home
RSS
Satanists want statue next to 10 Commandments
A Ten Commandments monument erected outside the Oklahoma state Capitol.
December 9th, 2013
01:46 PM ET

Satanists want statue next to 10 Commandments

By Daniel Burke, CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor
[twitter-follow screen_name='BurkeCNN']

(CNN) - Lots of lawmakers have been accused of devilish behavior, but Oklahoma's state capitol may become the first to actually have a monument to Satan.

If a New York-based group called the Temple of Satan gets its way, a statue of the Evil One would sit next to the recently erected 10 Commandments monument on state capitol grounds.

"They said they wanted to be open to different monuments," said Lucien Greaves, a spokesman for the Temple of Satan, "and this seems like a perfect place to put that to the test."

Greaves and some legal experts say the Constitution is clear: the government can't endorse one particular religion. So, if a state capitol has a monument to one faith, it must allow monuments to others as well.

The Temple of Satan is less a religious body organized around rituals and regular meetings than a roving band of political provocateurs, said Greaves. They believe Satan is a "literary construct," the spokesman said, not an actual being with horns and hooves.

Last year, the Temple organized a gay and lesbian kiss-in at the gravesite of the mother of anti-gay preacher and activist the Rev. Fred Phelps. It also held a rally at Florida's state capitol in support of a law that allows "inspirational messages" at public school assemblies.

"It allows us to spread the message of Satanism," which centers around respect for diversity and religious minorities, said Greaves.

Oklahoma legislators voted to erect the Ten Commandments monument in 2009, using private funds donated by Rep. Mike Rietz, a surgeon and Southern Baptist deacon.

Rietz declined to comment on the Satanists' proposal on Monday, citing an separate and ongoing dispute with the American Civil Liberties Union over the Ten Commandments monument.

Oklahoma state Rep. Bob Cleveland told CNN that he's not in favor of the Satanist's proposed statue.

"I believe that only monuments that reflect Oklahoma values should be allowed on capitol the capitol grounds," Cleveland said in an e-mail on Monday.

But if Christians and Jews can have their monument to the 10 Commandments, then Satanists must be allowed to erect their own statue, said Brady Henderson, legal director of the American Civil Liberty Union's Oklahoma chapter.

"We feel like the Satanic Temple has a very strong argument to say that, if the state allows one religious monument, you have to allow others," Henderson said.

Oklahoma's statehouse grounds already has monuments honoring its heritage and Native American history, said Trait Thompson, chair of the Capitol Preservation Commission.

"Individuals and groups are free to apply to place a monument or statue or artwork," Thompson said.

The commission then determines whether the proposal abides by its standards and votes on whether to approve it.

Greaves said he's received the required forms from Oklahoma's Capitol Preservation Commission and is working on a design that will meet its standards.

"We want something big and bold that will be able to stand up to the weather or whatever other kinds of assaults," that may target the monument, he said.

"My favorite idea right now is an object of play for children. We want kids to see that Satanism is where the fun is."

The Temple of Satan created a Indiegogo fundraising page on Monday, but have thus far only publicly raised $150 towards its goal of $20,000.

Not all Satanist groups see the fun in political provocations.

Magus Peter Gilmore, head of the Church of Satan, which was founded by Anton LaVey in 1966, said he believes in strict separation of church and state.

"Rather than placing multiple 'advertisements' for various religions, we think it best for the (10 Commandments) monument to be removed to private property and that there be no objects supporting religion of any sort placed on the statehouse grounds," Gilmore said.

Earlier this year, Gilmore's Church of Satan squared off against a British group of Satanists over abortion rights, after activists shouted "Hail Satan" to drown out anti-abortion activists at the Texas state capitol.

