home
RSS
September 17th, 2013
09:59 PM ET

Rick Warren on guns, God and son's tragic death

By Eric Marrapodi, CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Lake Forest, California (CNN) — In his first interview since his son's suicide in April, famed pastor Rick Warren told CNN that he knew his son, Matthew, had bought a gun, dismissed rumors that Matthew was gay and said he doesn't blame God for the tragedy.

"I have cried every single day since Matthew died," Warren said Tuesday in an exclusive interview with CNN.

"But that - that's actually a good thing. Grief is a good thing. It's the way we get through the transitions of life."

Rick Warren and his wife, Kay, founded Saddleback Church in Southern California in 1980, growing it from a small congregation to a multisite megachurch with some 20,000 weekly worshippers.

Warren is also author of the spiritual self-help guide “The Purpose Driven Life,” one of the best-selling books of all time, with more 36 million copies sold.

But even as the Warrens grew in prominence - attending conferences with presidents and prime ministers - their son Matthew struggled with borderline personality disorder and deep depression, they said during an interview with CNN’s Piers Morgan.

The Warrens said they are opening up about their son’s tragic death because they hope to end the stigma of mental illness and save another family from the pain they suffer.

They have slowly returned to the spotlight since grieving in private for five months.

MORE ON CNN: The five things you need to know about Rick Warren

The gun

Matthew Warren visited his parents on the night of April 5, just like so many nights before.

“I had made him dinner,” Kay Warren told CNN. “He laid his head down on the kitchen table and he just said ‘I'm so tired.’ He just said ‘I'm so tired.’”

After a hug from his dad, Matthew left his parents' house and went back to his own. He and his mom began texting, and the conversation veered toward suicide, Kay Warren said.

“I knew it was very desperate. And I also knew he – I knew he had a gun.”

Earlier, Matthew had told his parents he had illegally obtained a gun online - but if they called the police about the gun he would kill himself instantly.

Matthew Warren had tried to legally purchase a gun many times, his family said. Each time he was rebuffed because he had been forcibly admitted to a mental institution, a red flag on a California background check.

“We're grateful that the laws kept Matthew from getting the gun for as long as it did,” Rick Warren said.

When Matthew hit a roadblock buying a gun, he turned to other options.

"He was so desperate to end the pain,” Kay Warren said.

Ten days earlier, Matthew had tried to end his life by overdosing on pills, the Warrens said, one of several suicide attempts in his young life.

Matthew had begged his mother to help him die, Kay Warren said.

“I will do anything to help you live,” she recalls telling him, “but I will not help you take your life.”

The texting between Matthew and Kay Warren went on for hours on the night of April 5.

Then it stopped.

The Warrens headed to Matthew’s house. He did not come to the door. The lights were on, and they decided to leave, worried if they called the police Matthew would make good on his fatal promise.

The next morning they went back to his house. The lights were still on.

This time they called the police.

Rick and Kay Warren stood outside their son’s home sobbing in each others’ arms.

They knew.

A nod from a police officer who inspected Matthew's house confirmed the worst.

“I just hit the ground," Kay Warren said.

God's plan

Matthew had access to mental health care and all the love in the world but not even that could spare him, Rick Warren said.

“If love could have kept my child alive, he'd be alive today, because he was incredibly loved,” the pastor said.

The evangelical Christian said he doesn’t blame God for his son’s death.

“I never questioned my faith in God; I questioned God’s plan,” Rick Warren said. “God isn’t the blame for my son’s death. My son took his life. It was his choice.”

Kay Warren said the family’s faith and community support got them through the past five months. Condolence cards poured in from around the world; 30,000 by Saddleback Church’s count.

In their grief, Rick and Kay Warren said they turned to a familiar source, the Bible.

For Kay Warren, a verse from the New Testament brings comfort, she said. “It says our bodies are buried in brokenness, but they will be raised in glory.”

She recites the verse when visiting her son’s grave.

"Matthew's body was broken. That gun broke his body and he was buried in brokenness. But he's going to be raised in glory.”

GALLERY: Rick Warren over the years

Forgiveness

The Warrens said they struggle with anger that their son died using an illegally obtained firearm.

