home
RSS
The surprising history of prayer in space
Astronaut Buzz Aldrin on the moon in 1969, just after receiving communion aboard Apollo 11.
July 7th, 2011
09:22 AM ET

The surprising history of prayer in space

By Thom Patterson, CNN

It may be the first prayer ever uttered by a space traveler: "Dear Lord, please don't let me f- up."

Dubbed "Shepard's Prayer," this brief, irreverent plea is often attributed to the first American in space - the late Alan Shepard - although he reportedly said he was misquoted.

My Take: Space travel is a spiritual experience

As Friday's historic final shuttle launch approaches, Shepard's Prayer speaks volumes about the wide spectrum of religious beliefs among the relatively few men and women who've risked their lives by traveling into space.

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Culture & Science • Prayer • Technology

My Take: Space travel is a spiritual experience
July 6th, 2011
12:54 PM ET

My Take: Space travel is a spiritual experience

Atlantis' journey to Alpha, the international space station, will be NASA's 135th and final mission in the space shuttle program, which began 30 years ago. Tune in to CNN's live coverage of the launch Friday, starting at 10 a.m. ET on CNN, CNN.com/Live and the CNN mobile apps. Then check out "CNN Presents: Beyond Atlantis" Friday at 10 p.m. ET.

Editor's Note: Madhu Thangavelu conducts the Space Exploration Architecture Concept Synthesis Studio at the University of Southern California.

By Madhu Thangavelu, Special to CNN

Religion and scientific pursuits parted company centuries ago, at least in the eyes of the public.

Everyone knows the story of Galileo, who stood by his empirical evidence of the Copernican, sun-centered view of our solar system even under the threat of death by the church’s preferred method for punishing heresy: burning at the stake.

The church confined Galileo to house arrest for the rest of his life.

America's Space program, then and now

And yet for millennia, religion was the primary purveyor of science, especially astronomy. That’s evident in the symbols and images projected in cathedrals and mosques and temples all over the world. For a long time, the heavens belonged to God and religion, and scientists from Newton to Einstein have framed scientific inquiry as a divine investigation.

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Culture & Science • Opinion • Spirituality • Technology

Evangelist produces ‘Real Housewives of the Bible’ DVD
July 5th, 2011
10:16 AM ET

Evangelist produces ‘Real Housewives of the Bible’ DVD

By Liane Membis, CNN

There’s a new set of housewives on the block.

These women aren’t whining about fashion faux pas and socialite misgivings. Their stories are cast somewhere between the books of Genesis and Revelation.

Ty Adams, a web-based evangelist and author, is producing “The Real Housewives of the Bible,” a two-part DVD series that tracks six women dealing with the ups and downs of marriage as they strive to be good wives.

FULL POST

- Liane Membis

Filed under: Bible • Culture & Science • Entertainment

June 13th, 2011
02:45 PM ET

The Book of Mormon wins big at Tony Awards

The stars of Broadway talk about performing on stage in front of live audiences day in and day out.

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Culture & Science • Mormonism • Theater

Mark Burnett to turn the Bible into a series
May 25th, 2011
09:31 AM ET

Mark Burnett to turn the Bible into a series

Oh Lord, the Bible is being turned into a miniseries.

According to the Hollywood Reporter, reality TV producer Mark Burnett will be helming the series, which will be a "five-part, 10-hour scripted docu-drama with live-action and state-of-the-art CG" to air on the History Channel.

"This is probably the most important book in mankind, regardless of your beliefs or religious affiliation," History president and general manager Nancy Dubuc told THR. "This series will bring the historical stories of the Bible to life for a new generation.

Read the full story about Burnett's Bible series on CNN's Marquee blog.
- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Bible • Culture & Science • TV

Baldwin goes behind camera for faith-based video
Stephen Baldwin (left) partnered with singer Cory Lamb on the video "Break the Cycle"
May 20th, 2011
05:27 PM ET

Baldwin goes behind camera for faith-based video

By Steve Almasy, CNN

(CNN) - Singer Cory Lamb’s new single is called “Break the Cycle,” a song about going from the world where you exist for yourself to one where you live for God.

“It’s about being in the world, not of it,” Lamb said recently by phone from New York.