READ MORE: Satanists square off on abortion (Yes, really)

- CNN Religion Editor

Filed under: Belief • Church and state • Culture wars • Devil • Satanism

soundoff (3,610 Responses)
  1. joeknockz

    Satanism is blasphemous and it's a false religion. Anyone who preaches or follows satanism will be destroyed. This is even preached in satanism and that's the odd thing, yet a few become warped enough to follow it any way. There's no satan without Jesus and vice versa... So the odd thing about this is the Satanists are acknowledging Christianity and that the things in the bible are true...but going against the way it's taught and that Satan is the victor. If there is Satan and there is Jesus, and they are real forces in the world, then it's not about which one is right, or wrong..it's about what do they represent. Satanism represents the acknowledgment of Christ but going against it even knowing it's real. It's not like atheism where you just say there is no God. It's saying there IS a God, and I hate him. If there IS a God (which Christians and Satanists believE) then you do not allow someone to have a statue dishonoring him. It's not a religion. It's a False religion built to only be against an existing religion. With no Christianity there is no Satanism. Don't let the devil fool you. It can't even be a religion. And it doesn't deserve the smallest statue in tribute to it.

    December 9, 2013 at 4:31 pm |
    • Edwin

      Many Americans are of the opinion that Satanism is no more false than Christianity. Why should we have to tolerate the one you like but not the one you don't?

      December 9, 2013 at 4:34 pm |
    • Ted

      Wow, joeknockz, you are really maxing out the deluded wacko scale. Bending the needle. Yikes!

      December 9, 2013 at 4:35 pm |
    • Dave

      Christianity is blasphemous and it's a false religion. Anyone who preaches or follows christianity will be destroyed. This is even preached in bible and that's the odd thing, blah blah blah

      December 9, 2013 at 4:35 pm |
      • joeknockz

        See that's the thing, satanism ONLY knocks Christianity. It doesn't have it's own creative idea. It uses Christianity's idea, but only takes the villan from Christianity and says "praise him!". Since Christianity IS the only foundation for Satanism, A Satanist CANNOT say they believe what you just said Dave without saying their own religion is bull. YOU can say it since you're outside the window. And every thing you say about some OTHER religion is right. They should have a statue. But NOT a "Religion" built only to counter another religion. That's only a false religion. Christianity is NOT a false religion, it has it's own ideas.

        December 9, 2013 at 4:44 pm |
        • Al Russell

          See, and here's the crux of the issue. YOU don't have the right to decide what is or is not a "real" religion. So, you either allow religion into the State (ALL of it) or you do not. Bottom line is YOU aren't in charge. Legally, all religions have the same "rights" as yours do. That's not how you want to play it though. You only want YOUR religion (or ones you approve of) to count. Luckily, we don't live in the joeknockz monarchy.

          December 9, 2013 at 4:52 pm |
        • Adam

          You are wrong. Educate yourself: churchofsatan.com

          December 9, 2013 at 5:02 pm |
        • dnl2002

          You seem to be confused. You realize that Judaism and Islam are all religions of Abraham and they have the Old Testament too, right? Christianity doesn't hold a monopoly on the stories...

          December 9, 2013 at 5:45 pm |
        • ME II

          If Satan is believed to be the supernatural being that can free man from the slavery of God and Jesus, then why can't people worship Him?

          December 9, 2013 at 5:50 pm |
    • Madtown

      it's a false religion
      ----
      As opposed to the "true" religion. And, which one is that again?

      December 9, 2013 at 4:40 pm |
    • Fedup

      Joe... buddy... the point is THEY ARE ALL FALSE RELIGIONS.

      December 9, 2013 at 5:12 pm |
    • Fedup

      Joe... buddy... THEY ARE ALL FALSE RELIGIONS. C'mon man, wake up. Open your mind just a little bit.

      December 9, 2013 at 5:14 pm |
  2. Al Russell

    Hmm. The Christians are awfully quiet on this forum. Not surprising though. Whenever I've tried to point out to those who support Christian monuments in Courthouses or school prayer that it opens the door for faiths OTHER than theirs as well, I've been met with an overwhelming silence. There seems to be a total disconnect when it comes to imagining being on the receiving end of the situation. Now that we have a real life example there is little to no intelligent input from the side of those in favor of this monument.

