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Atheists plan conservative outreach with booth at CPAC
The Reason Rally, sponsored by American Atheists and other secular organizations, draws a crowd to the National Mall in March 2012.
February 25th, 2014
06:00 AM ET

Atheists plan conservative outreach with booth at CPAC

By Dan Merica, CNN

Washington (CNN) – American Atheists, an outspoken organization that advocates for atheists nationwide, will have a booth at the 2014 Conservative Political Action Conference.

The atheist institution, which is well known for its controversial billboards and media campaigns, informed CNN of its inclusion on Monday night, and a representative from CPAC confirmed that the group will have a booth at the annual national gathering of conservative leaders and activists in March. American Atheists hopes to use the forum to tap into the conservative movement and bring conservative atheists “out of the closet.”

“Just as there are many closeted atheists in the church pews, I am extremely confident that there are many closeted atheists in the ranks of conservatives," said David Silverman, president of American Atheists.

Silverman said coming to CPAC will be “the first step of many” in reaching out to Republicans.

[twitter-follow screen_name='danmericacnn'] [twitter-follow screen_name='CNNbelief']

“It is really a serious outreach effort, and I am very pleased to be embarking on it,” Silverman said.

The group’s inclusion is believed to be the first time that atheists have been involved in the conservative political gathering that has long been associated with Christian conservatives.

The Conservative Political Action Committee, the largest and oldest gathering of conservatives, is run by the American Conservative Union and will be held at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center in National Harbor in Maryland from March 6 to 8. Last year, the event brought together thousands of activists to listen to dozens of Republican leaders speak about everything from economics and foreign policy to social issues. The event has long been considered a required stop for Republican presidential hopefuls.

Meghan Snyder, spokeswoman for CPAC, said American Atheists were included in the confab because “conservatives have always stood for freedom of religion and freedom of expression.”

“The folks we have been working with stand for many of the same liberty-oriented policies and principles we stand for,” Snyder said in an e-mail to CNN.

Tony Perkins, president of the Christian conservative think-tank Family Research Council, doesn't see it that way. In an email to CNN, a rankled Perkins wrote that the atheist group does "not seek to add their voice to the chorus of freedom."

"CPAC's mission is to be an umbrella for conservative organizations that advance liberty, traditional values and our national defense," said Perkins, who spokes at CPAC in 2012. "Does the American Conservative Union really think the liberties and values they seek to preserve can be maintained when they partner with individuals and organizations that are undermining the understanding that our liberties come from God? Thomas Jefferson warned against such nonsense."

The social conservative leader added: "If this is where the ACU is headed, they will have to pack up and put away the 'C' in CPAC!"

In explaining why the group decided to join CPAC, Silverman cited a 2012 Pew Research study that found 20% of self-identified conservatives consider themselves religiously unaffiliated. While that does not mean they are atheists, Silverman believes learning more about atheism will make it more likely conservatives will choose to identify with those who believe there is no God.

“Conservative isn’t a synonym for religious,” Silverman said. “I am not worried about making the Christian right angry. The Christian right should be angry that we are going in to enlighten conservatives. The Christian right should be threatened by us.”

American Atheists paid $3,000 for booth 439 in the event’s exhibition hall. Their booth will be right next to the Republican National Committee's booth, according to the room map.

American Atheists is known as the in-your-face contingent in the world of atheist activists, and the group’s members pride themselves as being the “Marines" of the atheist movement.

The group has long targeted Republican lawmakers, although Silverman considers the organization nonpartisan.

In 2013, American Atheists launched a billboard campaign against three Republican politicians: former vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich and former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum. All three Republicans have spoken at CPAC in the past.

In one billboard, Santorum is pictured to the left of a quote attributed to him. “Our civil laws have to comport with a higher law. God’s law,” the quote reads. Underneath the graphic is a tagline: "GO GODLESS INSTEAD."

The group has also prided itself on trying to reach into religious communities and bring people out of the closet. In 2012, American Atheists asked Jews and Muslims to come out of the closet in a targeted billboard campaign.

In addition to Silverman, Amanda Knief, American Atheist’s managing director, and Dave Muscato, the group’s spokesman, will attend CPAC. Silverman said they will be prepared to respond to questions from conference attendees.

UPDATE: CPAC reversed their decision and will not allow American Atheists to have an exhibition booth at the conservative conference.

- Dan Merica

Filed under: Atheism • Politics

soundoff (729 Responses)
  1. Dalahäst

    " A more beautiful or precious morsel of ethics I have never seen; it is a doc.ument in proof that I am a real Christian; that is to say, a disciple of the doctrines of Jesus.

    Of all the systems of morality, ancient or modern, which have come under my observation, none appear to me so pure as that of Jesus.

    The doctrines which flowed from the lips of Jesus himself are within the comprehension of a child; but thousands of volumes have not yet explained the Platonisms engrafted on them.

    Had the doctrines of Jesus been preached always as pure as they came from his lips, the whole civilized world would now have been Christians.

    I have always said, I always will say, that the studious perusal of the sacred volume will make better citizens, better fathers, and better husbands.

    1. The doctrines of Jesus are simple and tend to the happiness of man.
    2. There is only one God, and He is all perfect.
    3. There is a future state of rewards and punishment.
    4. To love God with all the heart and thy neighbor as thyself is the sum of all. These are the great points on which to reform the religion of the Jews.

    No one sees with greater pleasure than myself the progress of reason in its advance toward rational Christianity, and my opinion is that if nothing had ever been added to what flowed from His lips, the whole world would at this day been Christian...Had there never been a commentator there never would have been an infidel. I have little doubt that the whole country will soon be rallied to the unity of our Creator, and, I hope, to the pure doctrines of Jesus also."

    Thomas Jefferson

    February 25, 2014 at 1:31 pm |
    • SeaVik

      "I am an atheist and decry Christianity."

      Thomas Jefferson

      Perhaps you could provide a bit more of a reference so I can figure out why you posted something that conflicts with everything I've read about Jefferson?

      February 25, 2014 at 1:40 pm |
      • captainaj121

        I encourage you to go read his Notes on Virginia, and his letters to the Baptist Seminary in Danbury, CT. He was a non-Christian, and further reading will go to show that the Federalists of the time railed against him for it.

        February 25, 2014 at 1:47 pm |
      • Dalahäst

        I can't find any reference of TJ saying: "I am an atheist and decry Christianity."

        Where did you get that?

        The quote I used is from this:

        http://www.monticello.org/site/research-and-collections/jeffersons-religious-beliefs

        February 25, 2014 at 1:51 pm |
      • Dalahäst

        "I am an atheist and decry Christianity."

        Did you read that on an American Atheist's billboard?

        February 25, 2014 at 1:56 pm |
        • SeaVik

          Sorry Dala, I thought it was clear that I was joking with that fake quote. I was just asking for a better reference so I could confirm your quote and read the context.

          February 25, 2014 at 2:01 pm |
        • Dalahäst

          OK, I get it now.

          February 25, 2014 at 2:03 pm |
    • joey3467

      That would be enough to get him tarred and feathered by today's right wing crazies. Do you think that a Tea Party Republican would vote for someone who doesn't really think that Jesus was divine?

      February 25, 2014 at 1:40 pm |
      • Dalahäst

        The tea party would probably hate him. And some atheists wouldn't like him looking at the virtues of Jesus.

        February 25, 2014 at 1:53 pm |
        • joey3467

          Every single atheist I know would say that Jesus had some good ideas on how to treat one another, but that to believe he was the son of god is silly. Which is basically what Jefferson believed.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:55 pm |
        • SeaVik

          Sure, there are some positive moral messages in the bible. Whether or not those actually came from a person named Jesus Christ, none of us know. There are also many horrific, highly immoral teachings from the bible.

          The fact that someone might agree with some of the principles in the bible says nothing about them being Christian.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:59 pm |
        • Blessed are the Cheesemakers

          I don't think most anyone has a problem taking some of the positive "love your neighbor" stuff from Jesus within reason. It is when supernatural mumbo jumbo is attached to it that it becomes awful. And the writings of Jefferson would seem to support that he shared this conclusion.

          1. The doctrines of Jesus are simple and tend to the happiness of man.

          If they are so simple how come so many of its proponents disaggree among themselves?

          2. There is only one God, and He is all perfect.

          Rejected for lack of evidence.

          3. There is a future state of rewards and punishment.

          Rejected for lack of evidence and on moral grounds for being repugnant

          4. To love God with all the heart and thy neighbor as thyself is the sum of all.

          Feeling love is not a choice, love is far too complicated to be dealt with in so simplistically.

          February 25, 2014 at 2:31 pm |
    • Austin

      Bad and freaky.

      February 25, 2014 at 1:41 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      Do you know why Jefferson was trying so hard to defend himself "as a Christian" here in it's proper context?

      I won't argue that he didn't believe in God, but he was not "a Christian" as that word is understood either today or in the 18th century.

      February 25, 2014 at 1:42 pm |
      • Dalahäst

        I think he was saying the religious leaders were corrupt. They weren't really practicing Christianity.

        February 25, 2014 at 1:54 pm |
      • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

        Note the reference from the web page you listed:

        "Jefferson's religious views became a major public issue during the bitter party conflict between Federalists and Republicans in the late 1790s when Jefferson was often accused of being an atheist."

        Note that Jefferson was elected in 1800. He had a lot of reason to disprove accusations that he was an atheist. Hence statements like "I am a real Christian" coming from a politician, even after his presidency.

        February 25, 2014 at 2:05 pm |
      • Dalahäst

        And he accused others of following demoralizing dogmas, not God.

        He wasn't an atheist. He believed in God.