Before his death, Matthew told his parents he bought the gun online, but wouldn’t tell them from whom.

Investigators said the serial number was filed off when they recovered it from the scene. So far police have not been able to determine who sold Matthew Warren the gun.

“One of the hard things was forgiving the person who sold him the gun,” Rick Warren said. “Because I didn't want to forgive him.”

But the Warrens said their Christian faith, rooted in the belief that their own sins had been forgiven by Jesus, enabled them to forgive the person who sold the gun to their son.

“I don't want to be tied to that person emotionally for the rest of my life,” Kay Warren said.

Slightly more than half of Americans - 53% - think churches should do more to prevent suicide in America, according to a new poll by LifeWay Research, a Christian company based in Nashville.

Nearly half of evangelicals (48%) say people with serious mental illnesses like depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia can be cured by Bible study and prayer alone. Sixty percent of Americans overall disagree.

The Warrens said Matthew had access to good health care, but the system sometimes puts obstacles between families and their mentally ill loved ones.

Kay Warren pointed to difficulty families have in getting mentally ill family members help because of laws on patient privacy.

“The right to privacy and that right to autonomy, it's a dance,” she said.
 “I don't have good answers. It's a dance. So we've got to do a better job with that.”

Because the Warrens are conservative Christians who oppose same-sex marriage, rumors circulated about Matthew's sexuality in the days after his death.

The Warrens dismissed those rumors in the CNN interview.

“Well, first, Matthew wasn't gay, " Rick Warren said, "but if he was, we would have loved him unconditionally anyway. It wouldn't have made one difference at all.”

The Warrens said they have tried to stay away from online criticism and the rumors surrounding Matthew’s death so they can focus on his legacy: raising awareness about mental illness.

Hope

Asked why they had not prioritized mental illness earlier, the Warrens said that they did not want to thrust their troubled son into the limelight.

“It was his story to tell,” Rick Warren said.

Now telling Matthew’s story falls to his parents.

They want the world to remember a young man who was “funny, quirky, ridiculously silly.”

On his headstone the family put “compassionate warrior.”

They have established the Matthew Warren Fund to honor his memory. Rick Warren said they will wait a year and then hope to use the funds to help those struggling with mental illness and their families.

The Warrens want to spread the word that even though their story had a tragic ending, “There’s hope,” Kay Warren said. “It’s so important that people know, no matter how desperate their despair, there is hope, and not to give up.”

- CNN Religion Editor

Filed under: Death • Faith • Guns • Leaders • Violence

soundoff (1,411 Responses)
  1. bhartman36

    This is a terrible story, and my heart goes out to the Warren family.

    There's a lesson to be learned here: If you know someone is suicidal, don't screw around with it. Get them help. Get them committed for their own safety, if necessary, but do *not* assume that someone who is threatening suicide will "snap out of it". And no, it's not something you can "pray your way out of". Faith is a wonderful thing, for those who have it, but faith won't do anything for your brain chemistry.

    September 17, 2013 at 11:57 pm |
    • tony

      Now e all lkknow faith is awful failure and indiference, not wonderful at all.l

      September 17, 2013 at 11:59 pm |
      • bhartman36

        Faith can get people through tough times, and it allows people to carry on despite the knowledge that they're going to die someday. It's not completely useless. But I think this particular brand of faith led them to inaction, and that's definitely bad.

        September 18, 2013 at 12:03 am |
        • Gregg

          Did you even read the article or just tune out the parts where they talked about what they had done and had tried to do to get help for their son?

          September 18, 2013 at 12:21 am |
        • bhartman36

          I did read the article. I must've missed the part where they had their suicidal son involuntarily committed though. What paragraph was it in?

          September 18, 2013 at 12:32 am |
      • Stevie James

        Troll Tony, everyone has faith, yep even u, hahaha prove me u dont!

        September 18, 2013 at 12:18 am |
  2. Ann Turta

    The son was gay.

    September 17, 2013 at 11:56 pm |
    • bhartman36

      There's no reason to assume he was gay. Believe it or not, people can be suicidal for other reasons.

      September 17, 2013 at 11:58 pm |
    • Jack

      Why do people like you feel compelled to make things up?