    December 9, 2013 at 4:27 pm |
    • Michael

      I'm a Christian and I support separation of Church and State. Cromwell – 'nuff said.

      I would be extremely interested in seeing what image of Satan they would use for the monument.

      December 9, 2013 at 4:40 pm |
      • Madtown

        Sarah Palin?

        December 9, 2013 at 4:42 pm |
        • Lucifer's Evil Twin

          Now THAT was funny right there...

          December 9, 2013 at 5:25 pm |
    • haaa

      Hello. I'm Presbyterian. I agree with you that there should be no religious monuments at all in government buildings, nor should there be any school prayer in public schools. I know plenty of other Christians who feel that way as well. Separation of church and state is crucial. People should have freedom of religion, and freedom from religion. Also, if these folks are successful in their efforts to put up a Statue of Satan, then good for them. If that's what it takes to fight back against people who attempt to violate the separation of church and state, then so be it.

      December 9, 2013 at 4:47 pm |
  3. Edwin

    If they are a real religious group that worships the representation, they should be allowed to have a statue there - but most of what I have read suggests they do not really worship Satan... so if this is just a test of the law, it lacks substance.

    December 9, 2013 at 4:27 pm |
    • tony

      The original 10 commandments are only a legend too.

      December 9, 2013 at 4:29 pm |
      • Edwin

        But the point is that there ARE people who devoutly believe in the Ten Commandments. There are not really people who devoutly believe in a being called Satan.

        December 9, 2013 at 5:05 pm |
    • Dave

      Not all Satanists necessarily worship Satan. Some worship man himself.

      December 9, 2013 at 4:30 pm |
      • Edwin

        Exactly. If they worship man, then putting a statue of Satan on display is not sincere religious belief. If they instead want to put a statue of Man in all his/her glory, that would be more sincere.

        December 9, 2013 at 4:35 pm |
        • Dave

          Not sure which sect want's the statue, but I believe it's a mix of sincerity and proving a point.

          December 9, 2013 at 4:39 pm |
        • Edwin

          I do know either. If they are sincere, I think they should have the right to have the statue... but I am getting weary of people trying to prove points over and over that do not actually really mean that much to them.

          December 9, 2013 at 5:07 pm |
    • Al Russell

      This particular faction may or may not qualify as a religion under the law, but there are most definitely Satanic churches that DO in the US. The legal issue is a valid one regardless. Either you support religion being incorporated into the State or you do not. Once that door is opened ALL faiths would have to be equally recognized, no picking and choosing by certain factions. I've been trying to explain this to those who advocate school prayer for years, that if they are allowed to bring Christianity into public school they will one day have to contend with their children being exposed to something THEY don't believe as well. This situation simply brings that concept to reality. Maybe NOW these folks will understand how it feels to have a religion you do not believe in shoved down your throat. Asking them to use their imaginations obviously wasn't effective.

      December 9, 2013 at 4:35 pm |
    • Byron

      It lacks substance either way. The only purpose of this charade is to annoy and gain publicity. Statues are symbols, nothing more. Religious implements do not belong on public grounds in this day and age. True religion is love felt and demonstrated, but the religious (so-called) have yet to value this fundamental spiritual truth.

      December 9, 2013 at 4:39 pm |
  4. Jesus said he came not to abolish the Law

    So then why don't Christians follow his COMMANDMENTS?

    December 9, 2013 at 4:26 pm |
    • Byron

      The "law" as the Master understood it and what was then commonly accepted as "law" may have been two different points of view. For example, a woman taken in adultery was subject to stoning under the law. But the Master indicated that mercy and forgiveness was the higher law, therefore suspending the law of condemnation and death in such cases. Love, it seems , was the only real "law" in Jesus' eyes in Jesus' eyes and with this "law" as his consciousness, he transcended and controlled matter, which was no match for the Master. Christians, so-called, don't seem to understand any of this, which begs the question, are they really "Christians" or pretenders?

