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September 9th, 2013
03:29 PM ET

Fox News host: Atheists 'don't have to live here'

By Daniel BurkeCNN Belief Blog Co-Editor
[twitter-follow screen_name='BurkeCNN']

(CNN) - Fox News pundit Dana Perino said she's "tired" of atheists attempting to remove the phrase "under God" from the Pledge of Allegiance, adding, "if these people really don't like it, they don't have to live here."

The co-host of Fox's "The Five" was referring to a suit brought by the American Humanist Association in Massachusetts, where the state's Supreme Judicial Court heard a challenge to the pledge on Wednesday.

The group's executive director, Roy Speckhardt, called the suit "the first challenge of its kind," but Perino begged to differ.

Perino, who was White House press secretary for George W. Bush from 2007-2009, said she recalled working at the Justice Department in 2001 "and a lawsuit like this came through."

The former Bush spokeswoman added that "before the day had finished the United States Senate and the House of Representatives had both passed resolutions saying that they were for keeping ‘under God’ in the pledge."

"If these people don't like it, they don't have to live here," Perino added.

David Silverman, president of the American Atheists, called Perino's comments "bigotry."

"I, for one, am tired of those Christians, like Ms. Perino, who think that equality is somehow un-American," Silverman said. "If Ms. Perino doesn't like being only equal, it is she who will have to leave America to some other country that doesn't value religious liberty."

READ MORE: Famous Atheists and Their Beliefs 

In 2002, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals sided with atheist Michael Newdow who argued that the words "under God" in the pledge amounted to an unconstitutional government endorsement of religion. The Supreme Court overturned that ruling.

Congress added the words "under God" in 1954 amid the red scare over the Soviet Union. In November 2002, after the Newdow ruling, Congress passed a law reaffirming "under God" in the pledge.

Greg Gutfeld, another co-host on "The Five," continued the discussion after Perino, saying the Pledge of Allegiance "is not a prayer, it's a patriotic exercise. In a sense, it's basically saying: Thanks for giving us the freedom to be an atheist."

The Massachusetts case, which was brought by an unidentified family of a student at a school in suburban Boston, will be argued on the premise that the pledge violates the Equal Rights Amendment of the Massachusetts Constitution.

READ MORE: Behold, the Six Types of Atheists

It is the first such case to be tried on the state level: All previous attempts have been argued in federal court on the grounds that "under God" was an unconstitutional violation of the separation of church and state.

CNN's Kevin Conlon contributed to this report.

- CNN Religion Editor

Filed under: Atheism • Belief • Church and state • Courts • Culture wars • News media • Schools • TV

soundoff (7,255 Responses)
  1. Edgar diaz

    I agree, move out this is the way it was written and founding fathers intented this to be a Christian nation with your right to practice your religion. thats why the first congress pray and still do today! mive to china who is an atheist nation and see if you like it?

    September 10, 2013 at 1:36 pm |
    • In Santa we trust

      It's not the way it was originally written; it was changed in the 50's amid the paranoia about communism.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:39 pm |
    • doobzz

      "move out this is the way it was written and founding fathers intented this to be a Christian nation "

      No, it wasn't and no, they didn't.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:41 pm |
    • Bo

      Fail. Badly.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:41 pm |
    • Lucifer's Evil Twin

      I apologize for America's failure to provide you a basic education... you make me sad 🙁

      September 10, 2013 at 1:41 pm |
    • Just the Facts Ma'am...

      Mr. Diaz might just need a refresh of his civics class...

      September 10, 2013 at 1:42 pm |
  2. mederata

    I can see no offence is the pledge, in Under God. But I do see Atheist point of view, that is forced down their throat (as they said). If this was about religion it could be bad (religious feud isnt want one needs anymore) but it is above religion for one God or the creator. If Atheists do not want to speak the pledge Im sure its not mandatory; but how about they should tell 90% of people not to respect God for their 10% belief.

    September 10, 2013 at 1:35 pm |
    • closet atheist

      90% of Americans are christians..??

      Challenge

      September 10, 2013 at 1:40 pm |
    • ME II

      They are free to "respect God" in any way they see fit, within the law, but having a government endorsement of a religious concept chanted at school each day is not "respect".