        February 25, 2014 at 2:10 pm |
        • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

          I never said he was an atheist.

          He was accused of being one in the 1790s because his beliefs were very non-conformist, even what many would consider heretical. His beliefs did not conform to those of Christians of the 18th century and they do not conform to the beliefs of Christians in the 21st century.

          Apparently, like today, American politicians couldn't get elected in the 1790s if people thought they were atheists.

          February 25, 2014 at 2:31 pm |
    • Dyslexic doG

      Thanks TJ but unfortunately no-one knows the "doctrines which flowed from the lips of Jesus himself ", because nothing of what JC said was recorded, it was written down second hand, third hand, four hundred and fifty third hand. It was written down hundreds of years later. No-one on earth has any idea of what jesus may or may not have said. No-one!

      February 25, 2014 at 1:43 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      "I am of a sect by myself, as far as I know." – Thomas Jefferson, June 25, 1819, letter to Ezra Stiles Ely.

      February 25, 2014 at 1:46 pm |
    • SeaVik

      From the same book Dala quotes:

      Jefferson also denied the existence of an afterlife, maintaining that death was nothingness….Jefferson also rejected the view that Jesus had held any pretensions to supernatural powers.

      Clearly, his version of Christianity was nothing like what we mean when we say Christianity.

      February 25, 2014 at 1:49 pm |
      • Dalahäst

        "1. The doctrines of Jesus are simple and tend to the happiness of man.
        2. There is only one God, and He is all perfect.
        3. There is a future state of rewards and punishment.
        4. To love God with all the heart and thy neighbor as thyself is the sum of all. These are the great points on which to reform the religion of the Jews."

        He also said all men were created equal, but owned slaves, so he had some serious flaws.

        February 25, 2014 at 2:00 pm |
        • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

          Your enumerated list is nowhere I can find on the page you referenced.

          What is your source?

          February 25, 2014 at 2:11 pm |
        • Dalahäst

          http://www.let.rug.nl/usa/presidents/thomas-jefferson/letters-of-thomas-jefferson/jefl268.php

          February 25, 2014 at 2:13 pm |
        • neverbeenhappieratheist

          "1. The doctrines of Care-a-Lot are simple and tend to the happiness of man and bear.
          2. There is only one Love-a-Lot Bear, and He is all lovey.
          3. There is a future state of rewards and punishment in cloudy Care-a-Lot.
          4. To love Tenderheart Bear with all your heart and your neighbor bear as thyself is the sum of all. These are the great points on which to reform the rules of the heart.
          5. The Care Bears' ultimate weapon is the "Care Bear Stare" (a.k.a. "Belly Magic"), in which the collected Bears stand together and radiate light from their respective tummy symbols. These combine to form a ray of love and good cheer which could bring care and joy into the target's heart.

          February 25, 2014 at 2:29 pm |
        • Dalahäst

          "In the beginning there was nothing. Which exploded. And then neverbeenhappieratheist made a fallacious analogy about Care Bears and God."

          February 25, 2014 at 3:26 pm |
        • neverbeenhappieratheist

          Hey, both of our theories have exactly the same evidence supporting them. I have a book that tells me all about Care-a-lot. I watched a video with my daughter and it showed pictures of how cloudy and puffy Care-a-lot is and looks like a wonderful place to go after death. So please prove Care-a-Lot does not exist, unless you want me to provide empirical evidence to prove it exists since i'm the one making the claim, but then you know i'd ask you for the same, so...

          February 25, 2014 at 6:34 pm |
        • Dalahäst

          I'm familiar with this argument technique. I know you honestly don't believe in Care Bears. If you actually do, that is your problem, not mine.

          February 25, 2014 at 6:49 pm |
        • neverbeenhappieratheist

          "I know you honestly don't believe in Care Bears. If you actually do, that is your problem, not mine."

          Well that is the problem isn't it. If I believed in Care-a-Lot it wouldn't be your problem, but many Christians belief in an invisible puffy cloudy place of their own is my problem. Why is it my problem? Only because they think it is their right to attempt to pass laws based on their invisible puffy cloudy places landlord and what they have determined their ethereal Mr. Roper in the sky wants me to do or not to do. They pass laws against selling alcohol on Sundays in much of the South. They inserted their God into my nations pledge and put it on my money. I guess you wouldn't care if it said "In Tenderheart We Trust" on our money would you? The entire country is steeped in religion and drips of Christianity and it's disgusting and you and your ilk don't seem to notice. It's like you are completely oblivious which is why I tried to point out the silliness of your premise postulated without proof.

          February 25, 2014 at 7:23 pm |
        • Dalahäst

          Our nation was mostly founded by Christians, so basically you are experiencing what it is like to have a minority voice. Be glad that our nation gives you a voice. Some nations kill people like you. And also kill people like me. There are some things I don't like about our country and government, too. But I don't feel the need to make up imaginary things or blame you for those ills. We are attempting to make a "more perfect nation." And so far we seem to be improving. I fight for the rights of people like you, some of which I learn about the importance of doing so through Christ's teachings.

          February 25, 2014 at 7:40 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      @Dala,

      what is your source for this quote? The enumerated list is very unlike Thomas Jefferson’s writing and It does not look the same as the one that I am familiar with regarding Jefferson's cut and paste version of the bible:

      "I too have made a wee little book, from the same materials, which I call the Philosophy of Jesus. it is a paradigma of his doctrines, made by cutting the texts out of the book, and arranging them on the pages of a blank book, in a certain order of time or subject. a more beautiful or precious morsel of ethics I have never seen. it is a docu.ment in proof that I am a real Christian, that is to say, a disciple of the doctrines of Jesus, very different from the Platonists, who call me infidel, and themselves Christians and preachers of the gospel, while they draw all their characteristic dogmas from what it’s Author never said nor saw. they have compounded from the heathen mysteries a system beyond the comprehension of man, of which the great reformer of the vicious ethics and deism of the Jews, were he to return on earth, would not recognise one feature. if I had time I would add to my little book the Greek, Latin and French texts, in columns side by side, and I wish I could subjoin a translation of Gassendi’s Syntagma of the doctrines of Epicurus, which, notwithstanding the calumnies of the Stoics, and caricatures of Cicero, is the most rational system remaining of the philosophy of the ancients, as frugal of vicious indulgence, and fruitful of virtue as the hyperbolical extrava.gancies of his rival sects. 1816 January 9. (Jefferson to Charles Thomson).

      See: http://www.monticello.org/site/research-and-collections/jeffersons-religious-beliefs

      February 25, 2014 at 2:00 pm |
      • Dalahäst

        http://www.let.rug.nl/usa/presidents/thomas-jefferson/letters-of-thomas-jefferson/jefl268.php

        February 25, 2014 at 2:07 pm |
      • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

        Thank you for the reference, and the good Arts students at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands are a curious choice of source.

        In any case you have manufactured your "quote" in your OP by combining sources from multiple places and representing them as a whole. This is bad scholarly form when you don't know the context of each piece of correspondence.

        You also left out the important next part:

        "Now, which of these is the true and charitable Christian? He who believes and acts on the simple doctrines of Jesus? Or the impious dogmatists, as Athanasius and Calvin? Verily I say these are the false shepherds foretold as to enter not by the door into the sheepfold, but to climb up some other way. They are mere usurpers of the Christian name, teaching a counter-religion made up of the deliria of crazy imaginations, as foreign from Christianity as is that of Mahomet. Their blasphemies have driven thinking men into infidelity, who have too hastily rejected the supposed author himself, with the horrors so falsely imputed to him.

        It is actually part of a diatribe against organized religion.

        The rest of the letter is where the Unitarian quote actually comes from. A bit disingenuous on your part I would say.

        February 25, 2014 at 2:22 pm |
        • Dalahäst

          My apologies, I referenced a bad source.

          I was posting in reference to someone who told me Jefferson hated Christianity and would be an atheist today.

          http://www.let.rug.nl/usa/presidents/thomas-jefferson/letters-of-thomas-jefferson/jefl268.php

          That demonstrates he probably wouldn't.

          February 25, 2014 at 2:38 pm |
        • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

          My guess is that Jefferson would object to organized religion in the 21st century as much as he did in the 18th and 19th centuries.

          He didn't like either the beliefs or the pastors/priests of mainstream Protestants or Catholics. The fact that believers simply cannot agree on their one true belief is an essential part of Jefferson's thinking that religion has no place in government. I am sure he would still agree with that.

          February 25, 2014 at 2:45 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      TO DOCTOR BENJAMIN WATERHOUSE
      Monticello, June 26, 1822
      Dear Sir,

      —I have received and read with thankfulness and pleasure your denunciation of the abuses of tobacco and wine. Yet, however sound in its principles, I expect it will be but a sermon to the wind. You will find it as difficult to inculcate these sanative precepts on the sensualities of the present day, as to convince an Athanasian that there is but one God. I wish success to both attempts, and am happy to learn from you that the latter, at least, is making progress, and the more rapidly in proportion as our Platonizing Christians make more stir and noise about it. The doctrines of Jesus are simple, and tend all to the happiness of man.

      1. That there is one only God, and he all perfect.

      2. That there is a future state of rewards and punishments.

      3. That to love God with all thy heart and thy neighbor as thyself, is the sum of religion. These are the great points on which he endeavored to reform the religion of the Jews. But compare with these the demoralizing dogmas of Calvin.

      1. That there are three Gods.

      2. That good works, or the love of our neighbor, are nothing.

      3. That faith is every thing, and the more incomprehensible the proposition, the more merit in its faith.

      4. That reason in religion is of unlawful use.

      5. That God, from the beginning, elected certain individuals to be saved, and certain others to be damned; and that no crimes of the former can damn them; no virtues of the latter save.