      December 9, 2013 at 4:47 pm |
  5. ME II

    While Satanism is just as silly as other religions, hopefully this ploy will make legislatures think twice about the monuments they put up.

    December 9, 2013 at 4:26 pm |
  6. Vic

    There is a heritage issue here. The United States has a strong Christian heritage, and most places in America that like to erect monuments on public grounds, like the 10 Commandments ones, stem from that strong Christian heritage of America. You can separate church and state but you shall be able to keep your "non-adverse" heritage if you choose to.

    December 9, 2013 at 4:25 pm |
    • Street Epistemologist In Training

      Should your heritage exclude others?

      December 9, 2013 at 4:27 pm |
      • Vic

        It's not about excluding others, it is about relevance.

        December 9, 2013 at 4:28 pm |
        • Dave

          What's relative to some, may not be relative to others.

          December 9, 2013 at 4:32 pm |
        • Dave

          Sorry, "relevant". Same deal though.

          December 9, 2013 at 4:33 pm |
        • WordUpToo

          and only the Christans get to say what is relevant and what is not? Pffffft....

          December 9, 2013 at 4:34 pm |
        • cw

          ... and by so doing, you exclude others, all in the name of "heritage"

          December 9, 2013 at 4:36 pm |
      • Street Epistemologist In Training

        Who gets to decide relevance? Couldn't relevance be the juxtaposition of beliefs?

        December 9, 2013 at 4:32 pm |
    • tony

      It has a greater Native American heritage, and the historically unique heritage of dropping atomic bombs on civilian cities.

      December 9, 2013 at 4:28 pm |
      • ME II

        To be honest, I think the atomic bomb dropping is more history than heritage.

        December 9, 2013 at 4:30 pm |
        • Edwin

          It is history, but it is also a part of the legacy of the United States... hence the word heritage.

          December 9, 2013 at 4:32 pm |
        • ME II

          I understood heritage to pertain more to those things inherited and not necessarily done by the group, but I won't belabor the point.


          Full Definition of HERITAGE
          1: property that descends to an heir
          2a : something transmitted by or acquired from a predecessor : legacy, inheritance
          b : tradition
          3: something possessed as a result of one's natural situation or birth : birthright

          December 9, 2013 at 4:38 pm |
      • Vic

        According to the article, the site already has Native American history displays.

        As far as the atomic bombs go, Japan practiced kamikazes in World War II to achieve its imperial goals at any cost, and they were not going to stop, just like Germany, if it was not for the United States.

        December 9, 2013 at 4:38 pm |
    • In Santa we trust

      Should your heritage overrule the law?

      December 9, 2013 at 4:29 pm |
    • ME II

      And yet so few monuments to the Mayflower Compact or the Age of Enlightenment.

      December 9, 2013 at 4:29 pm |
      • Vic

        A reference from the Bible is representative enough for all the relevance of the Christian heritage of America, including the Mayflower Compact, which by the way, was a first form of the Government of the United States.

        December 9, 2013 at 4:44 pm |
        • ME II

          @Vic
          "A reference from the Bible is representative enough for all the relevance of the Christian heritage of America, including the Mayflower Compact, which by the way, was a first form of the Government of the United States."

          I wasn't talking about references to religion, but the heritage of America.
          Also, the Compact was not the first form of Government of the United States, nor even in the Americas, nor even the first European government in the Americas. I think the first was Jamestown.

          December 9, 2013 at 4:57 pm |
    • Madtown

      This is another way of saying, that the religion you prefer(if any) is largely dependent on where you're from, not which one is "correct".

      December 9, 2013 at 4:29 pm |
      • Vic

        Clever take; however, I believe it had already been long enough for the people of the United States to make their believed to be correct choice of belief. As a matter of fact, the "Free Exercise" of the Christian Faith was the reason for migration to the New World and the foundation of America.

