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September 9th, 2013
03:29 PM ET

Fox News host: Atheists 'don't have to live here'

By Daniel BurkeCNN Belief Blog Co-Editor
[twitter-follow screen_name='BurkeCNN']

(CNN) - Fox News pundit Dana Perino said she's "tired" of atheists attempting to remove the phrase "under God" from the Pledge of Allegiance, adding, "if these people really don't like it, they don't have to live here."

The co-host of Fox's "The Five" was referring to a suit brought by the American Humanist Association in Massachusetts, where the state's Supreme Judicial Court heard a challenge to the pledge on Wednesday.

The group's executive director, Roy Speckhardt, called the suit "the first challenge of its kind," but Perino begged to differ.

Perino, who was White House press secretary for George W. Bush from 2007-2009, said she recalled working at the Justice Department in 2001 "and a lawsuit like this came through."

The former Bush spokeswoman added that "before the day had finished the United States Senate and the House of Representatives had both passed resolutions saying that they were for keeping ‘under God’ in the pledge."

"If these people don't like it, they don't have to live here," Perino added.

David Silverman, president of the American Atheists, called Perino's comments "bigotry."

"I, for one, am tired of those Christians, like Ms. Perino, who think that equality is somehow un-American," Silverman said. "If Ms. Perino doesn't like being only equal, it is she who will have to leave America to some other country that doesn't value religious liberty."

READ MORE: Famous Atheists and Their Beliefs 

In 2002, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals sided with atheist Michael Newdow who argued that the words "under God" in the pledge amounted to an unconstitutional government endorsement of religion. The Supreme Court overturned that ruling.

Congress added the words "under God" in 1954 amid the red scare over the Soviet Union. In November 2002, after the Newdow ruling, Congress passed a law reaffirming "under God" in the pledge.

Greg Gutfeld, another co-host on "The Five," continued the discussion after Perino, saying the Pledge of Allegiance "is not a prayer, it's a patriotic exercise. In a sense, it's basically saying: Thanks for giving us the freedom to be an atheist."

The Massachusetts case, which was brought by an unidentified family of a student at a school in suburban Boston, will be argued on the premise that the pledge violates the Equal Rights Amendment of the Massachusetts Constitution.

READ MORE: Behold, the Six Types of Atheists

It is the first such case to be tried on the state level: All previous attempts have been argued in federal court on the grounds that "under God" was an unconstitutional violation of the separation of church and state.

CNN's Kevin Conlon contributed to this report.

- CNN Religion Editor

Filed under: Atheism • Belief • Church and state • Courts • Culture wars • News media • Schools • TV

soundoff (7,255 Responses)
  1. Steve Giles

    If the founding fathers thought this a Christian nation then why is the first amendment in direct violation of the first commandment?

    September 10, 2013 at 12:51 pm |
    • tom

      Good point. And the fact that it is the first amendment leads a person to believe that it may have been given the highest consideration.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:54 pm |
  2. GGCS

    Great, so they countered "America, love it or leave it" with the brilliant response of.... "America, love it or leave it."

    It really is just a matter of team red vs. team blue. Fundamentalists on both sides.

    September 10, 2013 at 12:51 pm |
  3. Uh-Clem

    The phrase "One Nation, under God" was never in the original pledge ironically penned by Baptist minister Francis Bellamy. It was first aggressively promoted for inclusion by the Knights Of Columbus and failed to gain sufficient votes by the House and Senate until then President Eisenhower, recently baptized as a Presbyterian, pushed it through and signed it into law. It is now way past time to revert to the original pledge and put aside the wishes of the American version of the Taliban and embrace inclusion instead of isolation.

    September 10, 2013 at 12:50 pm |
    • Arthur

      What exactly is isolation here and who are the Taliban, the Atheists, right? That'd make sense with how angry they are.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:03 pm |
      • Valere

        Boy are YOU confused....