      September 18, 2013 at 12:00 am |
    • Stevie James

      Ann Turta URL gay...

      September 18, 2013 at 12:17 am |
  3. kim

    What a phony. Loved their fantasy god more than their son. And afraid of what the world would think if their son happened to be gay. How do you not tear down the door if you think your son is killing himself or has killed himself?

    September 17, 2013 at 11:56 pm |
    • bhartman36

      I don't understand that, either. The reality is, by the time they got there, their son was probably already gone, but don't you at least try to get in there?

      September 18, 2013 at 12:01 am |
    • tony

      Must say that I agree.As a straight black man it still amazes me that religious leaders like Mr.. Warren take issues with gays ans God forbid have a gay child.

      September 18, 2013 at 12:08 am |
      • Stevie James

        Tony, it's amazing how dumb people really are. If someone chooses to be gay that's their business... Just because I choose to be not gay and abhor it doesn't mean I have to accept it. They said if there son was gay they would have loved him unconditionally.. Please learn to read. If someone was spreading rumors I was gay and then I died I would want my loved ones to clear the air...

        September 18, 2013 at 12:16 am |
        • hefailed

          Tell me Stevie ~ at what age did you choose to be straight?

          September 18, 2013 at 10:08 am |
    • reggie61224

      No matter what you think, the Warrens are still human beings deserving of compassion. Think about that.

      September 18, 2013 at 12:14 am |
      • concerned

        You have no clue what it is like or what you would have done until you have walked in their shoes. They are good people who loved their son. Be compassionate.

        September 18, 2013 at 8:31 am |
    • James

      That's not what the article said. If you read...... it said after their sons death people mentioned he was gay. Not they knew he was gay and dismmissed it or ignored him. They put their son first. They said he had been dealing with mentall illness for years. They went for help. The systems presented roadblocks.....period. They kept working with him and obvilously loved the heck out of the dude. He came over to the house for dinner. They talked, and texted their son that night and from the intimation, contiually. This is just you not liking Rick Warren and his beliefs. Separate what you don't like and focus on what the article is representing......mental illness. It hits everyone not just people who delcare a faith in something.

      September 18, 2013 at 12:16 am |
    • Stevie James

      Kim, Spoken like a true back seat cow girl.. I like how u give the answers now after the test... F for u and u knew the answer!

      September 18, 2013 at 12:20 am |
    • LinSea

      kim, what if it was YOUR son? What if you did what you could but he still found a way to kill himself and then people wrote the horrific, cruel, heartless things about YOU that they are writing about this man?

      September 18, 2013 at 1:40 am |
    • jubagwel

      Try reading the article before you comment it is plain to all why they didn't

      September 18, 2013 at 3:53 am |
  4. Bob

    The preacher and his wife failed their final exams. When it came time for them to sacrifice for the love of their Son, they didn't. When they knew he bought a gun in spite of being suicidal, the fact that they did nothing only indicates that they didn't care whether their Son lived or died.

    Then they went to his house, and when he didn't answer, they left. They were concerned enough to drive over there, but then did nothing. What miserable failures they are as parents.

    September 17, 2013 at 11:50 pm |
    • tony

      Probably prayed. That assuages the concience of the religious and saves having to do something difficult or awkward.

      September 17, 2013 at 11:58 pm |
      • Stevie James

        Ah tony, words of wisdom from a flaming troll? One thing about ur post is clear! Your to ignorant to understand, one day u will get it thou, I have hope...

        September 18, 2013 at 12:10 am |
    • Gregg

      The son was no longer a minor but an adult. He had threatened suicide if they tried to call the police. At least try a little to put yourself in that situation. It's so easy to judge from a distance.

      September 18, 2013 at 12:27 am |
    • Marissa Jones

      Bob, So glad I am not lone in thinking this whole story is very strange. Watched the program last night and commented. This morning, more convinced than ever that the parents were so comfortable that Matthew was going on to a better life that they gave up on helping him. Who can sleep at night knowing that there son might ( probably ) had shot himself. What if he was still alive and could have been saved. Crazy and dare I mention that this builds up their gathering, more sympathy from their followers etc etc $$$$ . So very sad

      September 18, 2013 at 9:50 am |
  5. Gambi

    Thank you for sharing your pain, your joy and the love of your son. I wish you both peace as you grieve my prayers and heart go out to you and your family. No one has the right to judge you or your son but God. Bless you.