        December 9, 2013 at 4:48 pm |
        • Madtown

          People will follow whichever religion they feel is right for them. That doesn't mean it's the "true and correct" one, because no such religion exists. Someone born in Egypt believes in the muslim way, as passionately as you believe in the christian way. Neither of you are incorrect, or correct.

          December 9, 2013 at 4:59 pm |
        • Fedup

          The simple fact that you believe that your religion... or ANY religion...is the "one true religion" is the reason for so much division between Christians, Muslims, Jews, etc. Religion is divisive by it's very nature. Please.... PLEASE....take your head out of that useless book, free yourself from that silly religion of yours (it's a scary thought, I know, but believe me when you finally do you will not believe the inner freedom you feel) and go enjoy life! Stop wasting this life worrying about a non-existent "after life".

          December 9, 2013 at 5:23 pm |
    • Edwin

      You talk of that heritage as if it were monlithic, but it is nowhere near that. Many of the Christian groups in the United States were diametrically opposed to other Christian groups. If you really want to get at the heart of it, the United States was based on Deist beliefs rather than Christian ones - so while the Ten Commandments might actually have reasonable justification, references to Jesus would not.

      That said, the Founders were very keenly in favor of allowing ANY religious group to worship without persecution. They would have accepted the rights of Satanists as quickly as the rights of Baptists or Lutherans or Mormons or Muslims or anybody else.

      December 9, 2013 at 4:31 pm |
      • Vic

        Your assessment was fair enough right until the last statement, which I believe could had not been the case.

        The primary reason for establishing the Separation of Church and State was to prevent a certain Christian denomination to take over the nation through the rule of government but not to prevent religion. Later on, the wall of separation became a mechanism for many other things.

        Regarding your last statement, keep in mind that the United States is a Christian nation by the majority of its people, even though the form of government is quasi-secular, and I don't believe the 'satanist' thing would've have flown form the get go.

        December 9, 2013 at 5:02 pm |
      • Vic

        Your assessment was fair enough right until the last statement, which I believe could had not been the case.

        The primary reason for establishing the Separation of Church and State was to prevent a certain Christian denomination to take over the nation through the rule of government but not to prevent religion. Later on, the wall of separation became a mechanism for many other things.

        Regarding your last statement, keep in mind that the United States is a Christian nation by the majority of its people, even though the form of government is quasi-secular, and I don't believe the 'satanist' thing would've flown form the get go.

        December 9, 2013 at 5:02 pm |
        • Street Epistemologist In Traing

          Vic, why do you believe the USA is a quasi-secular nation. I think you are making things up and prentending to know things you don't.

          December 9, 2013 at 5:06 pm |
        • Vic

          While the United States Government DOES NOT establish any religion, its Constitution was founded on Natural Law, which the Founders believed is the law of Nature's God.

          December 9, 2013 at 5:18 pm |
        • Street Epistemologist In Training

          The founders thought many things but the only thing that counts is what's actually in the const!tution and there is no mention of any god. I think you are pretending to know things you don't so that you feel better about excluding others' beliefs. Why do you believe only your beliefs are correct? Are you open to your beliefs being wrong?

          December 9, 2013 at 5:35 pm |
        • ME II

          @Vic,
          Technically, it was the Declaration, not the Consti.tution, and I don't think "Natural Laws" means what you think it does. It is more a philosophical basis for a legal system, rather than a religious basis for a government.

          December 9, 2013 at 5:41 pm |
    • Ted

      The sooner that we lose that claimed heritage of Christianity and all the unreason that is part and parcel of it, the better.

      December 9, 2013 at 4:32 pm |
      • WordUpToo

        Amen Ted! Ooops, I mean "right on brother"

        December 9, 2013 at 4:36 pm |
    • midwest rail

      " There is a heritage issue here. "
      Your statement has no legal "relevance".

      December 9, 2013 at 4:35 pm |
      • Vic

        It is totally benign!