      September 10, 2013 at 1:40 pm |
    •  

      Godless Vagabond
      You can respect god all you want by saying your silly prayers in church or whatever. Do you need to have it in our pledge to show that respect? Does your silly god really care how he is respected? Get it out of the pledge and take it off our money. It's SEPARATION OF CHURCH AND STATE. Your religion is your business, not the government's. Why the hell can't people understand that?

      September 10, 2013 at 1:41 pm |
    • Bo

      Fail. Report back to your local immigration office and bring Edgar from post above with you.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:44 pm |
  3. lol?? Pithiest, YES!!

    Thanks fer turnin' the gubmint into an all powerful god, socies.

    September 10, 2013 at 1:35 pm |
    • Jackson

      Moron. Don't know the meaning of socialism, don't know the meaning of pithy. Low-information guttersnipe hag.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:42 pm |
    • lol?? Pithiest, YES!!

      If you like, I'll call yer dog a socie too – for free!

      September 10, 2013 at 1:45 pm |
      • lol?? Pithiest, YES!!

        Covet my name, socie??

        September 10, 2013 at 2:04 pm |
  4. cribbooky

    Separation of church and state prevents societies such as those under the Spanish Inquisition and modern Sharia Law so I am for it. If only we could get separation of commerce and state now, which would also remove special interests from driving policy for every free person.

    September 10, 2013 at 1:32 pm |
    • Thinker...

      Except a completely hands-off system doesen't work long term. You can't have a separation of commerce and state because commerce MUST be regulated at least a bit. Without regulation all you end up with is monopolies. Eventually one company will own all of a commodity like Rockefeller or Carnegie or the other robber-barons of the turn of the century. Without at least some regulation Bell would be the only telecom company and would set the prices at whatever they wanted. In effect these companies that control all means of production and infrastructure would BE the government since the government could not act without their go-ahead. You want to create a way for people and materials to move around the country quickly without using the railroads (ie highways)? You would need Union Pacific's OK to do it or they could shut your state's economy down or make the construction too expensive by preventing movement of materials. This is completely ignoringtrade laws and standards that keep the average consumer form getting hosed by the big companies' fine print lawyers.

      September 10, 2013 at 2:07 pm |
  5. Church of Suicidal

    From now on, I'm going with "under Thor." If I'm going to be forced to pledge my allegiance to a god, it might as well be a kick-a$$ one.

    September 10, 2013 at 1:31 pm |
    • Jacob

      Funny!

      September 10, 2013 at 1:40 pm |
  6. BriSoFla

    "I, for one, am tired of those Christians, like Ms. Perino, who think that equality is somehow un-American," Silverman said. "If Ms. Perino doesn't like being only equal, it is she who will have to leave America to some other country that doesn't value religious liberty."

    I COULDN'T HAVE SAID IT BETTER MYSELF! Screw FOX and their repukes!

    September 10, 2013 at 1:30 pm |
  7. chad

    Atheists, = The new world order of bigotry.

    September 10, 2013 at 1:30 pm |
    • BU2B

      Yeah, because we are trying to get you to say "one nation, under atheism". Get real. The fact is that our pledge having the phrase "under god" in it is a direct violation of the 1st amendment.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:33 pm |
    • Bo

      Chad = dufus

      September 10, 2013 at 1:35 pm |
    • ME II

      Yeah, look out! ~10% of the population is taking over, beware. /sarcasm

      September 10, 2013 at 1:36 pm |
    • doobzz

      Oh, look, a hanging chad!

      September 10, 2013 at 1:44 pm |
    • yeahright

      Oh, the poor oppressed majority.

      September 10, 2013 at 2:26 pm |
  8. pkfops

    Freedom of religion means freedom from religious nutjobs.

    September 10, 2013 at 1:30 pm |
  9. Just the Facts Ma'am...

    The pledge has existed WITHOUT the words "Under God" for longer than it has with them. I know many morons must not be able to do the math or don't know or care that those words were not added until 1954, but that doesn't mean the rest of us have to placate to morons.