        September 10, 2013 at 1:10 pm |
      • Mr. Flibble

        So Atheists are now Angry Muslim Terrorists? That has got to be the absolute stupidest thing I have ever read in my entire life.

        I'd tell you to go get a brain but I think you'd get distracted by something shiny on the way.

        September 10, 2013 at 1:10 pm |
  4. Jerry

    The United States Was Founded under the guise of Freedom of Religion and the majority of Americans approved of the Pledged, so if the atheists don't like it, "to Dam Bad", move to another Country that believes like they do. I am sure if you want to make a fight out of it there will be plenty of Red Blooded Americans willing to Kick you Stinking ass's out!

    September 10, 2013 at 12:49 pm |
    • Brad

      I wish you knew how wrong that statement is. It wasn't until the 50s that the Under God phrase was put in. The author Francis Bellamy while a minister was also a self proclaimed socialist.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:51 pm |
    • Time For You To Grow Up...

      LOL... The Pledge didn't exist until about 100 years after the US was founded, and 'Under God' wasn't included until the 1950s... You FAIL miserably.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:52 pm |
    • Jackson

      You're an idiot, Jerry. And I'd kick your teeth in if you tried to lay one dirty, sniveling finger on me.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:57 pm |
    • cleareye1

      I'm sure Jesus would agree?

      September 10, 2013 at 12:58 pm |
    • yeahright

      Ah, another good Christain. Who'se stinkin ass would Jesus kick? Hypocrite.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:00 pm |
  5. jonny broon

    "our country was built on christian principles" ... sorry, correction... our country and most of her monuments and buildings were built on ancient GREEK and ROMAN principles.. which is why we have things like a SENATE and ELECTIONS. long live zeus! read a book

    September 10, 2013 at 12:49 pm |
  6. zjmullen2013

    I'm areligious, and I find this whole argument a bit moot. I think we need to step back and ask, what is the pledge of allegiance in the first place? The last time I said it, I was in public primary school, starting when I was 5 years old. What are we doing urging children to recite a pledge that they don't fully comprehend in the first place? What's the point of it? Swearing allegiance to a government you don't even understand? To me, that's far scarier than claiming it to be "under God". Do you think if we asked a bunch of adults to say the "pledge of allegiance" to their government, that they would just blindly accept it? Most adults I talk to aren't terribly happy with the decisions of their government, despite their possible belief that it's under the supreme command of their God.

    September 10, 2013 at 12:48 pm |
    • zjmullen2013

      In any case, I will be advising my children that they should not recite any oath or incantation that they do not comprehend.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:53 pm |
    • cleareye1

      A rational response. Surprising.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:55 pm |
    • Jacob

      Agreed. The way it's recited is like hearing robots–unnatural pauses the way they learned it in kindergarden. It just sounds strange, and you know they don't even know what they are saying.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:56 pm |
  7. Time For You To Grow Up...

    "You can't convince a believer of anything, because their belief isn't rooted in evidence, but in a deep-seated need to believe."

    Carl Sagan

    September 10, 2013 at 12:48 pm |
    • 616

      Well, that's one opinion from a defunct, imperfect and limited human destined for the grave. Hmm, just like the billions of other humans..his opinion hardly matters more than anyone else.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:53 pm |
      • sam

        You seem fun.

        September 10, 2013 at 1:15 pm |
  8. Skippy

    no one has ever accused perino of being scholarly

    September 10, 2013 at 12:48 pm |
  9. Jeff

    As stated in the Treaty of Tripoli of 1797, signed by the President and ratified by Congress:

    "As the Government of the United States of America is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion ...."

    There it is – in writing and signed by our founding fathers.

    End of discussion.

    September 10, 2013 at 12:47 pm |
    • RobertBalto

      Yes, thank you! Accurate, relevant and timely even after all the years since the Treaty.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:09 pm |
  10. cleareye1

    One day the religious zealots may find the confidence in their beliefs that will allow them to simply mind their own business and stop trying to convince others that we all must humble ourselves before the magical creature in the cosmos.