        December 9, 2013 at 5:06 pm |
    • Al Russell

      OK, fine, so I get to decide what qualifies as Heritage then, right? Oh, YOU do? Hey! I pay taxes too so I should get to say what's allowed. Do those who pay more taxes, own more local real estate or who have more political clout get to rule over the others? That sounds kind of like a perversion of EVERYTHING this nation has always stood for. It's unpatriotic to suggest that "certain" Americans are more equal than others and that's what you are actually suggesting.

      December 9, 2013 at 4:42 pm |
      • Vic

        Not so!

        I clearly indicated in the root post that the desire many places in America that have to erect such monuments stems from the strong Christian heritage of America. That is representative of the people of those places on so many levels, and through their elected officials who represent them.

        December 9, 2013 at 5:13 pm |
    • Fedup

      Vic... your's is not the only heritage. Your's is not the only point of view. And you and the people that think like you are not the only ones paying taxes in your state. Your heritage does not belong on the steps of a courthouse if it's a religious heritage... It belongs in your church. Go put it there and save the rest of the population of your state the offense of having your heritage pushed to them. If you were really concerned about the heritage of Oklahoma you'd be trying to erect a tee-pee on the steps of the capitol building there.

      December 9, 2013 at 5:18 pm |
  7. Justice

    Are you sure this isn't just another ploy to get your story on the Belief Blog like the infamous athiest church photographer? The things people will do for attention!

    No offense CNN, but Mandela died and there's not one story about him. And, I can assure you he didn't do that for attention... just saying he deserves some.

    Thanks

    December 9, 2013 at 4:25 pm |
    • In Santa we trust

      Not one story on the belief blog – why would you expect that?
      This story pertains to belief and how it is used to skirt the laws of this country.

      December 9, 2013 at 4:28 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      "infamous athiest church photographer"

      Infamous?

      December 9, 2013 at 4:33 pm |
  8. tony

    Oh the Irony.

    December 9, 2013 at 4:24 pm |
  9. Max B

    Sure, why not. I think it'd be funny to then watch as people go ballistic and try to repeatedly egg or knock it down. Instant human comedy.

    December 9, 2013 at 4:23 pm |
    • Justice

      True, and probably the main reason Oklahoma won't allow it.

      December 9, 2013 at 4:27 pm |
      • Wolfaxe451

        They are going to be taken to court over it if they don't. Either they let the statue go up or they take the commandments down.

        December 10, 2013 at 2:22 am |
  10. Dave

    Good for them! I hope they get their statue.

    December 9, 2013 at 4:22 pm |
  11. I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

    This about sums this up:

    Oklahoma: The Texas wannabe.

    I guess they must think everything really is bigger in Texas.

    December 9, 2013 at 4:22 pm |
  12. haaa

    I'm a Presbyterian, and I find myself in complete agreement with the head of the Church of Satan. There should be no religious monuments whatsoever on Statehouse Property.

    December 9, 2013 at 4:21 pm |
    • cleareye1

      Bravo!

      December 9, 2013 at 4:24 pm |
  13. ooo

    interesting to see where this one goes...

    December 9, 2013 at 4:20 pm |
  14. cleareye1

    Fair enough. There should be as many statues and plaques, etc as any religion wants to pay for.

    December 9, 2013 at 4:19 pm |
  15. bag o chips

    "oh hi, nice to meet you...so what do you do?"

    "I'm the Events Co-ordinator for the Temple of Satan, and you?"

    December 9, 2013 at 4:18 pm |
    • Justice

      😀

      Response: RUNNNNNN!

      December 9, 2013 at 4:32 pm |
  16. Rick

    Just for a bit of clarification, there are two kinds of Satanists. Those that believe in an actual devil and those that believe that each human being is a creator.

    December 9, 2013 at 4:15 pm |
    • Honey Badger Don't Care

      Most xtians dont even understand their own religion, what makes you think that they would understand someone else's?

      December 9, 2013 at 4:17 pm |
      • cleareye1

        Very few Christians understand theirs.