    September 10, 2013 at 1:29 pm |
  10. Trevor

    Let's just change it to "One nation under Buddha" or maybe "Allah" or any of the Hindu Gods or maybe Native American Gods. Maybe that would let Christians finally see how Atheists like seeing "Under God".

    September 10, 2013 at 1:29 pm |
    • Franklin

      After all, it doesn't really matter what it says, right? Just don't say it if it offends you.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:32 pm |
    • Kat

      Here's a famous reply from many unorthodox groups:

      If you don't like it, you don't have to look at it.

      Isn't that what other groups tell people? Oh, but if Christians say that to anyone, it's the worst thing in the world. It's just like going to Wal Mart and walking through the book section and seeing a Bible. Does that mean all Bibles should be banned from stores? I'm sure that'll follow if this passes.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:35 pm |
      • Denise Larang

        or just put the bibles in with the other mythological texts. I did that test yesterday to show my 11 year old what the bible is like. You pick it up and 3 times, randomly open to a different section and just start reading. Within a few words you are either saying a lie or some nonsense drivel. Works every time 🙂

        September 10, 2013 at 1:42 pm |
        • Kat

          You can put it wherever you would like. If you take the time to understand the Bible and read it (just like anything else) in context, it's not very difficult to understand. Many things that the Bible stated would happen, have. Anyone can choose to believe or not to believe, but it would be nice if people had a little respect for others when they say (or type) things.

          September 10, 2013 at 2:55 pm |
    •  

      Godless Vagabond
      Shit, that gives me an idea, Trevor. List all the possible gods in the pledge and just speak the one (or ones) that appeal to you. Or none if you're an atheist. Completely neutral, no one can complain.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:59 pm |
      • Kat

        I actually agree with this. I don't feel that "cramming your beliefs down someone's throat" is the best way to do anything. I believe in choice and that everyone has one. If you give everyone the choice to say (or not say) what they want in that section, everyone should be happy. Of course, no one will be. That's just how it works.

        September 10, 2013 at 2:36 pm |
    • jwc1017

      IIf they are truly atheist then why do they give a damn?

      September 10, 2013 at 4:45 pm |
  11. Todd Fields

    I am tired of Atheist trying to run God out of our country. You have a right to believe what you want to believe. However, this country was founded by Christians. They believed that the country would not prosper without God. Now, we are removing God from our country and it is going downhill fast. We are losing our moral compass and it shows.

    September 10, 2013 at 1:28 pm |
    • Franklin

      This country was not founded by Christians. Where are you getting that idea from?

      September 10, 2013 at 1:29 pm |
    • doobzz

      " However, this country was founded by Christians. They believed that the country would not prosper without God."

      You are a liar.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:29 pm |
    •  

      Godless Vagabond
      The country was not founded on christian principles. How many times do we have to go over this?

      September 10, 2013 at 1:29 pm |
    • Dense

      wow, you need to read your history books again son. This country WAS NOT founded on your iron-age babbley book nonsense about your chosen jew getting nailed to a post for asking everyone to just be nice to each other

      September 10, 2013 at 1:30 pm |
    • Bible Clown©

      Do you think "God" is going to be picked up with a front-end loader and driven over the border? Christ, you people sound dumb sometimes. Last I heard, "God" was a "Spirit" who lived "up in Heaven" and "Came Down" to impregnate a Virgin. He "Does Miracles" and "Collects Money From Christians." If He can be removed from this country, He is a fraud and needs to pay back the money He Collected.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:32 pm |
    • Ed

      Sooooooo in order to be good we need God?

      September 10, 2013 at 1:33 pm |
      • closet atheist

        Laughable, isn't it..??

        You truly can't break religious types from thinking there is a correlation between religiosity and morality.

        It could certainly be argued that atheists/humanists are morally superior because they treat other right simply because it is right, rather than fear of retribution from an angry god.

        September 10, 2013 at 1:51 pm |
    • Michael Cook

      Wrong this country was not founded on christian beliefs, and the term separation of church and state is proof of that.
      In fact the phrase under God was not in our original pledge. It was added back in the 50's.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:34 pm |
    • Just the Facts Ma'am...