      Now, which of these is the true and charitable Christian? He who believes and acts on the simple doctrines of Jesus? Or the impious dogmatists, as Athanasius and Calvin? Verily I say these are the false shepherds foretold as to enter not by the door into the sheepfold, but to climb up some other way. They are mere usurpers of the Christian name, teaching a counter-religion made up of the deliria of crazy imaginations, as foreign from Christianity as is that of Mahomet. Their blasphemies have driven thinking men into infidelity, who have too hastily rejected the supposed author himself, with the horrors so falsely imputed to him. Had the doctrines of Jesus been preached always as pure as they came from his lips, the whole civilized world would now have been Christian. I rejoice that in this blessed country of free inquiry and belief, which has surrendered its creed and conscience to neither kings nor priests, the genuine doctrine of one only God is reviving, and I trust that there is not a young man now living in the United States who will not die an Unitarian.

      But much I fear, that when this great truth shall be re-established, its votaries will fall into the fatal error of fabricating formulas of creed and confessions of faith, the engines which so soon destroyed the religion of Jesus, and made of Christendom a mere Aceldama; that they will give up morals for mysteries, and Jesus for Plato. How much wiser are the Quakers, who, agreeing in the fundamental doctrines of the gospel, schismatize about no mysteries, and, keeping within the pale of common sense, suffer no speculative differences of opinion, any more than of feature, to impair the love of their brethren. Be this the wisdom of Unitarians, this the holy mantle which shall cover within its charitable circu.mference all who believe in one God, and who love their neighbor! I conclude my sermon with sincere assurances of my friendly esteem and respect.

      February 25, 2014 at 2:36 pm |
      • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

        Note the style of this letter. Not everything in it is a statement of Jefferson's beliefs.

        There is a premise, a contrast, an argument and a conclusion.

        Here Jefferson rails against Catholic/Orthodox (Athanasius) and Calvinistic doctrine and ultimately prefers Unitarianism.

        No love lost for evangelical protestantism there.

        February 25, 2014 at 2:39 pm |
      • Blessed are the Cheesemakers

        Well that reads a bit differently doesn't it...?

        February 25, 2014 at 2:43 pm |
      • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

        Yes, it does.

        February 25, 2014 at 2:48 pm |
        • Blessed are the Cheesemakers

          It looks like someone cobbled together some disparate quotes so as to make Jefferson appear to be taking a particular position that he wasn't really taking....why would someone do such a thing....(sarcasm...my second favorite "asm").

          David Barton anyone?

          February 25, 2014 at 2:57 pm |
        • Dalahäst

          I know some athe-ism websites that do the same thing.

          Nice to see non-believers can be David Barton's, too.

          http://atheistempire.com/greatminds/quotes.php?author=2

          http://www.celebatheists.com/wiki/Thomas_Jefferson

          Oh, yea, when they do it they are being "logical".

          Jefferson considered himself a deist; he also considered himself a follower of Jesus. This is not a contradiction, in Jefferson's view, because he believed Jesus to be merely human, not divine, and believed the precepts Jesus taught to be deistical. Much of traditional Christianity, Jefferson claimed, was error and corruption added by later followers of Jesus.

          Jefferson was a strong supporter of the separation of church and state, believing that both government and religion would be strengthened by keeping each free of the corrupting influence of the other.

          http://www.adherents.com/people/pj/Thomas_Jefferson.html

          February 25, 2014 at 3:08 pm |
        • Blessed are the Cheesemakers

          Wow, atheists can be dishonest too....no kidding....ya don't say.

          Another...."BUT YOU GUYS DO IT TOO" post from Dala.

          Some day you will understand the importance of trying to be honest...and stop justifying dishonesty. Just admit you were wrong and leave it at that.

          February 25, 2014 at 3:15 pm |
        • Dalahäst

          So, I do the same thing you do? Except you imagine you are rational, I am delusional.

          February 25, 2014 at 3:17 pm |
      • Dalahäst

        Yep. I know other Christians like him.

        February 25, 2014 at 2:55 pm |
  2. bringbackwayne

    Atheists are "spoils" of the devil, being used as pawns to bring more into unbelief. The weak minded are their victims. Stay alert, my fellow believers, satan is among us.

    February 25, 2014 at 1:24 pm |
    • Dyslexic doG

      yes we know it's still you posting with a different name ...

      February 25, 2014 at 1:27 pm |
      • Salero21

        WordPress says you're the cheesemaker! 😉 😀

        February 25, 2014 at 1:32 pm |
        • Blessed are the Cheesemakers

          No it doesn't...

          You are as nutty as a fruitcake.

          February 25, 2014 at 2:38 pm |
    • averagejoe7six

      'Weak-minded' is one that doubts with good reason, and doesn't have the guts to dig deeper.

      February 25, 2014 at 1:30 pm |
    • Lucifer's Evil Twin

      It is scarey that dumbasses like you exist and are allowed to breed... the human race is doomed.

      February 25, 2014 at 1:31 pm |
    • WhatsamattaU

      I'm afraid you have it backwards, it's the weak-minded that are the fertile ground into which religion, the biological equivalent of a computer virus, flourishes. Still, these folks opening a booth at such a convention reminds me of the old adage about relieving yourself into the wind....

      February 25, 2014 at 1:39 pm |
    • captainaj121

      I'm sure the voices in your head when you talk to yourself (read: pray) told you that too. They have medications for that.

      February 25, 2014 at 1:48 pm |
    • igaftr

      "satan is among us."

      If he is, he wrote your bible.

      February 25, 2014 at 2:40 pm |
  3. thefinisher1

    If we are all born atheists, doesn't that mean atheists are responsible for all the evil done in the world? Doesn't that make atheism not religion the source of all the wars and deaths? YEP!😜😀😃😊😄😜

    February 25, 2014 at 1:24 pm |
    • averagejoe7six

      Does 2 + 2 = 22 where you're from?

      February 25, 2014 at 1:27 pm |
      • thefinisher1

        Yes. Just add 10 silly.😜😜😜😜😜

        February 25, 2014 at 1:38 pm |
        • QuestionsEverything

          Wow, you're just as bad at math as you are at using logic. 2+2+10 =/= 22, it equals 14.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:51 pm |
    • SeaVik

      All evil, all good, all everything. However, most of the evil is done by atheists who have been converted to religion.

      February 25, 2014 at 1:28 pm |
      • thefinisher1

        Stalin was an atheist who ordered his men to kill the people of his own country. He purged many churches killing over 100,000 children and women. He was one of the most cruelest and murderous atheist to ever exist. He starved millions as well. Atheism is indeed the source of all the evil, pain, and suffering.

        February 25, 2014 at 1:36 pm |
        • lewcypher

          Stalin didn't purge his people because he was an atheist, he did it because he was a paranoid megalomaniac.

          Know the difference

          Research is your friend

          February 25, 2014 at 1:44 pm |
        • WhatsamattaU

          Amazingly poor logic. Stalin was indeed a bad guy, on a par with Hitler and some others. The fact that he was an atheist does not explain his brutal regime. How many millions have been killed throughout history in the name of religion or one group or another's favored deity? To blame all atheists for all evil is completely unfounded, just as blaming religion would be.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:44 pm |
        • captainaj121

          Stalin was an Orthodox Christian who had spent time in Seminary. Get your facts straight, son.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:49 pm |
    • WhatsamattaU

      What bizzarre logic. Does the fact that we're all born with hearts mean that being born with hearts CAUSES ALL HEART ATTACKS?

      February 25, 2014 at 1:41 pm |
      • commonsensed01

        Well, in reality, I believe having a heart is required for having a heart attack, so, having a heart is at least part of the root cause of heart attacks.

        February 25, 2014 at 2:32 pm |
  4. Austin

    Rejection of the savior is a sin. Everyone is a sinner.

    February 25, 2014 at 1:19 pm |
    • Dyslexic doG

      abused spouse syndrome again ...

      February 25, 2014 at 1:22 pm |
      • Austin

        Guilty spouse reality.

        February 25, 2014 at 1:25 pm |
    • Austin

      Christians who sin reject Him and sin against the indwelling spirit.

      He truly is our savior. He is faithful to complete His work in us.

      February 25, 2014 at 1:23 pm |
      • Dyslexic doG

        is this your first time with English?

        February 25, 2014 at 1:28 pm |
    • waynegage

      I take exception to you claiming I am a sinner...I am not. You've been fed a load of scat.

      February 25, 2014 at 1:31 pm |
    • lewcypher

      Your "savior"............. rented some flesh, played human for a while then had the flesh killed off and returned from where it came.

      Yeah, some sacrifice.

      February 25, 2014 at 1:47 pm |
    • myweightinwords

      Austin, you have been sold a sad untruth and you have taken it inside yourself and let yourself be deceived.

      You are not a sinner. You do not need saving. You need to find love, true, unconditional love...for yourself first, for your fellow man. It is the only real freedom.

      February 25, 2014 at 2:49 pm |
  5. Dyslexic doG

    A question for christians. Just the sane ones answer please, not the loons.

    when god made the universe and/or the earth and/or all the things on the earth ... Was it a thought by god and magically everything existed? Was it spells and cauldrons and incantations and chanting? Did god actually take the elements of the universe and get hands on – molding each creature and each landform into the right shape with his hands?

    Does anyone know how it was supposedly done? If so, how do they know? If not, then how do you know it happened?