    Maybe we should just outlaw gods, all of them?

    September 10, 2013 at 12:46 pm |
    • Skippy

      nice

      September 10, 2013 at 12:49 pm |
    • Valere

      Amen and can I get a hallelujah?

      September 10, 2013 at 12:53 pm |
    • stevemanthei

      No more than you and your very small population that mock what you don't fully understand and try to shove your beliefs down our thoats.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:54 pm |
  11. Suzanne Russell

    UNDER GOD stays! We put it in because our country was founded on Christian principles and still is based that way. Those who don't want it, don't have to acknowledge it, but can cross theirs out. I gladly acknowledge it!

    September 10, 2013 at 12:45 pm |
    • sam

      Oh man, how many of these folks who don't know the history of this country are going to come in here and look stupid today?

      I love it when someone yells about how patriotic they are and then can't even get the most basic history right.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:47 pm |
      • Mike

        Sam, let's start counting with you.

        September 10, 2013 at 12:54 pm |
        • sam

          So are you okay with Suzanne's utter lack of knowledge? Or just feeling butthurt on behalf of a fellow christian?

          September 10, 2013 at 1:18 pm |
      • Mike S

        I love how people think being Christian is somehow patriotic.

        September 10, 2013 at 12:54 pm |
        • sam

          I have yet to meet a chrisitan that believes otherwise.

          September 10, 2013 at 1:19 pm |
    • Doris

      I think our founders realized (as you should), that Christianity does not have ownership of principles that non-Christians may also possess. Would you like me to bring some quotes out?

      September 10, 2013 at 12:48 pm |
    • cleareye1

      Only a very liberal interpretation of the founding would support your specious claim. Most founders had a well considered fear of people just like you!

      September 10, 2013 at 12:49 pm |
      • Mike

        Yeah, like the 98% of them that were Christian...???

        September 10, 2013 at 12:55 pm |
        • sam

          Mike, the founding fathers were deist. Stop embarassing yourself.

          September 10, 2013 at 1:20 pm |
    • Skippy

      nutz!

      September 10, 2013 at 12:50 pm |
    • Gingeet

      "Under god" was put in long after our country was founded. It has nothing to do with your delusion and poor knowledge of history. This is not a xtian nation. Get a life.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:50 pm |
    • tom

      What exactly are Christian principals? There are universal principals that Christians like to claim propriety of. That is just something that Christians do but it doesn't make them right.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:51 pm |
      • cleareye1

        That reminds me of the Stephen Colbert interview with the religious zealot congressman from Florida who couldn't think of more than 2 of the 10 Commandments when challenged.
        Modern American Christianity is a fraud. There are maybe 5% of us are real followers of the teachings of Jesus.

        September 10, 2013 at 1:05 pm |
    • Jackson

      Suzanne, you're quite ignorant, aren't you? Fortunately, in this country under the 1st Amendment, you can show everyone just how ignorant by posting what you just did.
      Genocide is what founded this country. Good old Christian genocide. Get a clue, hmmmmmm?

      September 10, 2013 at 12:51 pm |
      • Attack of the 50 Foot Magical Underwear

        And don't forget good old-fashion Christian slavery. The southern economy was built on slave labour, and the Christian bible, as we all know, condones slavery.

        September 10, 2013 at 12:59 pm |
    • John

      This nation was NOT founded on Christian principals, it was founded on the belief that America should be governed free from any religion. And the "under God" was only added in 1954,so it isn't even part of the original pledge.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:52 pm |
      • Mike

        It wasn't formally adopted in the first place unti 1942....so I have no idea what you are talking about either.