      Our founders were a group of theists, deists, atheists and Christians who decided on rules so that everyone can play. Think of it like the rules for softball. Can Christians play softball? Of course they can. Can atheists, theists and deists play softball and are the rules exactly the same for the Christians? Yes.

      The only problem started when the Christians decided to change the rules to favor themselves and they got away with it through lies, fear, intimidation, persecution and peer pressure. And now they think they won so they believe they get to rewrite history. To bad for them that only works if you murder any dissenters which is a little hard to pull off after their Catholic friend Hitler tried it.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:37 pm |
    • James

      If you read a history book you'd know that their is plenty of evidence to suggest the Founding Fathers were major skeptics of religion all together. Maybe do some research into a topic instead of just making something up.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:37 pm |
      • Dippy

        There, not their.

        September 10, 2013 at 1:47 pm |
      • Todd Fields

        Read what they wrote:
        Benjamin Rush- "Christianity is the only true and perfect religion, and that in proportion as mankind adopts its principles and obeys its precepts, they will be wise and happy."
        Samuel Adams "... kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ may be everywhere established, and all people everywhere willingly bow to the sceptre of Him who is Prince of Peace."
        John Adams-"Suppose a nation in some distant Region should take the Bible for their only law Book, and every member should regulate his conduct by the precepts there exhibited! Every member would be obliged in conscience, to temperance, frugality, and industry; to justice, kindness, and charity towards his fellow men; and to piety, love, and reverence toward Almighty God ... What a Eutopia, what a Paradise would this region be."
        Maybe everyon should study the founding fathers and what they said.

        September 10, 2013 at 2:06 pm |
    • Jake

      This country was founded by Christians? Wow, do some reserach. Most of our founders were atheists or at a minimum, despised organized religion.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:41 pm |
    • Kat

      Out of the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence, 24 held seminary or Bible school degrees.

      Quote from John Adams:

      "Suppose a nation in some distant Region should take the Bible for their only law Book, and every member should regulate his conduct by the precepts there exhibited! Every member would be obliged in conscience, to temperance, frugality, and industry; to justice, kindness, and charity towards his fellow men; and to piety, love, and reverence toward Almighty God ... What a Eutopia, what a Paradise would this region be."

      And Thomas Jefferson:

      "I am a real Christian – that is to say, a disciple of the doctrines of Jesus Christ."

      And Benjamin Rush:

      "The gospel of Jesus Christ prescribes the wisest rules for just conduct in every situation of life. Happy they who are enabled to obey them in all situations!"

      Is that enough? I'm sure I can find more from men who signed the Declaration of Independence...

      September 10, 2013 at 1:48 pm |
      • Jake

        Thomas Jefferson:

        "The day will come when the mystical generation of Jesus, by the Supreme Being as His father, in the womb of a virgin will be classed with the fable of the generation of Minerva in the brain of Jupiter." Letter to John Adams, April 11, 1823

        It's not hard to find quotes of people reflecting the status quo of their time. You could quote me as having said, "One nation, under god", but that I was forced to say that to fit in. That doesn't mean I'm religious.

        September 10, 2013 at 2:01 pm |
        • Kat

          If you actually read what he wrote, it doesn't say anything about this being a good thing, being what he believes, etc. He was simply stating that someday no one will really believe in Jesus as they used to. I agree that, just because someone is quoted as saying something, doesn't mean they truly believe it; however, he was quoted many times as a believer in God. I'm sure if you had been quoted as being a true believer, instead of using some generic "under God" quote, people would feel that you believed in something.

          Jefferson believed in the god of deism; however, he still believed in much of what the Bible says.

          Here's a better quote from him:

          "But it does me no injury for my neighbor to say there are twenty gods or no God. It neither picks my pocket nor breaks my leg."

          I think what we really need is not acceptance of others' beliefs, but the sense to be respectful.

          September 10, 2013 at 2:45 pm |
  12. 52pan

    No one is trying to force anyone into a belief system by saying "under God" in the pledge of allegiance. No one is forced to say the pledge if they don't want to. The lawyer for the plaintiffs say that the children who are atheists, are being categorized as unpatriotic. I think that the children should be able to testify as to how they feel. Not the lawyers or the organizations or the parents, but the children. All these adults are making the determination as to how the pledge of allegiance is effecting the children. Let the children speak for themselves.