    Are you just saying "god did it" because the human race hasn't figured it out yet? The way man used to say thunder was thor fighting with ice giants in asgard? the way man used to say that sickness was being possessed by demons or punishment from god? A god of the gaps sort of thing?

    anyway ... any thoughtful answers would be appreciated. And remember, retreat into mysticism is the first refuge of the cornered fool so try facts if there are any.

    February 25, 2014 at 1:18 pm |
    • Austin

      I have experienced sovereign revelation. It wasnt direct revelatuon. But how does God know what will happen 6 years from now and then bring about every detail.?

      His mind is so powerful that no one can understand the reality of His Godness.

      He is absolutely and totally awesome. We will lift up his name and sing forever. Check your flesh at the door yall! We arte going to celebrate extatically. He is risen!

      February 25, 2014 at 1:32 pm |
      • Athy

        Wow! That borders on insanity!

        February 25, 2014 at 1:41 pm |
      • captainaj121

        So you hear voices in your head.

        They have medication and therapy for that.

        February 25, 2014 at 1:50 pm |
      • Blessed are the Cheesemakers

        I don't believe you.

        February 25, 2014 at 1:53 pm |
      • lewcypher

        You are describing the indescribable which is patently dishonest.

        You might garner some respect if you would simply say, "I don't know"

        February 25, 2014 at 1:54 pm |
      • Athy

        ..and spell "ecstatically" correctly.

        February 25, 2014 at 2:47 pm |
  6. bigbendjc

    Boy, there's going to be a major ruckus in the GOP all inclusive tent! As an independent i"m going sit and enjoy the show!

    February 25, 2014 at 1:13 pm |
  7. HenryMiller

    Perhaps the most offensive thing about the modern GOP is its determination to turn the tenets of their religion into law—I just wish they'd understand that trying to use religion to dictate peoples' behaviour is as wrong as dictating their behaviour in matters of their own health care arrangements. An attack on individual freedom is just as much an attack regardless of whether the motive is religious or "Progressive."

    February 25, 2014 at 1:10 pm |
  8. gent49

    Athiests brought us the Soviet Union and the cold war, China and it's satalites North Korea and Vietnam, which were the causes for the Korean War and the Viet Nam War. Athiests are worthless and evil.

    February 25, 2014 at 1:02 pm |
    • Akira

      Sure they did. Power mad dictators had nothing to so with it. Atheists banded together en masse and tried to take over the world.

      Sure they did.

      February 25, 2014 at 1:04 pm |
      • Austin

        Trust in Christ for redemption. Let the world run its course. Jesus put the romans ear back on.

        February 25, 2014 at 1:15 pm |
        • Dyslexic doG

          cult speak.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:19 pm |
        • Akira

          ???
          How is this a response to my post?

          February 25, 2014 at 1:21 pm |
    • Dyslexic doG

      uh oh, our local troll is flipping names again ...

      February 25, 2014 at 1:05 pm |
    • joey3467

      North Koreans are supposed to worship their Supreme Leader as a god, and are therefore not atheists.

      February 25, 2014 at 1:07 pm |
      • thefinisher1

        Most of them are atheists as they are forced to believe he is a god. Humans aren't gods and only in atheism, you are your own god.

        February 25, 2014 at 1:11 pm |
        • Doris

          Asinine

          February 25, 2014 at 1:13 pm |
        • Akira

          Do you have any clue as to what the word atheist means?
          If they believe he is a god, they're not atheists.

          Good gracious.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:15 pm |
        • thefinisher1

          Wrong. They're still atheists.😜😀😃😊😀😜😊😃😊😀

          February 25, 2014 at 1:17 pm |
        • Akira

          No. They're not. Just as those who believe in Allah are not atheists.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:20 pm |
        • SeaVik

          Finisher, you reject the teachings of the dictionary in the same way that atheists reject the teachings of the bible. Ironic.

          If North Koreans believe their leader is a god, they're not atheists. At least for those of us who follow the teachings of the dictionary.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:22 pm |
        • thefinisher1

          They are all brainwashed atheists brainwashed by an atheist country. Seems legit.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:22 pm |
        • joey3467

          It is a good thing all Christians aren't this stupid. If you think of yourself as a god then you aren't an atheist. If you believe the leader of a country is a god then you are religious.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:23 pm |
        • Akira

          Seems legit to people who do not know what the word atheist means, I'll agree.

          For the rest of us with an IQ above room temperature, not so much.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:36 pm |
        • neverbeenhappieratheist

          "they are forced to believe he is a god"

          Forced to believe? Could any of you supposed Christians be "forced to believe" there is no God? I could see how someone might be reasoned with to see that there is no evidence of God, but "forced"? Not likely.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:45 pm |
    • Blessed are the Cheesemakers

      People wearing hats brought us the Soviet Union and the cold war, China and it's satalites North Korea and Vietnam, which were the causes for the Korean War and the Viet Nam War. Hats are worthless and evil.

      February 25, 2014 at 1:18 pm |
    • SeaVik

      Since we are all born atheists, you could argue that atheists have brought everything good and evil that has ever happened in the world. Then again, most of the evil stuff was done by atheists who had been converted to religion.

      February 25, 2014 at 1:20 pm |
    • captainaj121

      Okay, and deeply religious Christians led the massacres that were The Crusades?

      February 25, 2014 at 1:52 pm |
  9. Salero21

    HAHAHA 😀 😀 😀 A mountain range of Evidence bigger than the Himalayas, that atheism is indeed Total stupidity and a Cult like set of stupid presumptions.

    For those americans who like Sarah Palin are totally clueless about the rest of the world, the Himalayas is the tallest mountain range in the world and is located mostly, between China and India.

    February 25, 2014 at 1:02 pm |
    • Dyslexic doG

      uh oh, our local troll is flipping names again ...

      February 25, 2014 at 1:05 pm |
      • Salero21

        😀 😀 dixlecic troll can't disprove refute what I said, again!! 😀 😀 I'll be one bitcoin he/she can't locate his street in a map of the city, her/his city in a map of the State, her/his State in a map of the Country or the Country in the World Atlas. 😀 😀 😀

        February 25, 2014 at 1:10 pm |
        • Dyslexic doG

          time for your meds

          February 25, 2014 at 1:24 pm |
    • Salero21

      In the Continent of Asia. 😉 which is west across the Pacific Ocean. You know the Pacific Ocean, the one on the west coast. Where the States of California, Oregon and Washington are. 😉

      All of it was Created by God the Creator.

      February 25, 2014 at 1:06 pm |
      • Dyslexic doG

        but voldemort and the easter bunny helped. it was magic you see. 🙂

        February 25, 2014 at 1:07 pm |
        • Salero21

          HAHAHA More Evidence of the Total stupidity keeps on piling by the truckloads. See... what you believe to be "magic" is the mere manipulations of created things/matter/elements. God however Created EX NIHILO that's Latin for out-of-nothing. Of course the Total stupidity of your Cult like system of presumptions disallows you from that understanding.

          As an atheists your extreme hypocrisy, dishonesty, compulsive and pathological lying disqualified you for a place among reasonable men or men of reason.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:18 pm |
    • Blessed are the Cheesemakers

      Mark my words if and when these preachers get control of the (republican) party, and they're sure trying to do so, it's going to be a terrible damn problem. Frankly these people frighten me. Politics and governing demand compromise. But these Christians Believe they are acting in the name of god, so they can't and won't compromise. I know, I've tried to deal with them.

      ~Republican Barry Goldwater

      February 25, 2014 at 1:13 pm |
      • Salero21

        Well... you as atheists who is extremely hypocritical, dishonest and a compulsive, pathological liar. Have made a fundamental mistake in quoting from a man who by his own very Public admission, was an SOB. 😉 🙂

        February 25, 2014 at 1:22 pm |
        • Blessed are the Cheesemakers

          That does nothing to refute his point.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:29 pm |
        • Salero21

          Neither refutes any of mine but places you once again among the critically dishonest. If you believe anything and everything of what politicians say then I can sell you a bridge in Brooklyn. Which again will make a fool of you, since you already bought a whole set of worthless presumptions from the devil in exchange for your more valuable Soul. 😉

          February 25, 2014 at 1:41 pm |
        • igaftr

          "since you already bought a whole set of worthless presumptions from the devil in exchange for your more valuable Soul."

          Which in itself is wildly presumptive.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:54 pm |
        • Blessed are the Cheesemakers

          And with your rant of a zealot...you prove his point.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:55 pm |
    • captainaj121

      No, not really. In fact there is no realistic evidence that your "holy" books have any basis in reality.

      February 25, 2014 at 1:53 pm |
    • commonsensed01

      Actually the highest mountain chain in the world are the Hawaiian Islands. Thanks for playing. Got any thing relevant to add?

      February 25, 2014 at 2:46 pm |
  10. Austin

    Thank God the revelation is written down for us.

    Do you see how peiple avoid the scripture and point at apostates and declare the gods of deceptions as all powerful realities.

    How dishonest can you possibly become?

    February 25, 2014 at 1:01 pm |
    • Dyslexic doG

      cult speak

      February 25, 2014 at 1:02 pm |
      • thefinisher1

        Asinine.

        February 25, 2014 at 1:03 pm |
      • Salero21

        Dyslexic troll said!

        February 25, 2014 at 1:27 pm |
    • Austin

      Avoiding what is written and putting people on a pedistool.

      Defamation of God reveals character . It is written.

      Apostates are not the manifestation of who God is. Dont trick youself with Satans candy.

      February 25, 2014 at 1:06 pm |
      • Doris

        "what is written and putting people on a pedistool. "

        You can leave your pedistool between you and your foot doctor – I don't need to hear about it.

        February 25, 2014 at 1:16 pm |
        • Akira

          Yeah, that kind of imagery I can do without...