        September 10, 2013 at 1:03 pm |
    • The Lord of Excess

      We put "UNDER GOD" "in there" in 1948. Most of the reason for having the "pledge" is an anti-commie propaganda measure from the height of the red scare. The pledge is an antequated practice that means little to anyone, children don't understand it, and none of us belive it anymore. Who are we saying the pledge too? The government that all of you "under god" lovers love to hate? To each other? We all hate each other, conservatives won't listen to liberals and liberals won't listen to conservatives. So who is it for?

      The "under god" controversy is a way for one religion to try to insert itself into the public eye. It is akin to Kim Khardashian, Lindsay, Paris, etc. free publicity and a way to scare people in the pulpits. During the middle ages Christianity began to use fear as a primary tactic to keep the "flock" in line. In most churches and certainly with national christian organizations that tactic is alive and well. But I thank all of those Christian's out there who believe in using fear to drive people to religion because for everyone they bring in that way, four more people decide it is all a bunch of hooey, just another way to pull money out of your pocket and tell you what to think and how to act.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:59 pm |
    • truthprevails1

      "UNDER GOD stays! "

      You are in control of this how exactly??? You know an education is a wonderful thing, you might wish to look in to getting one!

      September 10, 2013 at 1:01 pm |
    • Valere

      Our FOUNDING fathers kept mistresses and slaves. I guess those are the "Christian principles" you speak of...lol

      September 10, 2013 at 1:03 pm |
    • HA25

      You make the perfect case for removing that clause..

      September 10, 2013 at 1:09 pm |
  12. Oppy

    The pledge works just as well without "under God" as it does with it. If you want your kid to be taught about a nation under God, there are a number of Sunday school programs that will be happy to help you out with that. That said, I'm not sure if it's fair for an Atheist to force a kid to grow up Atheist, anymore than a Christian should force a kid to grow up Christian. Kids should be exposed to multiple ideas, and allowed to make up their own minds. While it shouldn't be the government's role to emphasize one belief over another, it's unreasonable to expect a child to grow up not being exposed to religious beliefs different from your own, and I believe it should be encouraged.

    September 10, 2013 at 12:45 pm |
    • Dave

      This is probably the most intelligent comment of the day.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:53 pm |
    • Bryan H

      The "under God" part wasn't added to the pledge until 1954 (to brace and reassure ourselves against the godless Commies). Of course, the pledge itself didn't originate until the very late 19th century (and by a Socialist Minister, no less), and the original salute was akin to the Nazis. Look, like every kid from public education, I was brought up reciting the pledge every morning, 180 days a year (give or take). But by the time I reached middle school, I started questioning my faith and chose to stop saying "those two words." By the time I reached high school, I started questioning the very notion of pledging "allegiance" to a symbol of government that I didn't agree with, and stopped saying the pledge all-together. The sky didn't fall. No lawyers got involved. I was not scolded or praised for my decisions. I simply acted in accordance with my beliefs, and asked nothing of anyone else. It would be nice if we could all treat others and be treated in such a way.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:58 pm |
    • Jacob

      Fine to encourage religious exposure, but not from the government, which is the whole point of this argument.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:01 pm |
    • HA25

      Well, look. Just as not all theories of gravity are correct – not all theories of, let's call it Spirituality, are right.
      Expose them to the theories that have evidence to support them.
      Which, in this case, leaves pretty slim pickings...

      September 10, 2013 at 1:12 pm |
  13. JJ

    I'm confused, in all my years of reading the bible I never found that passage about God blessing America. Could someone point it out. I'm a Christian too, but as far as I can tell the survival of the United States of America has nothing to to with God's kingdom. Sorry FOX news.

    September 10, 2013 at 12:45 pm |
    • lol?? Pithiest, YES!!

      He did tell ya how it was gonna turn out, though, Diverse Beast and all.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:58 pm |
  14. sly

    Science and logic always prevails:

    Our wise justices legalized abortion.
    We now have gay marriage.
    We've removed most religious references from federal buildings.

    Of course the pledge will be amended to take out the fantasy part.

    We always win. Humans progress – that's why 97% of scientists at the NAS laugh at the godsters belief in magic.