    September 10, 2013 at 1:28 pm |
    • Michael Cook

      I wish Christians would do this for their kids, instead of ramming God down their throats from birth. Let the kids decide if there is a god and let the parents stay out of it. How bout them apples?

      September 10, 2013 at 1:39 pm |
      • Kat

        Actually, a lot of "Christian parents" do allow their children to make that decision. It's just like anything else though. If your parents do it, you normally have to do it when you're younger. My parents took me bowling, golfing, etc. when I was younger. Does that mean they rammed it down my throat and made me be an athlete or be on any team? Nope.

        September 10, 2013 at 1:42 pm |
        • closet atheist

          Kat

          Bowling and golf aren't taught as absolute truths like religion.

          But nice try... 🙂

          September 10, 2013 at 1:53 pm |
  13. Heather Olson

    It wasn't in the pledge until the cold war when the U.S. wanted to differentiate itself from the "Godless Russian communists". BTW, I am not atheist, but I don't see how my personal religion should overlay a declaration of loyalty by all citizens to OUR country.

    September 10, 2013 at 1:27 pm |
  14. Dr Tom

    I was 7 yrs old when they added the 'under God' phrase. I remember thinking at that time – "How can they do that? I thought there was separation of church and state in this country." I guess Dana Perino would fail the "Are you smarter than a 7 yr old?" test.

    September 10, 2013 at 1:26 pm |
    • Bible Clown©

      They did it because Christians still run everything. No fair trials unless you Bible-thump and pray loud.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:28 pm |
      • Kat

        Funny you should say that Christians run the country when atheists have been able to ban prayer in school, ban the pledge of allegiance in some schools, ban Bible reading in schools, etc. Yeah, I can see where you would get the Christians run the country.

        September 10, 2013 at 1:40 pm |
        • Burke

          Prayer is not banned in school. Any child may pray at any time so long as they are not disrupting class. The principal or teachers may also pray as they like. The only thing that they can't do is lead a prayer that the students or other teachers must participate in. The same goes for reading the Bible. When I was in high school, we read the Book of Job as a literary example of tragedy. If the class had tried to read the Bible as a science book that would have been a different story. So stop making false or uninformed claims and get over your false persecuted christian myth.

          September 10, 2013 at 1:52 pm |
        • doobzz

          Under the First Amendment, teacher-led prayer and teacher-led bible study should not have been allowed in public schools in the first place.

          Children can still pray and read the bible in school if they wish, so no one is taking away any of your rights by insisting that the separation of church and state be enforced in public schools.

          If you don't like it, you can have your child indoctrinated in the religious school of your choice.

          September 10, 2013 at 1:53 pm |
  15. PenileImplant

    Man I "hate" deists.....so dumb and ego driven 🙁

    September 10, 2013 at 1:25 pm |
  16. Chiil Out

    At least agnostics are honest about the role of science in this debate. Agnostics are waiting for proof.

    Atheism is nothing more than a belief, just like Christianity or any other religion. There is no scientific proof that God exists. No one has proven that he does not. Aliens have never been discovered but we still search for them, spending billions on programs that are designed to intercept alien communications. To say "aliens do not exist" would be premature...nothing more than an opinion. The same holds true with God.

    At least agnostics are honest and say, "prove it but I don't know for sure". Atheism is nothing more than a premature assumption that the supernatural beings that billions have worshiped, and reported personal encounters with, throughout milllenia are figments of a billion imaginations. To me, that stance is more arrogant than any religion known to man.

    September 10, 2013 at 1:24 pm |
    • Tim

      I think you will find that a majority of atheists are actually agnostic about many things. The two are not mutually exclusive.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:27 pm |
    • Bible Clown©

      More like "I know it's true but I can't prove it absolutely." I can't search the whole infinite universe for signs of gods, but I don't think I have to. I know there's no God, but I can't prove it to YOU – that's agnosticism.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:36 pm |
      • Kzooresident

        That's one of the better descriptions of militant atheism I have seen in quite some time. It's absolutely no different from those who "know what they can't know" at the Westboro Baptist Church.