The message of the song resonates with Stephen Baldwin, the youngest of the acting Baldwin siblings and a devout Christian who has been known to share his story of redemption - and his own breaking of “the cycle.”

Baldwin, who says he was born again shortly after the attacks of 9/11, directed the video for Lamb’s debut song on his new CD, also entitled “Break the Cycle.” It’s the first time Baldwin has ever directed a music video. But he seemed unfazed by being behind the camera instead of being in his usual spot out front.

FULL POST

- Producer/Writer

Filed under: Culture & Science • Faith • Florida • Music • TV

Apple triggers 'religious' reaction in fans' brains, report says
At product launches, Apple store employees cheer for the first customers to buy the company's latest gadgets.
May 20th, 2011
12:16 PM ET

Apple triggers 'religious' reaction in fans' brains, report says

By Mark Milian, CNN

(CNN) - Next time Grandma asks why you're going to the mall on Sunday morning instead of church, tell her you're going to Apple Chapel.

For Apple fans, the brand triggers a reaction in the brain that's not unlike that of religious devotees, according to a BBC documentary series that cites neurological research.

Read the full story
- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Culture & Science

Religious belief is human nature, huge new study claims
May 12th, 2011
12:46 PM ET

Religious belief is human nature, huge new study claims

By Richard Allen Greene, CNN

London (CNN) - Religion comes naturally, even instinctively, to human beings, a massive new study of cultures all around the world suggests.

"We tend to see purpose in the world," Oxford University professor Roger Trigg said Thursday. "We see agency. We think that something is there even if you can't see it. ... All this tends to build up to a religious way of thinking."

Trigg is co-director of the three-year Oxford-based project, which incorporated more than 40 different studies by dozens of researchers looking at countries from China to Poland and the United States to Micronesia.

FULL POST

- Newsdesk editor, The CNN Wire

Filed under: Culture & Science • United Kingdom

April 11th, 2011
11:21 AM ET

Leading atheist publishes secular Bible

By Jessica Ravitz, CNN

The question arose early in British academic A.C. Grayling’s career: What if those ancient compilers who’d made Bibles, the collected religious texts that were translated, edited, arranged and published en masse, had focused instead on assembling the non-religious teachings of civilization’s greatest thinkers?

What if the book that billions have turned to for ethical guidance wasn’t tied to commandments from God or any one particular tradition but instead included the writings of Aristotle, the reflections of Confucius, the poetry of Baudelaire? What would that book look like, and what would it mean?

Decades after he started asking such questions, what Grayling calls “a lifetime’s work” has hit bookshelves. “The Good Book: A Humanist Bible,” subtitled “A Secular Bible” in the United Kingdom, was published this month. Grayling crafted it by using more than a thousand texts representing several hundred authors, collections and traditions.

The Bible would have been “a very different book and may have produced a very different history for mankind,” had it drawn on the work of philosophers and writers as opposed to prophets and apostles, says Grayling, a philosopher and professor at Birkbeck College, University of London, who is an atheist.

FULL POST

- CNN Writer/Producer

Filed under: Atheism • Bible • Books • Culture & Science • Ethics

My Take: Jesus would believe in evolution and so should you
The most compelling evidence for evolution comes from the study of genes.
April 10th, 2011
01:00 AM ET

My Take: Jesus would believe in evolution and so should you

Editor's Note: Karl W. Giberson, Ph.D., is vice president of The BioLogos Foundation and is the author or coauthor of seven books, including The Language of Science and Faith.

By Karl W. Giberson, Special to CNN

Jesus once famously said, “I am the Truth.”

Christianity at its best embodies this provocative idea and has long been committed to preserving, expanding and sharing truth. Most of the great universities of the world were founded by Christians committed to the truth—in all its forms—and to training new generations to carry it forward.

When science began in the 17th century, Christians eagerly applied the new knowledge to alleviate suffering and improve living conditions.

But when it comes to the truth of evolution, many Christians feel compelled to look the other way. They hold on to a particular interpretation of an ancient story in Genesis that they have fashioned into a modern account of origins - a story that began as an oral tradition for a wandering tribe of Jews thousands of years ago.

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Bible • Christianity • Culture & Science • Culture wars • Opinion • Science

« newer posts    older posts »
Advertisement
About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.

Advertisement
Advertisement