    Realize: your average American is not college educated – less than 40%. Of college educated people, 80% believe in science, and not the little red man with horns living in the center of the earth.

    September 10, 2013 at 12:44 pm |
  15. joe

    The scary part is that someone that ignorant is in your government! How do you like that?

    September 10, 2013 at 12:44 pm |
  16. john

    I think the pledge of allegiance should just be removed (at least from grade schools and junior high / middle schools) I (and I'm sure many others) consider the pledge of allegiance a form of brainwashing. Think about this, children who are in grade school up to high school have NO idea what they are making a "pledge" too. It's an oath !!..So, why do it ? Why force a child to do this. They are incapable of understanding what they are making a pledge too. And this is to be taken seriously, right ? If not then why do it ? (The Pledge)

    Now, someone in high school (junior and later years ) will obviously understand what a " Pledge / oath " is !

    As for the " under god " part...what god ?..the " Christian " god ??..is that what they are pledging too ? Hey, got news for you..christianity is one of the MAIN reasons why there are constant wars. And let us not forget that it was these " loving " christian people who invaded this continent and damn near wiped out the native American Indians. Let us not forget that it was also these loving "christians" who enslaved alot of the african american people and tried to break away from the union so they could keep slavery going.

    September 10, 2013 at 12:44 pm |
  17. Time For You To Grow Up...

    The single greatest threat to America are the Talibangelicals...

    September 10, 2013 at 12:44 pm |
    • Skippy

      Amen

      September 10, 2013 at 12:47 pm |
    • lol?? Pithiest, YES!!

      Single?? Ahh, a singleminded socie.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:57 pm |
  18. In point of fact...

    Atheists don't have to live here, so please take the Kardashians and Justin Bieber with you.

    September 10, 2013 at 12:44 pm |
    • Time For You To Grow Up...

      Justin Bieber is a Christian... And is actually a lot smarter than most other Christians... How sad is THAT??

      September 10, 2013 at 12:45 pm |
      • Spencer

        He's also a Canadian.

        September 10, 2013 at 12:52 pm |
      • Arthur

        Are you being a troll? Justin, a Christian? Come on now. His fruits don't prove it and how do you know he's smart?

        September 10, 2013 at 12:57 pm |
        • In point of fact...

          Compared to the troll you replied to, Bieber is a freakin rocket scientist. Then again, so is my cat.

          September 10, 2013 at 1:20 pm |
  19. Philip

    Whenever this issue comes up the Christians seem to panic. I think it's because they know it's unconsti.tutional.

    September 10, 2013 at 12:42 pm |
    • Jacob

      Right. If they're so sure it will pass consti-tutionality, just let it take its course through the courts and quit worrying about it.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:45 pm |
    • sam

      They panic because they think unless they mouth some words about how great and faithful they think they are, god might get them.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:49 pm |
    • Actually

      Actually, it's more like people of faith are tired of this vocal minority who feel their beliefs (i.e. that no god exists) should be dominant in the culture.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:49 pm |
      • Barbara

        By saying so you assert that your god should be dominant. How about everybody just believes what works for them and keeps their experience of god or no god private?

        September 10, 2013 at 1:16 pm |
      • HA25

        I didn't hear Athiests trying to put "One Nation, Who all believe in No God, Indivisible,,"
        So I fail to see how any belief becomes dominant as part of this argument..

        September 10, 2013 at 1:16 pm |
      • sam

        Someone's got to stand up to you jerks to keep you in line occasionally.

        September 10, 2013 at 1:22 pm |
  20. fred

    Remove the "one Nation" and leave the under God. Even atheists are under God regardless of their personal beliefs. If by chance (a chance in hell) there turns out to be no God their belief still does not change their final non existence. Atheism is a lose lose belief based upon faith in an accidental existence that is unreasonable based on the mathematical impossibility of intelligent life forming out of chaos. Life is only possible when based upon faith some unknown causation defies known science.