    September 17, 2013 at 11:47 pm |
    • Leah

      How is 'sharing' your own dead son's most private pain to complete strangers, so you can remain in the spotlight, a good thing?

      September 17, 2013 at 11:52 pm |
      • Stevie James

        Leah, he would be in the spot light anyways.. People, are asking questions, better to put the rumors to bed than stay silent...

        September 18, 2013 at 12:08 am |
      • LinSea

        Because maybe it will help someone in a similar situation to realize a course of action that will help someone else with a mental illness. Or maybe because it will help someone who lost a loved one to suicide to know that there are other people out there who understand their pain. I don't know Mr. Warren, have never read his books or heard him preach, but just like you and me and everyone else on the planet, everyone makes mistakes and errors in judgment, and things happen that in hindsight maybe we should have handled differently. But still, the man lost his son. Why is it so hard to have some empathy or compassion for someone who is grieving the loss of a child and will carry that pain with him throughout his life?

        September 18, 2013 at 1:34 am |
  6. Leah

    How does that man take solace in exposing his own deceased son's most personal issues to millions of strangers? It's almost like he's reaching for sick attention at the expense of his dead son's memory. Keyword: Sick.

    September 17, 2013 at 11:46 pm |
  7. Renee Brown

    Please be sensitive when posting. Too many people are hurting from the loss of a loved one through suicide. If you get the chance, read When The Devil Visits about a woman who lost 4 family members to suicide. It will change your perspective.

    September 17, 2013 at 11:46 pm |
    • Athy

      I can see losing maybe one or two family members, but losing four borders on carelessness.

      September 17, 2013 at 11:52 pm |
      • Stevie James

        Read about the Von ericks wrestling family. Athy u know me thing about mental illness? If u do, there's work to be done!

        September 18, 2013 at 12:22 am |
        • Athy

          Want to try that again in English, Stevie?

          September 18, 2013 at 12:35 am |
  8. David

    What would Jesus think of Rick? He is a minister that is worth $25 mil. What does he do the help the poor?

    September 17, 2013 at 11:45 pm |
    • tony

      Wjhat was he worth before he had a church???

      September 18, 2013 at 12:00 am |
    • Stevie James

      I bet u do so much to help the poor u can criticize? His giving and financial situation is up to him. It's not ur business, I like how u trolls get off on telling others what's good for them, when u don't even follow your own advice! Hypocrites..

      September 18, 2013 at 12:04 am |
    • Burningguitar

      Let's see. Educates Africans about the dangers of AIDS through the PEACE plan, paid back 25 years of his salary, gives away 90% of his income, speaks at the church for free, and still lives in the same house he's had for years and years. He is not the greedy guy everyone so carelessly claims. Check the facts, they're all available. He's the real deal who is getting attacked for standing on his principles.

      September 18, 2013 at 12:19 am |
    • jubagwel

      what do you do to help the poor?

      September 18, 2013 at 3:54 am |
  9. roni

    THIS IS TRULY A TRAGEDY! I AM NO ONE TO BE CRITICAL, MY HEART GOES OUT TO THE WARRENS

    September 17, 2013 at 11:44 pm |
    • Dippy

      No caps lock, please. It makes you appear childish. Are you?

      September 17, 2013 at 11:54 pm |
  10. Person

    Twloha.com

    To Write Love On Her Arms.

    September 17, 2013 at 11:44 pm |
  11. Dick

    Yeah of course it's not God's fault because that would insinuate that God was saying it's okay to be gay. God is never to blame when anything bad happens to the radical nutjobs.

    September 17, 2013 at 11:41 pm |
    • Stevie James

      Ya radical nut jobs like u who troll message boards looking to kick someone when he's down. Saying God is to blame is like saying its ur fault u woke up today! Well guess what one day it will be ur fault u don't wake up!