          February 25, 2014 at 1:24 pm |
        • Salero21

          Hey guys look!! Take a look, here is Sharkira the booty shaker from Venezuela!!

          February 25, 2014 at 1:29 pm |
      • Lucifer's Evil Twin

        "Satan's Candy" LOL – what a boob

        February 25, 2014 at 1:25 pm |
        • Doris

          LOL – oh I missed that – LOL. I never made it past pedistool....

          February 25, 2014 at 1:33 pm |
    • captainaj121

      Written down? Without any verification? Or chain of custody? In dead languages that cannot be directly translated to modern English? Come'off it mate.

      February 25, 2014 at 1:54 pm |
    • commonsensed01

      Asinine.

      February 25, 2014 at 2:47 pm |
  11. Dyslexic doG

    there is no god.

    all the rest that we argue about on this blog is just noise.

    the noise enables christians to duck and weave and dodge and obfuscate and lie and pout and whine and threaten and flee

    when all we need to know is that there is NO evidence for any god. not one iota. never has been, never will be. zero. nada. nothing!

    all the rest of the arguing about the stories in the christian fairy tale book is just noise.

    February 25, 2014 at 12:58 pm |
    • thefinisher1

      "There is no God".

      Made a claim.

      Did not back it up.

      Excepts people to stop believing by using insults.

      Calls other people delusion.

      Is delusional.

      February 25, 2014 at 12:59 pm |
    • Dyslexic doG

      and now thefinished1 will write "asinine" or rewrite what I wrote to mirror the message. Go on little fella, you can do it ...

      February 25, 2014 at 1:00 pm |
      • Dyslexic doG

        ah, he beat me to it. 🙂

        February 25, 2014 at 1:00 pm |
    • averagejoe7six

      You're right. It's absolute noise, and it seems that humans love playing evil games with each other's hearts and minds. Taking advantage and driving people crazy for money. No other animals screws each other over like the human. Gotta love 'em!

      February 25, 2014 at 1:25 pm |
  12. thefinisher1

    This proves atheism is a cult.

    February 25, 2014 at 12:31 pm |
    • hotairace

      How?

      February 25, 2014 at 12:32 pm |
      • Lucifer's Evil Twin

        Don't expect a coherent response from this troll...

        February 25, 2014 at 12:35 pm |
        • hotairace

          I don't. And I know one shouldn't "feed the trolls" but I think their non-response can speak volumes, even to the delusionals. Of course, it would be interesting if the great believers who whine about alleged atheist trolling would jump in and chastise their own, but that would break the first rule of all believer cults: Never argue with a fellow believer in public.

          February 25, 2014 at 12:46 pm |
        • Austin

          Chastize what? The new testament is lpaded with warning about apostacy . That is delusional doctrine and people who follow satan.

          Do your homework and play on tje correct field of relevance.

          It is written
          It is written
          It is written

          February 25, 2014 at 12:54 pm |
        • Lucifer's Evil Twin

          @Austin – You okay dude? You sound more schizophrenic than usual...

          February 25, 2014 at 12:57 pm |
      • thefinisher1

        You are trying to convince people that God doesn't exist and join your cult. No thanks troll.

        February 25, 2014 at 12:41 pm |
        • Lucifer's Evil Twin

          Rhetorical question – Are you brain damaged?

          February 25, 2014 at 12:47 pm |
        • thefinisher1

          Do you always deny the truth? You want people to join your side- that describes a cult. You offer no proof, when a person questions atheism, you hate it. Atheism is indeed a cult. Stalin used atheism and turned it into a death cult.

          February 25, 2014 at 12:49 pm |
        • Lucifer's Evil Twin

          You obviously don't understand what rhetorical means... but thanks for providing additional data

          February 25, 2014 at 12:55 pm |
        • hotairace

          Finished, this is from the AA website:

          "American Atheists fights to protect the absolute separation of religion from government and raise the profile of atheism in the public discourse."

          Nothing about converting believers. Their first priority is separation of church and state. They are fighting for the rights of believers. Oh, you want to maintain the status quo, where religion enjoys a special but undeserved place in modern society.

          And no, I am not an AA member. I make all my monetary contributions to atheist activities and aid to whoever needs it via richarddawkins.net.

          February 25, 2014 at 12:57 pm |
        • thefinisher1

          When your atheism is questioned, you resort to attacks and insults. Atheism is indeed a cult.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:01 pm |
        • joey3467

          I am not trying to convince anyone to be an atheist, nor am I trying to convince anyone that god doesn't exist. I would, however, like a believer to prove to me that what they believe is actually true using evidence that is more than just their feelings.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:09 pm |
      • Vic

        http://religion.blogs.cnn.com/2014/02/25/atheists-plan-conservative-outreach-with-booth-at-cpac/comment-page-1/#comment-2952906

        February 25, 2014 at 12:44 pm |
        • Lucifer's Evil Twin

          Thank you for not reposting your entire attempt at word gymnastics...

          February 25, 2014 at 12:53 pm |
    • Akira

      Sure it does. A booth at the CPAC convention clearly shows that in Republicans are a cultish group too.

      Not.

      February 25, 2014 at 12:34 pm |
      • thefinisher1

        Atheists mix religious atheist beliefs into politics. Seems like a cult to me.

        February 25, 2014 at 12:36 pm |
        • igaftr

          "Atheists mix religious atheist beliefs into politics"
          Really? Where? Be very specific.

          February 25, 2014 at 12:40 pm |
        • Lucifer's Evil Twin

          "Seems like a cult to me." – your track record on these blogs shows that you aren't the sharpest knife in the drawer... so your opinion is noted and ignored.

          February 25, 2014 at 12:41 pm |
        • thefinisher1

          Ignored? LOL. You atheists can't stand when your atheism is questioned or attacked. You're like spoiled brats.

          February 25, 2014 at 12:46 pm |
        • Akira

          Are you sincerely trying to say Christians don't try to insert their religion in their politics?

          Please, look up the arguments in Congress when DOMA was being argued.

          Then come back and tell me why it's such a bad idea for atheists to desire the sane exact voice as your preferred religion.

          February 25, 2014 at 12:50 pm |
        • thefinisher1

          Atheists whine when Christians do it but..when atheists mix atheism into politics, atheists say NOTHING?! Hypocrite trolls is what you really are.

          February 25, 2014 at 12:54 pm |
        • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

          This is merely the tired assertion that atheism is a religion.

          February 25, 2014 at 12:54 pm |
        • thefinisher1

          Atheism IS a religion. Takes a great amount of faith to believe we exist by random without the help of a creator. You still have ZERO proof we exist without a creator so yes, your atheism is indeed a religion.

          February 25, 2014 at 12:58 pm |
        • igaftr

          "when atheists mix atheism into politics"

          You keep making that claim, but how do you perceive this as happening? All atheists have been doing, and will continue to do is to keep religion out of government, there is already a huge number of places that christian lawmakers have viloated the const!tution. Athesist are just tryiong to put things back without religion. That is not pushing an objective, that is pushing BACK against an objective pushed by the religious.

          Can you show me ONE law that atheists have proposed that is anything other than removal of religon in law?

          Take your time, you'll need it.

          February 25, 2014 at 12:59 pm |
        • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

          Like I said. Tired.

          I'll add tedious.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:00 pm |
        • Akira

          Please answer the question, if you're capable: I asked it in a very direct way.

          You are the one who is whining about a booth being set up at a convention.

          If your faith is that shaky, don't visit the booth. Walk by. Problem solved.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:01 pm |
        • igaftr

          fin
          "Takes a great amount of faith to believe we exist by random without the help of a creator"

          That is not atheism. You have stated a belief. Athesim is not believing in gods.
          It has NOTHING to do with belief.
          Athesim requires no faith.

          Why is it so difficult for you to accept that atheism is simply not belief, and then keep claiming what athesis believe. Is the concept that difficult for you..i can have my 5 year old nephew explain it to you if you'd like. He gets it.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:06 pm |
        • Vic

          "Can you show me ONE law that atheists have proposed that is anything other than removal of religon in law?"

          Teaching 'Origins of Species,' aka 'Evolution of Species,' as scientific facts!

          February 25, 2014 at 1:09 pm |
        • joey3467

          Actually, Vic, that is not just atheists it is anyone with a brain.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:12 pm |
        • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

          @Vic,

          first you have to find an openly atheistic lawmaker. There's not very many who will be elected as such in this country.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:14 pm |
        • igaftr

          Vic
          "Teaching 'Origins of Species,' aka 'Evolution of Species,' as scientific facts!"

          Incorrect. That is science. It has NOTHING to do with not believing in gods. Try again.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:19 pm |
        • Vic

          With all due respect, it takes more faith to believe in 'Origins of Species,' aka 'Evolution of Species,' than to believe in God.

          I respect Empirical Science too much to NOT believe in 'Origins of Species,' aka 'Evolution of Species,' as scientific facts.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:25 pm |
        • joey3467

          It takes exactly no faith actually. That is like saying it takes faith to believe in the effects of gravity.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:31 pm |
        • Vic

          Forgot to take 'NOT' out after rephrasing! Sorry about that.

          With all due respect, it takes more faith to believe in 'Origins of Species,' aka 'Evolution of Species,' than to believe in God.

          I respect Empirical Science too much to believe in 'Origins of Species,' aka 'Evolution of Species,' as scientific facts.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:35 pm |
        • Vic

          Not the same.

          The effects of gravity are observable, testable and repeatable, whereas the 'Origins of Species,' aka 'Evolution of Species,' are NOT.