        December 9, 2013 at 4:20 pm |
    • Christian

      And both lead to Heavens.... ? I prefer to be on a God's site... You?

      December 9, 2013 at 4:23 pm |
  17. Tiny Tina

    These Christians think, "Freedom means freedom for people like me, not people like YOU. Freedom for me to make monuments on government property to my superior religion, not freedom for you to erect monuments about whatever silly thing YOU believe."

    Those who do not understand the most basic tenets of our country should not be allowed to serve in our government.

    December 9, 2013 at 4:13 pm |
    • Can we make that a law?

      And what "test" do you think we could give?

      Don't get me wrong – I'm all for it.

      December 9, 2013 at 4:24 pm |
    • James Tarkin

      I agree that this is the case in some scenarios, but not all. There are plenty of Christians who would be perfectly fine with multiple religions having their monuments erected on public grounds as long as their freedoms are not imperiled. The only interesting argument in this case is that the state capitol must represent the ideals of Oklahomans. Good argument, considering that the people who want to provide the monument are from New York, not Oklahoma. Once they find a representative number of Satanists in Oklahoma (and there are some) they will probably have a better outcome. At that point, the Oklahoma legislature will probably change the requirements to be some specific number of the population requesting it in order to allow the statue. It would be similar to the way the military provides chaplains probably. They have Satanic and Wiccan and other faith-based chaplains, but their numbers are much smaller because their representation among military members is also small.

      December 9, 2013 at 4:33 pm |
  18. wildbillyboy

    I never understood why Christians cared about the Ten Commandments, they don't follow them anyways.
    "You shall have no other gods before me". Christians do have another God, they worship Jesus as part of the trinity. That is not following this commandment.
    "You shall not make for yourself a carved image, or any likeness of anything that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth. You shall not bow down to them or serve them"
    Churches are full of statues and graven images that people kneel down to.
    "Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days you shall labor, and do all your work, but the seventh day is a Sabbath to the LORD your God. " Christians work on the Sabbath, another contravention. It doesn't make sense why they cling to the Ten Commandments when they don't even follow them properly.

    December 9, 2013 at 4:13 pm |
    • pm ohio

      Because the Christians don't realize that the Ten Commandments is from the Old Testament and Jesus came to "show people a better way". #1, these people don't understand the 1st Amendment and separation of Church and State and #2, they don't even understand thier own religion and #3 religious freedom works both ways.

      December 9, 2013 at 4:19 pm |
      • PM Ohio - WRONG - Jesus said he came not to abolish the Law

        He actually even said that NOT ONE JOT OF THE LAW SHALL BE CHANGED.

        That is, until you Christians came along and threw all the Laws out the window except for the one about Gays...

        December 9, 2013 at 4:25 pm |
      • haaa

        Hi. I'm Christian and I understand all these things. Don't lump us all together. I am 100% for separation of church and state. I don't think any religious monuments should be located on any government property. And if these folks succeed in erecting their Statue of Satan next to the Ten commandments, then good for them. Sometimes you need a spectacle in order to make a point.

        December 9, 2013 at 4:29 pm |
    • cleareye1

      One Christian in 10,000 could name all ten.

      December 9, 2013 at 4:21 pm |
      • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

        Like Rep. Lynn Westmoreland (R, GA)

        http://www.colbertnation.com/the-colbert-report-videos/70809/june-14-2006/exclusive-georgia-s-8th

        December 9, 2013 at 4:31 pm |
    • Christian

      Billyboy – you said it yourself – trinity. If you read the Bible it said God is three – God, Jesus (when God took human's flesh to come to earth), and Holy Spirit.

      December 9, 2013 at 4:26 pm |
      • Jw

        Matt 3:17: "17 Look! Also, a voice from the heavens said: “This is my Son, the beloved, whom I have approved.”

        Of Jesus is God on flesh, how come God called Jesus his Son from heaven at the time of his baptism?