    Atheists lose if they are correct because without an eternal record they never existed based upon their demands of falsifiable proof and they lose if God exists. Exactly how reasonable or intelligent is it for an adult to hold a faith in that which is scientifically proven to be a false belief in godlessness.

    September 10, 2013 at 12:42 pm |
    • Jacob

      You don't think for yourself much, do you?

      September 10, 2013 at 12:44 pm |
    • magicpanties

      Fantastic word salad, Fred!
      My invisible pink unicorn was in need of a snack.
      Thanks!

      September 10, 2013 at 12:45 pm |
    • joe

      Remove the "one Nation" and leave the under God. Even atheists are under God regardless of their personal beliefs.
      -------
      What? Really? Tell me it ain't so Fred.

      When did Allah get here?

      September 10, 2013 at 12:46 pm |
    • EnjaySea

      Fred, your rant actually made no sense whatsoever.

      Atheists haven't been convinced that there is a god. It's not any more complicated than that.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:46 pm |
    • Time For You To Grow Up...

      No one else can hear the voices in your head...

      September 10, 2013 at 12:47 pm |
    • Richard MacHugely

      The logic in Fred's post reminds me of that old TIME CUBE website. . .

      September 10, 2013 at 12:48 pm |
      • stevemanthei

        Yet you have no response other than snarky remarks? If you have a bit of intelligence and reason in your body you would understand what he is saying even if you don't agree with it. Which when using reason it is pretty hard not to.

        September 10, 2013 at 12:51 pm |
        • Johnny

          He didn't say anything worth responding to.

          September 10, 2013 at 1:52 pm |
    • stevemanthei

      Very well said! I'm waiting for the Easter bunnies and Unicorns comments as well as the same old song and dance of Science that does not prove why but only how. Reason is something that atheists fail to acknowledge.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:49 pm |
      • John

        Atheists don't understand reason? Hmm, yet I understand that there is no way someone could build an ark to hold two of every animal on earth. Seems I have a bit more sense than you give me credit for.

        September 10, 2013 at 1:07 pm |
        • stevemanthei

          Alright John, A reasonable person in human society would know that everything that humans have created came from thought. You have to put thought behind anything created. Even if created accidentally, there was thought to pursue action which caused the creation. If you don't believe this than please give me an example. Now why is it unreasonable to believe, like everything we know for sure in the sense of creation, that there was thought to our creation? To believe that we are random is statistically insane. But knowing how creation works in this world why do you deny that we weren't thought of? Is that unreasonable? Or is the unreasonable one you?

          September 10, 2013 at 1:51 pm |
        • EnjaySea

          "To believe that we are random is statistically insane."

          It's not statistically insane. How do I know? Because we're here.

          It's highly likely that life is ubiquitous throughout the universe - that the laws of the universe lead to life, and we're here because life happens, not because of some fantastically, insanely improbable roll of the dice.

          September 10, 2013 at 3:44 pm |
        • fred

          Enjay
          You are a dreamer as there is no evidence of life outside this planet.

          September 10, 2013 at 4:29 pm |
    • Rational inquiry and verification of the believer mindset

      Let's take a peek at how fred's mind works:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4YIj4rLYo0c

      September 10, 2013 at 12:51 pm |
      • lol?? Pithiest, YES!!

        Poor little animal, caught in inflationary doom. Run FASTER!

        September 10, 2013 at 12:55 pm |
    • Spencer

      you've never studied probabilities have you.

      September 10, 2013 at 12:53 pm |
      • fred

        There is a 100% probability that I have studied binomial distribution. The odds of your assumption being correct were less than 100% at inception and given past distributions become constants after the event your assumption can never be correct. In the same way the probability of our existence by random accidental event remains a statistical impossibility even though you claim your existence is proof to the contrary. This is one the reasons Hawking's required a hypothetical multiverse (infinite in number by the way is what is required to overcome statistical impossibility) to justify his "no god needed" belief system.