          Even better, Empirical Science has no clue what gravity is, yet, because its effects are clearly seen, we believe in the existence of gravity. God is the same way, we have no clue empirically what God is, yet, because His creation, this universe and life in it, are clearly seen, we believe in God.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:43 pm |
        • joey3467

          If you respected science you would believe what it tells you even if it conflicts with the Bible. When science and the Bible disagree I have yet to see a time when science was proven wrong.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:43 pm |
        • joey3467

          Well until all the religions come together and decide which one of the thousands of gods is up there I am not going to give it much thought. The fact that we exist doesn't prove anything other than we exist. We you have some evidence of your god that I can test in a lab I will consider it.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:46 pm |
        • igaftr

          vic
          "With all due respect, it takes more faith to believe in 'Origins of Species,' aka 'Evolution of Species,' than to believe in God."

          Not so, since there is a huge amount of information backing it up.
          The amount of information to back up the existance of god is absolutley nothing. Clearly requires faith when there is absolutely nothing to back it up. With science we have a great deal, so we can eliminate the need for faith by replacing it with knowledge.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:48 pm |
    • Dyslexic doG

      asinine.

      February 25, 2014 at 12:53 pm |
    • commonsensed01

      Asinine

      February 25, 2014 at 2:49 pm |
  13. colin31714

    The billboard campaigns are never very good. They always seem to want to shock to get media attention, but they tend to alienate people. The one in Charlotte was particularly silly. So much so that they took it down. If you want to change minds you have to (i) identify that segment of the religious whose mind can be changed; and (ii) appeal to it. The American Atheists often seem to do neither.

    Those who are too far gone or not smart enough to be influenced away from the faith are fun to toy with, but are hardly the target audience for a national campaign. I think this booth is a good idea, if properly staffed.

    February 25, 2014 at 12:23 pm |
    • stuartf287

      Yes, Tony Perkins' appeal to Thomas Jefferson is hilarious. Here are some snippets I've imported regarding one of my favorite presidents:

      Together with James Madison, Jefferson carried on a long and successful campaign against state financial support of churches in Virginia. Jefferson created the phrase "wall of separation between church and state" in his 1803 letter to the Danbury Baptists of Connecticut. During his 1800 campaign for the presidency, Jefferson had to contend with critics who argued that he was unfit to hold office because he did not have orthodox religious beliefs.

      Most deists denied the Christian concepts of miracles and the Trinity. Though he had a lifelong esteem for Jesus' moral teachings, Jefferson did not believe in miracles nor in the divinity of Jesus.

      In 1779, Jefferson proposed "The Virginia Statute of Religious Freedom," which was adopted in 1786. Its goal was complete separation of church and state; it declared the opinions of men to be beyond the jurisdiction of the civil magistrate. He asserted that the mind is not subject to coercion, that civil rights have no dependence on religious opinions, and that the opinions of men are not the concern of civil government. This became one of the American charters of freedom. This elevated declaration of the freedom of the mind was hailed in Europe as "an example of legislative wisdom and liberality never before known."

      Jefferson did not shrink from questioning the existence of God. In a 1787 letter to his nephew and ward, Peter Carr, who was at school, Jefferson offered the following advice:

      Fix Reason firmly in her seat, and call to her tribunal every fact, every opinion. Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, he must more approve the homage of reason than of blindfolded fear. ... Do not be frightened from this inquiry by any fear of its consequences. If it end in a belief that there is no God, you will find incitements to virtue in the comfort and pleasantness you feel in its exercise and in the love of others which it will procure for you. - (Jefferson's Works, Vol. ii., p. 217)

      Jefferson considered much of the New Testament of the Bible to be false. In a letter to William Short in 1820, he expressed that his intent was to "place the character of Jesus in its true and high light, as no imposter himself," but that he was not with Jesus "in all his doctrines." Jefferson described many passages as "so much untruth, charlatanism and imposture." In the same letter Jefferson states he is separating "the gold from the dross," and describes the "roguery of others of His disciples," calling this group a "band of dupes and impostors," who wrote "palpable interpolations and falsifications," with Paul being the "first corrupter of the doctrines of Jesus."

      Jefferson also denied the divine inspiration of the Book of Revelation, describing it to Alexander Smyth in 1825 as "merely the ravings of a maniac, no more worthy nor capable of explanation than the incoherences of our own nightly dreams." From his study of the Bible, Jefferson concluded that Jesus never claimed to be God.

      If Perkins would actually read the writings and letters of the people he cites, it might help open his mind and eyes to reality. Doubtful, but possible. After all, the world and all humanity is evolving towards atheism - and we'll get there if we don't blow it all up or destroy it by pollution first.

      February 25, 2014 at 12:34 pm |
      • Dalahäst

        "Jefferson expressed general agreement with Unitarianism, which, like Deism, rejected the doctrine of the Trinity. Jefferson never joined a Unitarian church, but he did attend Unitarian services while in Philadelphia. His friend Joseph Priestley was the minister. Jefferson corresponded on religious matters with numerous Unitarians, among them Jared Sparks (Unitarian minister, historian and president of Harvard), Thomas Cooper, Benjamin Waterhouse and John Adams. In an 1822 letter to Benjamin Waterhouse he wrote,

        "I rejoice that in this blessed country of free inquiry and belief, which has surrendered its conscience to neither kings or priests, the genuine doctrine of only one God is reviving, and I trust that there is not a young man now living in the United States who will not die a Unitarian.""

        – wiki

        February 25, 2014 at 12:44 pm |
        • Akira

          Doesn't that support the view that Jefferson leaned towards Unitarian teachings, including there is no Trinity, Dalahast?

          February 25, 2014 at 12:57 pm |
        • Dalahäst

          I understand not everyone is a Christian. I can appreciate people with differing beliefs than me. Jefferson had tremendous support from Christians during his time. They seemed to like him.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:00 pm |
        • Dalahäst

          I also have Unitarian friends and attend their services. They have good services.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:02 pm |
        • Akira

          Just wondering what the purpose of your quote was; it was indeed backing up Stuart's post.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:12 pm |
        • ausphor

          Dala....
          Thomas Jefferson had little respect for organized religion and its clergy....
          "Ridicule is the only weapon that can be used against unintelligible propositions. Ideas must be distinct before reason can act upon them; and no man ever had a distinct idea of the trinity. It is the mere Abracadabra of the mountebanks calling themselves the priests of Jesus."
          I wonder what he would have to say about our current TV evangelist hustlers, faith healers and scam artists.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:15 pm |
        • Dalahäst

          I agree with Jefferson. I can only imagine, like me, he wouldn't participate with the tv evangelist hustlers, faith healers and scam artists.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:17 pm |
        • Doris

          "[If] the nature of... government [were] a subordination of the civil to the ecclesiastical power, I [would] consider it as desperate for long years to come. Their steady habits [will] exclude the advances of information, and they [will] seem exactly where they [have always been]. And there [the] clergy will always keep them if they can. [They] will follow the bark of liberty only by the help of a tow-rope." -TJ

          February 25, 2014 at 1:22 pm |
        • Dalahäst

          "To the corruptions of Christianity I am indeed opposed; but not to the genuine precepts of Jesus himself. I am a Christian, in the only sense he wished any one to be; sincerely attached to his doctrines, in preference to all others; ascribing to himself every human excellence; & believing he never claimed any other"

          TJ

          February 25, 2014 at 1:25 pm |
        • Doris

          It's not just that Deists may have rejected the magic of the Bible and the Trinity. Their creator God did not play an active role in people's lives. I think that's important when you consider how much craziness we see even today that seems to stem from superstition.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:25 pm |
        • Doris

          "The United States of America have exhibited, perhaps, the first example of governments erected on the simple principles of nature; and if men are now sufficiently enlightened to disabuse themselves of artifice, imposture, hypocrisy, and superstition, they will consider this event as an era in their history. It will never be pretended that any persons employed in that service had interviews with the gods, or were in any degree under the influence of Heaven, more than those at work upon ships or houses, or laboring in merchandise or agriculture; it will forever be acknowledged that these governments were contrived merely by the use of reason and the senses.

          Thirteen governments [of the original states] thus founded on the natural authority of the people alone, without a pretence of miracle or mystery, and which are destined to spread over the northern part of that whole quarter of the globe, are a great point gained in favor of the rights of mankind."

          –John Adams, from A Defence of the Constitutions of Government of the United States of America (1787-1788)

          February 25, 2014 at 1:27 pm |
        • Dalahäst

          "The Christian Religion, when divested of the rags in which they [the clergy] have enveloped it, and brought to the original purity and simplicity of its benevolent inst.itutor, is a religion of all others most friendly to liberty, science, and the freest expansion of the human mind." TJ

          February 25, 2014 at 1:29 pm |
        • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

          Jefferson had very mixed feelings about religion:

          "Millions of innocent men, women and children, since the introduction of Christianity, have been burnt, tortured, fined and imprisoned; yet we have not advanced one inch towards uniformity." – Thomas Jefferson, Notes on Virginia, 1782

          "And the day will come when the mystical generation of Jesus, by the supreme being as his father in the womb of a virgin will be classed with the fable of the generation of Minerve in the brain of Jupiter. But may we hope that the dawn of reason and freedom of thought in these United States will do away with this artificial scaffolding, and restore to us the primitive and genuine doctrines of this most venerated reformer of human errors. – Thomas Jefferson, Letter to John Adams, April 11, 1823

          "Ridicule is the only weapon which can be used against unintelligible propositions. Ideas must be distinct before reason can act upon them; and no man ever had a distinct idea of the trinity. It is the mere Abracadabra of the mountebanks calling themselves the priests of Jesus." – Thomas Jefferson, letter to Francis Adrian Van der Kemp, 30 July, 1816

          "...those who live by mystery & charlatanerie, fearing you would render them useless by simplifying the Christian philosophy, the most sublime & benevolent, but most perverted system that ever shone on man, endeavored to crush your well earnt, & well deserved fame.” – Thomas Jefferson, letter to Joseph Priestley March 21, 1801

          He did not subsribe to trinitarian views, virgin births, miracles, or particularly, organized religion.