        December 9, 2013 at 4:41 pm |
        • HotAirAce

          Logical fallacy – appeal to alleged and unproven authority.

          December 9, 2013 at 4:44 pm |
    • Natrldiver

      Please educate yourself on biblical text with old and new testament. Throughout the new testament, God is referred to as the holy trinity (father, son and holy spirit). Do not point out the spec in your brother's eye when you clearly have a plank in your own.

      December 9, 2013 at 4:34 pm |
    • SuperHeeb

      the Ten Commandments, originally the Ten Words are not Christian originally anyway, they are from Judaism (one of the multiple books – the Old Testament)....Christians just took it because, well it's just good moral sense not to steal, etc

      December 9, 2013 at 4:34 pm |
    • Dandintac

      And the first ten commandments are not the only ones either. There were a whole bunch of others, many of which are ignored by most Christians today. Like wearing clothes made of two types of material, and eating pork or shellfish, or shaving, or associating with women who are menstruating. They are also supposed to take atheists to the edge of town and stone them. And if their own child goes to another religion, they are supposed to stone them also, and their hand should be the first raised against them.

      December 9, 2013 at 5:14 pm |
      • Craig

        I say this with respect. Yes, all of those laws, are indeed in the OT. But you need to remember who those laws were written for. They were written for God's chosen people, the Israelites. Before Christ came to earth as a human, the Israelites had many, many laws that they had to obey. Why? Because they had to live differently than anyone else. If they were going to live as God's chosen people, they had to follow His laws.
        I would imagine that because of those laws, back then, everyone would instantly know who you were. Were some laws silly? By today's standards, they sure seemed to be. But I don't think is was so much about the actual laws as much as it was about following God's word unconditionally. Regardless of how many laws or commandments there were for the Israelites, they were just that. For the Israelites. Jesus gave us two. Those are the two that all followers of Christ should be following. 1. love God. 2. Love people. Everything else that matters, falls under those two commandments. If anyone calls them self a Christian, yet isn't loving God or loving others by their actions,then they should be more concerned about their own actions than the actions of others.

        December 9, 2013 at 6:40 pm |
  19. Born again mike

    Could I still be saved, even if I continue to celebrate a pagan festivity repeatedly?

    December 9, 2013 at 4:11 pm |
    • igaftr

      Why not...all Christians celebrate Christmas and Easter...both stolen from the pagans originally.
      Celebrating pagan holidays is the christian thing to do...you just have to claim it is yours in the first place.

      December 9, 2013 at 4:50 pm |
      • Jw

        Jehovah witnesses are the only Christian that don't do that!

        December 9, 2013 at 5:04 pm |
        • igaftr

          Yes, but the jw's take on things is pretty non-celebratory anyway.
          You don't even celebrate birthdays...what is the joy in life if you don't celebrate from time to time.

          Are you saying the others aren't christians, or are you just pointing out why others consider JW's to be a strange fringe cult?

          December 9, 2013 at 5:12 pm |
        • JW

          We dont need one day to celebrate, we can exchange give gifts and pass a great time with family and friends all year long.
          What others say, i dont really care. what matters is that were trying to do Gods will, even if we become unpopular!
          Have you ever asked if the others that call us , cult, sect...Are practicing what is in the bible? Maybe you should investigate... You may get a big surprise!

          December 9, 2013 at 5:51 pm |
        • igaftr

          JW
          No one practices what is in the bible...that would be impossible considering the bible contradicts itself so often....just like all the others, your version cherry picks what to follow and what to ignore.

          December 10, 2013 at 8:04 am |
  20. MashaSobaka

    Religious folks are always demanding "religious liberty for all" until they realize that it actually applies to *everyone* and not just to them.

    December 9, 2013 at 4:10 pm |
    • Honey Badger Don't Care

      This receives the succinct statement of the day award!

      December 9, 2013 at 4:16 pm |
    • cleareye1

      Bravo\!

      December 9, 2013 at 4:22 pm |
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36
Advertisement
About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.