        September 10, 2013 at 1:23 pm |
        • G to the T

          Fine Fred – show your math. I'm willing to bet one or more of your variables are incorrect.

          September 13, 2013 at 12:39 pm |
    • brian

      So believe because it is a safe bet?

      Faith is not a bet, if the sole reason you believe is because you are betting, well that is not a ticket into heaven. However if you treat your neighbor well, and love your enemies, and do the other things espoused in the bible like the Parable of the Good Samaritan, then you go to heaven. The Samaritan was not a priest, he was in a fringe cult the jews considered wrong, and it says nothing about loving god in that parable, in fact the ones who failed were the ones that seemed like they were more religious.

      That story could of been the Good Atheist. Be a good person, treat the least well, as you would treat yourself, (which assumes you treat yourself well). Treat everyone as if they are your brother, your son, as if they are Jesus. Leave the world a better place than when you came into it – love the world and those in it. That is the only safe bet, and I think most atheists are just as good at doing that as christians, perhaps better.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:01 pm |
      • fred

        I only mentioned probabilities because the atheist bases godlessness on hard scientific data that meets the standards of scientific method. My point being their foundation is flawed and contradicts their world view which typically is philosophical naturalism. Their faith is a "bet" because it is supposedly based on fact.

        A ticket to Heaven is based upon one way and one way only if you are referring to the truths set out by Jesus. If there is truth is what Jesus had to say those who are given the understanding that salvation is in Christ must follow that way. There is the exception where Jesus can give a "ticket" to others who did not have opportunity to reject "the way truth and the light" and that may or may not be limited to the Good Samaritan.

        September 10, 2013 at 1:40 pm |
        • Johnny

          I tend to base my non belief in god on things that believers say. So far no believer has ever said anything to give me a reason to even consider that god might be real. Also the stories in the bible about Jesus are clearly nonsense.

          September 10, 2013 at 1:55 pm |
        • fred

          Johnny
          "the stories in the bible about Jesus are clearly nonsense"
          =>Jesus himself said that he speaks in parables so that only those with eyes can see and those with ears can hear
          =>The Bible itself states it is foolishness to the perishing
          =>Science and reason tend to approach things from the perspective of a skeptic. Jesus stood before the Sanhedrin and they could not see Christ because of their arrogance and pride in their religious positions. There are many reasons we refuse to see or cannot see the message of truth in the Bible stories.
          I assume the virgin birth, miracles and resurrection are the main reasons you see Jesus stories as nonsense. Keep in mind that all these events fulfilled prophecy of the Jews as to the Christ they were waiting for all these years. Christ who they expected would deliver them from the Romans to be their long awaited King. These same Jews put Jesus on trial and they sacrificed the perfect lamb just as they practiced in their ceremony for thousands of years as Jesus cried out "Father forgive them for they know not what they do".
          How do you explain such a foolish story could sweep over the world in less that 200 years to become a world view that governs our destiny to this very day? How do you explain the Bible being #1 best seller every year with over 6 billion sold and 50 flying off the shelves every minute of every day

          September 10, 2013 at 2:27 pm |
      • Dippy's Aide

        brian,

        "That story could of been...", should be "could have been" or "could've been" ("could of" makes no sense).

        September 10, 2013 at 1:59 pm |
    • Mr. Flibble

      Common Sense and Physics prove there is no "Christian God" but then again, I've never known a Christian with Common Sense.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:02 pm |
      • fred

        Physics does no such thing and given its limitations to known matter and energy cannot prove or disprove anything outside the natural.
        Common Sense can and has been proven wrong time and time again. That is one of the arguments atheists like to make when it is pointed out that 92% of the worlds population have a sense that our existence is based upon something much greater than science can explain. That is a very common sense which atheists argue "just because the majority think it is true does not make it true"

        September 10, 2013 at 1:48 pm |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.