truth Quester

      Exactly! It is that simple. This is a blantant infringement upon those very rights that these children are pledging their allegiance to. How Ironic...

      September 10, 2013 at 10:39 am |
  17. Johnnyboy

    No one forces you to utter those two words during the pledge so just don't say them instead of stirring up trouble.

    September 10, 2013 at 10:06 am |
    • tom

      The group that started the trouble was the Christians in 1954. They apparently felt like adding these two words was a big deal. For them to now claim that it shouldn't be that big of a deal seems insincere. Especially when you see how hard they are fighting to keep these words in the pledge.

      September 10, 2013 at 10:10 am |
    • Observer

      Johnnyboy,

      So let's add "or no God at all" and you don't have to utter those 5 words.

      Deal?

      September 10, 2013 at 10:10 am |
    • cedar rapids

      You shouldnt have to make a choice saying the pledge to your flag.

      September 10, 2013 at 10:10 am |
    • A Dose of Reality

      The 'Trouble' started when the words were inserted. Never were meant to be there in the first place. But I do agree with you about one thing......no one should be made to say a pledge....any pledge.

      September 10, 2013 at 10:11 am |
    • Hey! You!

      'No one forces you to utter those two words',...................... not yet anyway.

      September 10, 2013 at 10:12 am |
    • Killbot

      Nobody said you couldn't be black – just be quiet about it and don't disturb all the normal people.
      Nobody said you couldn't be Asian...
      Nobody said you couldn't be _______ fill in the blank.

      September 10, 2013 at 10:14 am |
  18. Steve1959

    It's a shame that CNNs own programs are so boring that they have to turn to Fox News to get any kind of reaction from their audience.

    September 10, 2013 at 10:05 am |
    • Hey! You!

      And yet, here you are.

      September 10, 2013 at 10:09 am |
  19. Zoticus

    "In a sense, it's basically saying: Thanks for giving us the freedom to be an atheist." Saying thanks to whom? Uncle Sam? That's the most ridiculous interpretation of a loyalty oath I've ever heard.

    September 10, 2013 at 10:03 am |
    • tom

      Well it certainly wasn't God who gave us the freedom to be atheists. If that was the case wouldn't people in Middle East Muslim countries have this same freedom?

      September 10, 2013 at 10:07 am |
    • Tony

      I noticed the exact same thing. It's as if he's saying "atheists can keep saying god, but what they mean can be something else entirely different."
      It's either that or he's entirely missed the point on what atheism is.

      September 10, 2013 at 10:13 am |
  20. AtheistFools

    A new born baby atheists cries 18 hours a day. Then becomes the day they start talking, and their first word is "Bigot" and the second one is "Fallacy? Finally they end up repeating these like a broken record.

    September 10, 2013 at 10:02 am |
    • Observer

      They sound very perceptive if they are around many Christian HYPOCRITES.

      September 10, 2013 at 10:04 am |
    • doobzz

      Here we have witnessed God's love in action.

      September 10, 2013 at 10:04 am |
    • ME II

      "...anyone who says, 'You fool!' will be in danger of the fire of hell." (Mt 5:22)

      September 10, 2013 at 10:05 am |
    • ReligionIsBS

      Yes, but do they beleive in talking snakes and an idiot god who doesnt know how to forgive people unless he brutally murders his son, who is himself?

      September 10, 2013 at 10:07 am |
    • Hey! You!

      You do know, of course, that you are an internet troll?

      September 10, 2013 at 10:08 am |
      • AtheistFools

        I'd rather be an internet troll than a cry baby atheist.

        September 10, 2013 at 10:11 am |
        • tallulah13

          Of course you would, dear. If you stopped being a troll, you'd have to get a job and move out of your Mom's basement.

          September 10, 2013 at 10:58 am |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.