          He was OK with atheists.

          "If we did a good act merely from love of God and a belief that it is pleasing to Him, whence arises the morality of the Atheist? ...Their virtue, then, must have had some other foundation than the love of God." – Thomas Jefferson, letter to Thomas Law, June 13, 1814

          February 25, 2014 at 1:36 pm |
      • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

        Exactly what nonsense does Tony Perkins think Thomas Jefferson warned us against?

        Is this supposed to be a reference to the declaration of independence, or an actual quote.

        February 25, 2014 at 12:44 pm |
    • believerfred

      Colin
      "If you want to change minds you have to (i) identify that segment of the religious whose mind can be changed"
      =>Yes, Hitler used that very effectively to fill the youth of Germany with hate, hate for a class of people he targeted for personal reason.
      =>I notice how effectively you use that tactic on the little ones, as Jesus called them, today to satisfy your personal agenda.
      Thank you for clearly stating your method. Perhaps others can not see through your cloaked attacks on those who understand what it means to actually love their neighbor and to love another greater than self.

      February 25, 2014 at 12:35 pm |
    • believerfred

      Perhaps we need the equivalent of a sex offender registry on this site to identify those like Colin who express a clear agenda to marginalize a vulnerable segment of the population that actually love God with all their heart and love others more than self.

      February 25, 2014 at 12:44 pm |
      • neverbeenhappieratheist

        "who express a clear agenda to marginalize a vulnerable segment of the population"

        Do you live in the US? Would you really consider Christians a "vulnerable segment of the population"? Really? They may have many vulnerable theological openings to stab and poke at their sore spots, those places atheists know they can't cover with anything but faith. Is it our fault that pointing out facts about the universe such as its age or that our DNA contains neanderthal and Denisovian DNA proving the Genesis account of a pre-made Adam and Eve bogus stings their imagined deity based origin?

        February 25, 2014 at 12:56 pm |
        • believerfred

          neverbeenhappieratheist
          "Would you really consider Christians a "vulnerable segment of the population"?"
          =>Yes, I was referring to the little ones i.e. those with a simple immature faith in Christ. It is natural to want acceptance so when your core belief is exposed in your biology, philosophy and comparative religion curriculum, typically dominated by agnostic philosophical naturalism, it turns into an emotional equivalent of child abuse. Militant atheists such as Colin are nothing but bullies looking for victims.
          =>As to denisovan DNA proving the Genesis account bogus that is not correct. The Genesis account concerning Adam and Eve is about the relationship between God and man. That relationship was broken by a desire outside of the truth.
          The properties of nucleotides in the process of metabolism or the chemical bonding properties themselves have no bearing or effect on the truth as presented.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:25 pm |
        • neverbeenhappieratheist

          "when your core belief is exposed in your biology, philosophy and comparative religion curriculum, typically dominated by agnostic philosophical naturalism,"

          Children do not have their own "core" beliefs, they have to be indoctrinated by their parents who have no better odds of being right about the universal origins as any religion or none.

          "it turns into an emotional equivalent of child abuse."

          That would be the parental indoctrination that forces an unproven religious theory with zero empirical evidence on an unquestioning child who just accepts whatever their parents teach them as fact. This cycle of abuse is what has led to an America that says it's religious but knows very little about its own claimed religion because they are just accepting the random varriations of religious belief of their parents, not actually doing the work it would take to truly study the bible. If they studied the bible they would likely come to the same conclusion I did after reading it cover to cover multiple times and researching it for 30 years.

          February 25, 2014 at 2:05 pm |
        • believerfred

          neverbeenhappieratheist
          In your reading of the Bible did you ever touch the kingdom of God or were you ever in the presence of God?

          February 25, 2014 at 3:03 pm |
        • neverbeenhappieratheist

          I had told myself I had many times, why else would I keep studying it for 30 years? I had everyone around me telling me this is truth, this is fact, if you study it the faith will come and it did, sort of. Faith is something you can grasp at and clutch like a greased pig but it is not something solid you can firmly grasp with no chance of losing it as doubt is always close by. To accept the bible at face value one must suspend disbelief and accept things that go against everything we know about science and physics and you must do so without a single shred of empirical evidence. That is a very tall order to maintain indeffinately which is why I know education and the ease of access to information in this techologically advanced society will eventually be the death of Christianity and all other world relgions.

          February 25, 2014 at 7:09 pm |
        • believerfred

          neverbeenhappieratheist
          Thanks, I find myself struggling often with suspending disbelief. You are right about the greased pig and you cannot catch it or hold onto it if you are using your strength to suspend disbelief. Science does not and cannot answer questions that relate to anything outside of the materialistic construct of our physical location in space and time.
          There are some people born with a genetic neurological predisposition that limits emotive response and makes belief more difficult to retain. Studies assume the amygdalae are involved in the connection of emotion and faith. The reason I bring this up is because I suspect the reason I still hold onto my faith is because there is a strong emotional connection in my conversion. It was when Christ did exactly as promised in His Word that the presence of God filled my soul and transformed my life in an instant. When doubt gets overwhelming I back through answered prayer, observed miracles and answered promised in my life to that point when I was saved by the Word of God.
          Any honest scientist will tell you where science falls short and faith is required. Science is an excuse for unbelief not evidence that addresses the unknown.

          February 25, 2014 at 8:12 pm |
      • new-man

        I'm glad you see Colin for who/what he is, and is calling him out on it. I pray others will heed your warnings and not allow their minds and heart to be assaulted by his godless vicious attacks.

        "Those who confront the Scripture we confront the authority of God Himself.” That’s most unwise given that God says, All Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, that the man of God may be complete, thoroughly equipped for every good work 2 Timothy 3:16-17. Notice it says, All Scripture, not some Scripture. "

        Colin has clearly shown and proven himself not equipped for any good work!

        http://realityrevelations.com/2013/12/16/those-who-confront-the-authority-of-god/#more-16487

        February 25, 2014 at 1:42 pm |
        • neverbeenhappieratheist

          The Christian faith is all talk and few works. The works they can point to like soup kitchens and helping the poor and downtrodden is something that can be done completely free of any religion and just takes human compassion, empathy an charity.

          February 25, 2014 at 2:19 pm |
        • believerfred

          neverbeenhappieratheist
          You are correct as working in soup kitchens and the like is simply something people (regardless if Christian or not) can do with or without God. Jesus even commented on that.
          Now, the difference is that when one goes out "in Christ" he or she is a blessing to all. That blessing is not the productive effort of man as measured or observable in tangible affect but the spiritual effect. That effort is of eternal value which is not of this world nor can it be of this world as the things of this world will pass away.

          February 25, 2014 at 3:11 pm |
  14. I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

    Kudos to CPAC – they should stand for religious liberty, which of course the FRC and most RNC members, or even the "liberty loving" tea party do not.

    While I confess I don't object to people stirring things up at a Republican conference, at the same time this is another illustration that donations to American Atheists are a waste of money. While I appreciate the idea of the squeaky wheel, they seem to enjoy being irritating more than finding a solution.

    February 25, 2014 at 12:13 pm |
    • Dyslexic doG

      unfortunately, I agree.

      February 25, 2014 at 12:15 pm |
      • Lucifer's Evil Twin

        But just think of all the humor Fox news will provide us when they cover this... It's going to be a field day for Colbert, Stewart and Maher

        February 25, 2014 at 12:28 pm |
    • Alias

      They are also being used by the GOP to draw attention to a PAC conference most of us wouldn't even notice.

      February 25, 2014 at 12:23 pm |
    • hotairace

      Much like the suffrage movement, civil rights movement and the gay rights movement, atheists in general and the AA specifically do have a solution but very few are listening. It's very easy to ignore atheists just as it was easy, for a period, to ignore women who wanted a vote and blacks and gays who wanted real equality. The majority, often with their heads stuck in a Babble, does not learn quick. Unfortunately, actions many might consider outrageous if not illegal often have to be taken to get the public's attention, to get change initiated. I might not like everything the AA does, but as long as it is non-violent I don't have a problem with them shaking up believers.

      February 25, 2014 at 12:25 pm |
      • Lucifer's Evil Twin

        It's better to be annoying... than invisible

        February 25, 2014 at 12:30 pm |
        • hotairace

          Yes, at least until you can get the other side "to the table" so that real change can begin.

          February 25, 2014 at 12:33 pm |
  15. magicpanties

    The best thing about this [being in the news] is that it is likely that some more people will actually stop and think, and when that happens, the theistic delusions start to become clear.
    Lifelong religious indoctrination can be difficult to overcome. Don't be a lemming. Think!

    February 25, 2014 at 11:57 am |
    • colin31714

      It's hard to get them to think. Just look at my exchange with Dalahast. He believes God answers prayers. Now, in order to do so; (i) God must exist and read his mind in order to know what his prayer is; (ii) God must then act to alter what would otherwise be the course of events to answer the prayer. Very simple.

      But when you put that to him, he seems oblivious to it. Then the squirming starts, "no, it's much more sophisticated than that," "no, look what Ghandi said on the issue"; "no, you don't understand."

      They just can't quite grasp the enormity of the supernatural claims they make.