      September 18, 2013 at 12:02 am |
  12. maria

    This man is in denial, he is a phony really ...my son is depressed ,suffer mental illness, rumors he is gay , tying to overdose in pills, and don't let the police know about it? the police will know how to act, without any excuses of he was going to kill himself if they let them know? this people are so into the Bible and their beliefs that they forgot about the pain their son was in ! it makes me sick that the son was looking for help in different ways ,but this parents didn't help him ,when you suffer from depression the best medicine is the family compassion, help, understanding, communication, be there for him but he was pretty busy being a pastor I have the feeling he dislike his son because the rumors of him being gay ,I just don't trust this man ! in my heart he was totally alone ..........RIP my dear lonely soul!

    September 17, 2013 at 11:41 pm |
    • Stevie James

      Actually, ur in denial. U know nothing about the situation. It's ez to sit back in urn posh life and criticize, do u honestly think if I want to kill myself anyone could stop me? Sometimes, death is the way out. And guess what one day u will find out!

      September 17, 2013 at 11:59 pm |
      • bhartman36

        It's not impossible to prevent someone's suicide. That's what involuntary committal is for. You commit the person and put them on anti-depressants until they're stable and no longer suicidal.

        September 18, 2013 at 12:06 am |
        • Stevie James

          Ya and people can play that game and when they get out boom. It happens all the time in prisons.. Every inmate knows u play the game, it's no different in this situation. Anti-depressants aren't the be all..

          September 18, 2013 at 12:25 am |
        • Gregg

          Read the article again, he had been, more than once. That's why he couldn't buy a gun.

          September 18, 2013 at 12:34 am |
        • bhartman36

          There's no maximum number of times you can be committed. If he was suicidal, he should've been in a hospital. Would it have guaranteed he didn't kill himself? No, but it could've gotten him through that crisis. He might have (probably did) need more intensive care than he got his first time around, but you don't just hope for the best when you know someone is suicidal and has a gun. You intervene immediately.

          September 18, 2013 at 12:42 am |
  13. internetisgay

    Am I supposed to know who this guy is?

    September 17, 2013 at 11:40 pm |
    • Stevie James

      He sold 36 million books, more than any other author. What u live in a cave? Or better yet in a hole! He spoke at Obama's address... Wake the he77 up and know what's going on, and p.s. y did u read this story then?

      September 17, 2013 at 11:53 pm |
      • Tom Watson

        @stevie james What crawled up your butt today? That's not a very Godlike response now is it?

        September 18, 2013 at 12:05 am |
        • Stevie James

          Mr Watson, unfortunately I am nothing like God. So how can I be like him. I'm a sinner saved by grace period!

          September 18, 2013 at 12:27 am |
  14. rino

    Famed pastor. The term seems a contradiction. I am no fan of rich pastors. Maybe this is Karma.

    September 17, 2013 at 11:39 pm |
    • Stevie James

      No Karma is what comes around goes around. I can't think of any Karma that would equate to having a son kill himself. 2ndly, what? Pastors should be broke? No matter how much money u have, it's the love of it that will do u in!

      September 17, 2013 at 11:56 pm |
      • Mel

        Eye of the beholder, or eye of the needle?

        September 18, 2013 at 12:03 am |
        • Stevie James

          What do u consider rich Mel, choose your next words carefully? U will be judged by same measure...

          September 18, 2013 at 12:29 am |
  15. rh

    Uh, no, there are many diseases that are worse, because you *want* to live, and living is harder than dying. Ask anyone who is significantly disabled.

    And there are many parents who believe their children are troubled, but they are more troubled than their child but ignore it.

    SInce I used to cut myself and had suicidal thoughts, I can speak to my children from a position of experience, that things will get better if you make them better. It is shocking to some how much control one really has over their own life, and those who are privileged and lucky sometimes make it harder for those who have to work for success, or redefine success when their parents set too high a bar.

    September 17, 2013 at 11:33 pm |
    • PJ

      There are two kinds of depression. Depression that is situational like you said having family troubles and such, and also depression that is biochemical for no reason. It is an illness. Clearly, suicide is the way people die. Just like how people die of other illnesses. I don't know if it is a matter of strength and believing that it will get better. I had it for many years and I am better now. I don't think I am stronger than others. I don't know why I am here and others don't make it. I do remember the lethargy. I remember physically feeling so achy and like there was weights on my eyelids and unable to get out of bed. The physical and mental pain is more than others who didn't experience it even know.