        September 10, 2013 at 1:39 pm |
        • Bible Clown©

          What a stupid thing to say. You must be still in high school. Try reading it again?

          September 10, 2013 at 1:43 pm |
        • Bible Clown©

          Try this: show me your proof of God's existence? Right. You haven't got any. A book says He's real. Same goes for Gandalf. Now, can I show you absolute proof of Gravity? Heck yeah, watch this brick fall. Can I show you momentum and centrifugal force, heck yeah. Can you show me a man turning water into wine, or coming back from the dead after a week? Heck no. So we both get down to what we believe, and what I believe is supported by facts. Your belief is supported by that book.
          Too long, can't read, head hurts? What I thought.

          September 10, 2013 at 1:56 pm |
    • Kzooresident

      It's good to see someone else acknowledging the fact that atheism is simply another religion.

      Unfortunately the militant atheists are not much different from militant iislamists in their need to orient the world around their belief.

      The worst part is when they drag children into the fight.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:37 pm |
      • Bible Clown©

        Only a fool thinks not believing in something is a belief. But thanks for playing, even though you lost in the first round.

        September 10, 2013 at 1:43 pm |
      • Duaniac

        Atheism is a Religon like "OFF" is a TV channel. Try reading a different book than the one you have in your hand.

        September 10, 2013 at 1:53 pm |
        • closet atheist

          Hilarious analogy!

          It's really quite simple. I don't understand why this is even an argument. It's unreal the straws people will grasp at.

          September 10, 2013 at 1:56 pm |
        • Bible Clown©

          Not even that, just logic. He wants to pretend science is also a competing religion. It just sounds dumb.

          September 10, 2013 at 1:57 pm |
    • Larry Larry

      Atheism and agnosticism are not mutually exclusive. Theism refers to what you believe, gnosticism refers to what you know. No one can absolutely know whether or not gods, leprechauns, or fairies exist, so we're agnostic about all of those things. Atheists simply don't believe in gods because of a lack of evidence, just like most people reject leprechauns and fairies on the same basis. You'll notice that we don't have labels for people who don't believe in leprechauns or fairies. It's more "I don't know whether or not gods exist, but I don't believe it's very likely." Saying atheism is a belief is like saying "not collecting stamps" is a hobby.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:39 pm |
    • Simon

      If atheism is a religion then bald is a hair color.

      September 10, 2013 at 2:00 pm |
  17. Harry

    The vast majority of Americans do believe in "one God" so there is no reason for someone to object to reciting the pledge of allegiance even if they don't believe in God. This is whole thing is about weak, insecure people trying to prove to themselves and everyone else how powerful they are, never realizing they are having the exact opposite effect. In the end, they just look petty, pathetic and pitiful. I also would like to thank the person who said atheism is a religion. This is true. Atheism is a just a replacement religion for the rebellious without a cause just as the search for extraterrestrial life is a religion for "scientists" without a real cause. These false religions are nothing new. They will come and go as surely and as quickly as the founder (and her entire family) of the American Atheist movement, robbed, murdered and incinerated by the very man she hired to run their sad organization.

    September 10, 2013 at 1:24 pm |
    • doobzz

      Have you ever heard of tyranny of the majority?

      September 10, 2013 at 1:28 pm |
    • Franklin

      I would disagree. It's my view that the Christian response is one of weakness and fearfulness.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:28 pm |
      • PatA

        One who doesn't understand faith would look at it as being weak and fearful. One with faith believes their strength comes from the Lord and fear is actually the beginning of wisdom. What I'll never understand is if atheists don't believe in any God, what do you live for? What are your characteristics modeled after? The majority of people in this country are Christians in one way or another so if an atheist doesn't want to recite the pledge then don't. How about youhomeschool your children? Why does 10% of this country dictate what 100% of it should do because they have an agenda? Absolutely ridiculous – walk through life clueless and your only thought after you die is that your body rots away or you get burned to ashes and that's it.....how sad. The beauty of it this is that I pray for non-believers all the time and will continue to do so.