      February 25, 2014 at 12:10 pm |
  16. Dyslexic doG

    are the republican christians making a statement about their lord god by having CPAC at the "Gay Lord" convention center?

    I think it might be a message from god! Is he coming out finally?!?! IT'S A MIRACLE!!!!

    February 25, 2014 at 11:55 am |
  17. hotairace

    The US Founding Fathers were quite likely among the best and the brightest for their time but there is no reason to believe they are the best and the brightest of all time, that what they thought 200+ years ago is 100% relevant today. The world is a much different place than when the USA was being formed. They lived in a time where in certain places, you could easily have been killed for daring to question religion and the existence of god. Now religion, in at least most developed countries, is on the decline, and in my not so humble opinion, this is a very good thing. I only wish I was at CPAC to watch the delusionals scuttle past the American Atheists booth!

    February 25, 2014 at 11:49 am |
  18. averagejoe7six

    I KNOW I KEEP SAYING IT...... [but who cares].... its all the same stuff anyways..

    My 1st CORE reason the bible is so unbelievable is due to the limited imagining of what a 'god' can do. God cannot create everything, then be obsolved from sin, or the creation of it. Or be obsolved from the fact that 'god' created beings so in-tune with being 'sinners'.

    My 2nd CORE reason the bible is unbelievable is due to free will. This actually goes right back to the 1st CORE reason: 'god' created everything. If a 'god' is all-knowing and all-powerful, then seeing the future is no chore. God designed things to come as well as things come to pass. SO HOW......... [whenGODdesignedEVERYTHING.com]...... is it really 'free will'? Isn't it more like, 'going exactly how God planned it', instead??

    That's all folks. The 2 biggest things I could NEVER wrap my head around. I don't even care what the bible says. The CONCEPT of god is flawed if the 'god' asks mortals to participate in it's grand scheme. It makes no sense, It makes no sense.

    There are many other reasons, but these 2 should be the top of every conversation on god because they speak to the heart of all the craziness that unfolds in the bible.

    February 25, 2014 at 11:49 am |
    • Alias

      I know I've posted this before too, but I'll explain it all to you again.
      In the beginning an all-powerful, all-knowing, eternal god created the universe. He made billions of stars and galaxies so he could have one garden with 2 people in it.
      (Go ahead, ask why. The answer is hysterical)
      He also made a heaven and a hell.
      (He knew some of his creations would need to be tortured for ever.)
      In his garden, he put a tree of knowledge.
      (When he did this he knew it would lead to the destruction of all he had created, but he did it anyway.)
      When Adam ate from the tree, god cursed every human who had not been born yet with a sin. Not just any sin, but one big enough to get them tortured for ever.
      Later, since god didn't want us all to go to hell, he got a married virgin pregnant and tortured the child to death.
      (You would think that an all-powerful god would have had other options, wouldn't you?)
      Anyway, some of the people living on the south west shore of the Mediterranean Sea got to see his son and be saved from hell.

      Any questions?

      February 25, 2014 at 12:21 pm |
      • averagejoe7six

        Just one question: Why is the smartest animal on the planet still being governed by invisible, silent, odorless beings that NO human has EVER been able to produce a smidget of proof on?

        February 25, 2014 at 1:12 pm |
  19. Lucifer's Evil Twin

    This seems like an interesting but pointless endeavor... aren't the people who go to this particular rally the crazy Tea-Party christian dipshits? No closeted conservative atheist would come out in front of his/her bigoted brethren... they would probably burn them at the stake... or something equally Jesus-ey...

    February 25, 2014 at 11:47 am |
    • hotairace

      At the very least, and it has already started, if will cause a discussion and hopefully a rift within CPAC and the Republican Party about who their audience is. We will see how inclusive they are, or are not.

      February 25, 2014 at 11:52 am |
      • Lucifer's Evil Twin

        I thought inclusiveness in the Republican Party only applied when elections were coming up soon...

        February 25, 2014 at 11:55 am |
        • hotairace

          They are way behind and need to start early. Even half-dead John McCain says if an election was held today, Hillary would probably win. And other than I think she is a closet atheist without the guts to out herself, Hilary as president looks good to me.

          February 25, 2014 at 12:01 pm |
  20. Dyslexic doG

    Christians posting quotes from their bible to make a point is like posting a line from a Christmas Book to argue about Santa's sleigh flying ... sure, it says it flies in the stories but the facts are that there is no Santa (sorry kids), there is no magic sleigh, and there are no magical reindeer to guide his sleigh tonight. Anyone using any quote from your bronze age story book to try to prove a point is deluding themselves and annoying the sane.

    And you Christians wonder why we atheists sound annoyed all the time.

    February 25, 2014 at 11:45 am |
    • Lucifer's Evil Twin

      "When a Christian reaches for their book to reference a quote... you know they are about to lie their ass off..." ~LET

      February 25, 2014 at 11:48 am |
    • Dalahäst

      Only a few atheists sound annoyed all the time. They are also the same ones who post about "sky fairies", "bronzed age goat herders" and other catchy phrases they learned from fringe atheist webpages. They seem to like to post those things and imagine they have proved some point, more hokey, greeting card sayings, copied and pasted over and over again.

      February 25, 2014 at 12:06 pm |
      • Lucifer's Evil Twin

        " They seem to like to post those things and imagine they have proved some point, more hokey, greeting card sayings, copied and pasted over and over again"

        e.g. – Every Bible/Qur'an passage posted by believers' on this bulletin board... At least that's what I assume you inferred.

        February 25, 2014 at 12:13 pm |
        • Dalahäst

          I'm just poking fun at doG who criticizes people for doing such things, but turns around and does the same thing.

          February 25, 2014 at 12:16 pm |
      • colin31714

        Well take issue with the point. As far as I know, the Old Testament WAS written, cover to cover, by ignorant late Bronze Age Jewish nomads. The New Testament was written, cover to cover, by ignorant pre-Dark Ages First and Second Century Greco-Roman Christians who believed in a being barely distinguishable to a sky-fairy.

        February 25, 2014 at 12:16 pm |
        • Dalahäst

          I've read such viewpoints on many atheist webpages. I was hoping you could offer an original idea, since you criticized me for not doing so. But, I see you can't.

          Do you really think the authors were completely ignorant? Just because they don't have access to "The God Delusion" and other philosophy books you love to rehash, doesn't make them ignorant. If you put their understanding in context, and not insist you are superior and more intelligent to them, they seem to be pioneers in their time.

          February 25, 2014 at 12:22 pm |
        • colin31714

          Pioneers? Pioneers? In what? They wrote down their primitive religious beliefs. So what, those beliefs were barbaric and self-centered. It was all about them. The other 200 million people then alive never rated a mention. There is virtually nothing in the Bible that is pioneering or even particularly original.

          February 25, 2014 at 12:28 pm |
        • commonsensed01

          So Dalahast, what evidence do you have that any of the original people who passed on the verbal Old Testament and the new Testament were scholars? The Old Testament was passed own verbally because there were no scribes right?

          Why did the NT wait up to several hundred years to be written? None ot the apostles were scholars right? Did Mary go to University of Jerusalem? Did Peter go to Bethsaida College?

          February 25, 2014 at 12:32 pm |
        • Dalahäst

          They did more than just write down their beliefs. The beliefs were not primitive at the time.

          Guess what? Your beliefs will be seen as primitive, ignorant and unoriginal in hundreds of years from now. So, why should anyone listen to you? We can all go to superioratheistphilosophy.com and read your views, which are also barbaric and self-centered.

          Basically the Bible describes people that were a lot like you and I. Yea, not very original.

          February 25, 2014 at 12:36 pm |
        • Dalahäst

          commonsensed01, are you a scholar? Is Colin?

          Most of your posts do not appear to be scholarly. I'd be shocked to find scholarly material that agrees with the arrogant points that Colin makes. I seem to only find such rants on weird websites that don't provide references.

          February 25, 2014 at 12:39 pm |
        • colin31714

          Dalahast, you"said

          "They did more than just write down their beliefs. The beliefs were not primitive at the time." So, they weren't pioneering either. They were consistent with the then prevailing mythology of the region.

          Guess what? Your beliefs will be seen as primitive, ignorant and unoriginal in hundreds of years from now. So, why should anyone listen to you? We can all go to superioratheistphilosophy.com and read your views, which are also barbaric and self-centered.

          Basically the Bible describes people that were a lot like you and I. Yea, not very original.

          So again, you contradict yourself. two posts ago they were pioneers, now they are "not very original."

          February 25, 2014 at 12:47 pm |
        • Dalahäst

          They were pioneers. They really did offer new ideas and ways of looking at things. A lot of their writings influenced people from Shakespeare to makers of modern blockbusters we watch at theaters.

          But, also, like you, in some ways they were not always original. Yes. Human beings learn from other people. We don't really inherently know things. Nobody, like you imagine, just has a high IQ and that makes them better than everyone else.

          Hey, maybe you are writing things that people will wish to preserve and carry on. Just like the authors of the OT.

          February 25, 2014 at 12:57 pm |
        • colin31714

          So, they're pioneers again.

          You said, "They were pioneers. They really did offer new ideas and ways of looking at things." Such as....???

          February 25, 2014 at 1:01 pm |
        • Dalahäst

          Read the Proverbs and Psalms. Those writings, poems, sayings and songs reveal new truths to me that I hadn't considered before.

          Were they the first to ever consider or write such things? I don't know. But some ideas I first learned from them. I know they can serve as tools in teaching the hopes, doubts, aspirations, disappointments and discouragement one might feel when seeking God's will.

          February 25, 2014 at 1:12 pm |
    • thefinisher1

      Asinine.

      February 25, 2014 at 12:33 pm |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.