      September 18, 2013 at 8:59 am |
  16. i_know_everything

    you are responsible for his death, ONLY YOU, YOU KILLED HIM, live with it

    September 17, 2013 at 11:33 pm |
    • Stevie James

      And u are responsible for being an idiot! Period!

      September 17, 2013 at 11:50 pm |
    • maria

      Amen! exactly I think he is a hypocrite and dislike gay ,he is a phony!

      September 17, 2013 at 11:54 pm |
  17. annieL

    Every parent's worst nightmare, worse even than death from physical disease, accident or war. To know how troubled your child is and yet be unable to save his or her life. Hopefully, Matthew's suffering is over. I would like to hear what the preacher has to say about suicide. He said in this article, "It was his choice." Instead of blaming God, he puts the blame on a mentally ill person. I don't think that's accurate and certainly not compassionate, as Jesus taught. People who don't have control over their mental faculties don't have free will to choose their actions. Maybe none of us do.

    September 17, 2013 at 11:29 pm |
    • Leah

      Why does he seem compelled to put the blame on anybody in the open media, or even in his mega church? He is using his deceased son's personal and private pain for his own attention.

      September 17, 2013 at 11:50 pm |
  18. Confirmed

    These comments confirm every stereotype of miserable liberals.

    Congrats, CNN, on hosting the skid marks of the Internet. I will not miss you.

    September 17, 2013 at 11:28 pm |
    • Mike

      I am a liberal and I find some of the above comments to be completely detestable. Some people have a lot of nerve and no empathy, but I always try to see them in the same light as God – He loves them, unconditionally, manifested through Jesus Christ 🙂 Peace!

      September 17, 2013 at 11:48 pm |
      • maria

        Oh really? you are going to "detest" my statement too....tell me where were your GOD when this man commit suicide? when the madness in this world occur? when a child gets rapped and killed? tell me please where is your GOD? and you are such a hypocrite like Mr. Warren you talking about your Jesus Crist and blaspheming using the word 'DETEST" a word that I don't use ,even if I am not a religious person at all!

        September 17, 2013 at 11:59 pm |
        • pittnut@gmail.com

          Dad was always busy selling religious bs to others and with useless prayers, didn't have too much time for son.
          He himself says that he prayed that this day will never come and yet it has come. And now he's again out there, selling even more religious bs

          September 18, 2013 at 12:03 am |
        • Burningguitar

          God gave this world in our care. Look what a fantastic job we are doing with it.

          September 18, 2013 at 12:22 am |
        • James

          So that "God" you speak of as right there when he was born and there when he died. He didn't force himself on him of force hm to make decisions. He, like you have free will to make choices. Just because my "father" is a pastor, doesn't mean I have to "believe". Yep, crappy thisngs happen in this world and God hurst behind it. Why, because men make decisions to do bad things. In turn there are men who make decisions to do good things. If God stepped in each and every time regarless our decisions, now he's mkaing youdo what you don't want and you'd be saying, "why is God always in the way?". If you beleive there is a GOd, obvius becase you speak of him and speak against him and what he represent, then surely you must believe and at least know there the opposite embodiment going on.....ummmm the devil or just say evil in this world.

          September 18, 2013 at 12:34 am |
        • Mike

          Maria, I am sorry my comment made you angry. I'm not sure why? Yes, I feel that "You are responsible for his death, ONLY YOU, YOU KILLED HIM, live with it," is a very detestable comment. In the wake of someones death, this is a very hateful and cruel thing to say to anyone, whether you like them or not.

          Secondly, where is my God in the moment of tragedy? I believe that we are, as in we I mean everyone in society, are the hands and feet of God. It's amazing to see how people can step up and help someone in the midst of their adversities. For example, in the wake of the floods here in Colorado – people from all over our community (Boulder, Denver, Broomfield, Loveland, Longmont) have stepped up to help out. This I believe is the manifestation of God's grace and mercy in this world, thats where my God is in the moment of tragedy and despair. My God works through all of us, through our love and altruism toward one another – whether you are Buddhist, Hindu, Atheist, Jewish, Muslim, or Christian.