        September 10, 2013 at 2:05 pm |
    • Sarah

      What? Maybe someday you'll make sense. Today? Not so much....

      September 10, 2013 at 1:28 pm |
    • Bible Clown©

      "This is whole thing is about weak, insecure people trying to prove to themselves and everyone else how powerful they are, never realizing they are having the exact opposite effect. In the end, they just look petty, pathetic and pitiful."
      Sorry, but that's your side. I'm not insecure about being smarter than you are, just naturally modest. I'd prefer it if you wised up and stopped believing in sky people who talk in your dreams on your own, instead of me having to call you down for being silly. Telling people to leave the USA, where differences of opinion settled by vote give us power, because they don't agree with you? That's the definition of insecure, petty, and pathetic.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:41 pm |
    • JediColt

      Leader of the American Atheists = robbed and murdered by the very man she hired to run her organization
      Jesus Christ – robbed and murdered by the very people he came here to save.
      Why are you so smug and happy about her fate?

      September 10, 2013 at 1:49 pm |
      • Bible Clown©

        Human nature. Bite the hand that feeds you.

        September 10, 2013 at 1:59 pm |
  18. Hard Hat

    Christians are atheist toward the other 23000 or so gods, fascinating that they actually believe all of those gods are false and theirs is real, and they get to not die, and get their loved ones back, and live for eternity, oh wow sounds good, sign me up, and ALL I have to do is show up with the fat people once a week and say the words "I accept jebbus into me heart"... so easy, think I'll try that, LOL

    September 10, 2013 at 1:24 pm |
    • Sarah

      Well, at least you proved one point. You're stupid. Congratulations!

      September 10, 2013 at 1:32 pm |
      • Bible Clown©

        No, Christians believe all those Gods are real, and they refuse to worship them. They also refuse to worship Athies, the God of the Athiests. One day they will learn how to spell, and then we will have to take them seriously, but it won't be soon.

        September 10, 2013 at 2:01 pm |
  19. Way Out There

    "In God We Trust" is on our currency. So, if atheists want to dump this offensive money, I will be happy to take it off their hands.

    September 10, 2013 at 1:24 pm |
    • doobzz

      It's not like we have a choice, you moron.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:27 pm |
    •  

      Godless Vagabond
      That silly phrase should be removed as well.

      September 10, 2013 at 1:27 pm |
    • Jumpin Jupiter

      That phrase on the currency is just as meaningless as saying that you pay homage to ancient gods with our calendar.

      Every week (52 times per year) in English-speaking places we have:

      Tuesday = Tiu's day (Norse god)
      Wednesday = Woden's day (Norse god)
      Thursday = Thor's day (Norse god)
      Friday = Frigga's day (Norse goddess)
      Saturday = Saturn's day (Roman god)

      And every year:
      January = in honor of Janus (Roman god)
      February = Roman purification rite, februa
      March = in honor of Mars (Roman god)
      April = in honor of Aphrodite (Greek goddess)
      May = in honor of Maia (Roman goddess)
      June = in honor of Juno (Roman goddess)

      September 10, 2013 at 1:33 pm |
      • Jacob

        Nice point.

        September 10, 2013 at 1:37 pm |
      • Way Out There

        Not disagreeing with you. The phrase "Under God" in the pledge is also just as meaningless, as well as the origins of the names of our planets. This is nothing but a call for attention by two extremist groups. Another thing to just separate people into "Liberal" and "Conservative." After all, there are no Democrats that believe in God. And there are no Republicans that are not Christian. Right?

        September 10, 2013 at 1:39 pm |
      • catocony

        You forgot the shout-out to paganism.

        Monday = day to venerate the moon
        Sunday = day to venerate the sun (Sol Invictus)

        September 10, 2013 at 1:40 pm |
    • Bible Clown©

      That will be next, and Christians will be all for it. Render unto "Caesar" what is "Caesar's" and unto God what is God's. God doesn't mint coins.

      September 10, 2013 at 2:06 pm |
  20. Harry

    There is no need for theoretical concepts like god to be applied here.

    September 10, 2013 at 1:23 pm |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.