          Also, I am just curious what makes me a hypocrite? Since you said I was a hypocrite.

          Cheers. Mike

          September 18, 2013 at 1:04 am |
  19. Moses

    Terrible tragedy, but I feel the Warrens could have done much more to help their son. To have just left the son's house and gone home on the night of his suicide is beyond belief. I would have broken the door down if I thought my son was inside and about to kill himself.

    September 17, 2013 at 11:28 pm |
    • Stevie James

      Really, u would have broken down their door? Then what if he shot himself right in front of u? He wanted to end his life period, there is nothing u can do once the mind is made up! Nothing!

      September 17, 2013 at 11:49 pm |
    • Timothy

      It isn't that simple but does highlight the tragedy. People who suffer Borderline Personality Disorder express thoughts and actions of suicide quite frequently. As a physician I will tell you the most horrific suicide attempts came from patients with BPD. I imagine the Warren's did wish they broke the door down that night, but it clear only in hindsight. To have a child with this condition would require frequently breaking the door down or merely taking away any sense of independence. By far the most frightening condition to handle in my practice.

      September 17, 2013 at 11:51 pm |
      • Mary

        Doesn't borderline personality develop during abusive childhoods? People are born predisposed to having personality disorders, but usually the family environment causes the illness. I wonder what was going on in their home.

        September 17, 2013 at 11:56 pm |
        • pittnut@gmail.com

          Dad was always busy selling religious bs to others and with useless prayers, didn't have too much time for son.
          He himself says that he prayed that this day will never come and yet it has come. And now he's again out there, selling even more religious bs

          September 18, 2013 at 12:02 am |
        • Liss86

          I recieved the BPD diagnoses at 14. I don't remember any abuse, and aside from being bullied in school, had a happy life with two loving parents and siblings.
          I did find out later that my birth family has a long, nasty history of mental illness. I honestly believe it is a genetic predisposition that may be triggered by any childhood trauma, even something that might seem petty.

          September 18, 2013 at 12:08 am |
        • Timothy

          Childhood trauma can be more frequent but not always the case. It has been nice to see the postings by Lisa86 that does show the etiology is complex and happy that she got DBT, which is the best treatment for the condition. Like many psychiatric conditions there can be an underlying genetic predisposition, most commonly seen in Bipolar Disorder. But there are cases where there is no associated abuse, trauma or genes within the family to connect to the condition. I have seen this with Schizophrenia and countless other conditions.

          September 18, 2013 at 12:25 am |
        • LinSea

          Not necessarily, Mary. There are studies which show that BPD has physiological causes, genetic associations, and it has been observed through neuroimaging that people who suffer from it have abnormalities in the structure of their brains. Researchers have also found unusual neurochemistry in BPD sufferers.

          September 18, 2013 at 2:11 am |
      • Dippy

        Warrens, not Warren's.

        September 17, 2013 at 11:57 pm |
    • maria

      They didn't do nothing ,they are pretty busy making millions with the "church" remember they are pastors ,I always said the pastors are into making money from idiotic people who pay them to listen to read a bible ,amen!

      September 18, 2013 at 12:02 am |
      • pittnut@gmail.com

        Amen, you are right!

        September 18, 2013 at 12:04 am |
  20. Susan

    Actually God _is_ the tragedy. Man would have better understanding of life and its diversity without God enslaving and clouding Man's thinking in this universe. Religion poisons everything. The damage is done. You cannot extricate yourself from this fantasy.

    September 17, 2013 at 11:18 pm |
    • John

      Pretty prejudicial

      September 17, 2013 at 11:28 pm |
      • JP

        prejudice is the purview of a CHRISTIANINTY....

        THEY HATE....nothing else – HATE ONLY...

        STUPID JOHN....

        September 17, 2013 at 11:37 pm |
    • karenascofield

      Careful, Rationalism vs. Religion is a false dilemma and that is irrational, a logic error, a negative dualism . It's The Forces of Good™ vs. The Forces of Evil™ (what monotheism used to squelch competing religions or any heiracy) with a modern twist but it's not the improvement people whining about the old dualism should hope for, I would like to think.

      September 17, 2013 at 11:37 pm |
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
Advertisement
About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.